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Imok Urok2 (Imok)
Moderator
Username: Imok

Post Number: 1190
Registered: 07-2002
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 05:01 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I received this the other day and though it was good
enough to pass on.

AN ATTORNEY'S ADVICE

Read this and make a copy for your files in case you need to refer to it someday.

A corporate attorney sent the following out to the employees in his company

1. The next time you order checks have only your initials (instead of first name) and last name put on them. If someone takes your checkbook they will not know if you sign your checks with just your initials or your first name but your bank will know how you sign your checks.


2. When you are writing checks to pay on your credit card accounts, DO NOT put the complete account number on the "For" line. Instead, just put the last four numbers. The credit card company knows the rest of the number and anyone who might be handling your check as it passes through all the check processing channels won't have access to it.


3. Put your work phone # on your checks instead of your home phone. If you have a PO Box use that instead of your home address. If you do not have a PO Box, use your work address.


4. Never have your SS# printed on your checks. (DUH!) It is NEVER necessary to give anyone your SS# unless required by law. Banks, Medical Insurance, Taxes but NEVER anything that does not involve government agencies It is not an ID number and contrary to what anyone says, no one can chase you down by using it. But if you have it printed, anyone can get it and use it to obtain credit and loans in your name.


5. Place the contents of your wallet on a photocopy machine, do both sides of each license, credit card, etc., You will know what you had in your wallet and all of the account numbers and phone numbers to call and cancel. Keep the photocopy in a safe place. I also carry a photocopy of my passport when I travel either here or abroad. We've all heard horror stories about fraud that's committed on us in stealing a name, address, Social Security number, credit cards, etc. Unfortunately I, an attorney, have firsthand knowledge because my wallet was stolen last month. Within a week, the thieve(s) ordered an expensive monthly cell phone package, applied for a VISA credit card, had a credit line approved to buy a Gateway computer, received a PIN number from DMV to change my driving record information on-line, and more. But here's some critical information to limit the damage in case this happens to you or someone you know:

A. We have been told we should cancel our credit cards immediately. But the key is having the toll free numbers and your card numbers handy so you know whom to call. Keep those where you can find them

B. File a police report immediately in the jurisdiction where it was stolen, this proves to credit providers you were diligent, and is a first step toward an investigation (if there ever is one). Highly recommended and it pays off! But here's what is perhaps most important: (I never even thought to do this).

C. Call the three national credit reporting organizations immediately to place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security number. I had never heard of doing that until advised by a bank that called to tell me an application for credit was made over the Internet in my name. The alert means any company that checks your credit knows your information was stolen and they have to contact you by phone to authorize new credit. By the time I was advised to do this, almost two weeks after the theft, all the damage had been done. There are records of all the credit checks initiated by the thieves' purchases, none of which I knew about before placing the alert. Since then, no additional damage has been done, and the thieves threw my wallet away this weekend (someone turned it in). It seems to have stopped them in their tracks

The numbers are:
Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271
Hope this helps :-)
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Sweetness (Sweetness)
Moderator
Username: Sweetness

Post Number: 1207
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 08:53 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Excellent advise.
I had some checks stolen a while back. The guys who cashed them did so at a department stores, signed their own name, used their own driver's license and bought gift certificates to the tune of $800 in 2 days. They were caught on camera doing so however, the DL info was on the check so they would have been easy to find regardless!! Should have been listed on the Darwin Awards. They convinced the clerks the checks belonged to their moms who sent them to buy the certificates.

Another tip is, if you use your debit card for any over-the-counter purchases and it has a credit card logo on it, i.e., Visa or MC make sure you tell the clerk it's a credit transaction, not debit. Otherwise you enter a pin # which can be extracted by a devise designed just for that purpose.

I've used my debit card at a convenience store ATM and received a funds not avail receipt when there was money in my account. I called my bank right away and they confirmed the money was there but got the name and location of the store.
Turns out that when the store closed out that night they deducted $100, the same amt I tried to withdraw from the machine. So my bank's fraud div handled it from there. People are so used to accepting errors and going to another machine, then not doing follow up with their bank.

Don't delay in reporting the loss, debit cards can easily be used without ID or pin #.

*And without a thought of the consequence
I gave in to my decadence* Pink Floyd
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 14654
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 12:43 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

be aware of the new camera phones-
a person behind you talking on the phone
could be photographing your credit card number
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Cleanjar (Cleanjar)
Senior Member
Username: Cleanjar

Post Number: 601
Registered: 05-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 01:34 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sage advice. Thanks everyone.
Angels layed him away,
Angels layed him away,
Layed him six feet under, the clay,
Angels layed him away.
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Sweetness (Sweetness)
Moderator
Username: Sweetness

Post Number: 1208
Registered: 08-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 02:21 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Another tip is, if you use your debit card for any over-the-counter purchases and it has a credit card logo on it, i.e., Visa or MC make sure you tell the clerk it's a credit transaction, not debit.



Check with your bank first. They can easily answer this Q over the phone. Most banks handle it ok as far as the transaction being correctly entered to your account.
Good one hip.

*And without a thought of the consequence
I gave in to my decadence* Pink Floyd
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Niko Blue (420j4u)
New member
Username: 420j4u

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 10:01 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Shred you credit card reciepts.

I came home to see my garbage can on it's side. Didn't think much of it.
2 days later my Discover card called to say someone had tried to buy a computer on line on my card. And wanted to make sure it was not me.
No it wasn't.

The culprit had used a different mailing address than the mine, so it raised red flags.

I was never charged, and the basturd never got the computer.

Shred your credit card reciepts.
Niko