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Mjshroomer (Mjshroomer)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 03:08 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mushroom Names from Around the World.

Your most complete and up to date Name List.

Mushrooms are known by many names but the most commonly used names include: fungi, mushrooms, toadstools and/or elvestools.

Mushrooms which are used to bring about an alteration of consciousness are known both by ancient primitive peoples and by recreational users from around the world and include the following epithets.

The most common English language epithets used when referring to psilocybian mushrooms are listed below:

In America, as elsewhere throughout the world, entheogenic mushrooms are used ludibly by certain members of society as a tool of recreation and by some as a means of religious enlightment. Among such users the entheogenic mushrooms are commonly referred to as "magic mushrooms" and/or "shrooms".

Other common names for magic mushrooms include: shroomies, mushies, psilos, boomers, zoomers, psilocybine mushrooms and/or psilocybian mushrooms.

Peter Stafford noted that the epithet "magic mushroom" was invented and first brought to the attention of the public by a Life magazine editor who inserted this term against the wishes of R. Gordon Wasson, into the title of Wasson' Life Magazine feature contribution. R. Gordon Wasson had never appreciated the implication and insertion of the word "magic" and had indicated that he preferred the word "wondrous, and deplored the now popular and widespread use of the word "magic" and held reservations about its use.

Popular English epithets given to magic mushrooms by those who consume them for ludible purposes include the following epithets listed below in table 1.

TABLE I:
ENGLISH LANGUAGE EPITHETS

Psilocybe cubensis (gold caps, golden tops, cubes, purple rings, purple skirts).

Psilocybe semilanceata (liberty caps, liberty bells, pixie caps, blue legs).

Psilocybe stuntzii (blue ringers, Washington blue veils, Stuntzii's blue legs).

Psilocybe pelliculosa (elves caps, elves stools, woodland caps).

Psilocybe cyanescens (red saucers).

Psilocybe baeocystis (blue bells, blue fuckers). Panaeolus subbalteatus (red caps, subs).

Copelandia spp. (blue meanies, cone heads, gold caps, dimple tops, witch's tits).

Table II:

Mesoamerican Epithets:

In villages in and around the ancient ruins of Palenque, Psilocybe cubensis is employed ceremoniously by some shamans and healers. There it is referred to locally as the "San Isidro" mushroom (named after the patron saint of agriculture). Because Psilocybe cubensis and/or P. subcubensis are associated with manure, many local shamanic healers (including the late María Sabina) do not use these latter two mentioned species and consider them to be inferior.

The term teonanácatl refers to any magic mushroom in use today but is not used by the Indians of Mesoamerica. Only by Western civilization. Other Spanish and Indian names include:

hongo (mushroom).
hongos {mushrooms).
hoguitos (mushrooms).
Niño (boys).
Niños del agua (children of the water).
hongo adormece (xoporific mushroom
derrumbe (landslide mushroom).
los senores (the lords).
Keesho (Mazatec name).
San Isidro (patron saint of the fields).
San Isidro (patron saint of acriculture).
pajarito/parijaritos (littlebird/littlebirds).
cositas (little things).
chamaquillos (little boys).
pequeños que brotan (little ones that spring forth).
angelito/angelitos (little saint/little saints).
de-nizé (Mazatec for little bird).
mujercitas (little women).

TABLE IlI:
Entheogenic mushroom use also occurs outside of Mesoamerica. Published research and recreational users of psilocybian fungi have also provided history with many endearing epithets used to describe the many various species of local entheogenic mushrooms; including some ancient traditional terms. Some of the epithets listed below have only recently been known of during the last thirty to forty years while the Chinese and Japanese epithets were recorded more than two millennia ago. These include mushrooms known of in the following countries:

Other World Names for Entheogenic Fungi Species

Fiji:
nui-ni-tevoro (devils parasol).

Japan:
maitake (dancing mushroom).
waraitake (laughing mushroom).
o-waraitake (big laughing mushroom).
odoritake (jumping mushroom).
shibiretake (numbing mushroom).
waraitake modoki.

China:
hsiao chun (laughter mushroom).
hsiao:ho (laughter).

Spain:
sorgin zorrotz (witch's thread).

Holland:
Paddos.

Germany:
narrenschwaner (foolish mushroom).

Austria:
schwämmerln gegessen (mad mushrooms).

Hungary:
bolond gomba (fool's mushroom).

Slovakia:
zalené huby (mad mushroom).
szmer (szalec-foolish).

Africa:
Central Africa: (Banzu people): losulu.

Ivory Coast: (Mao people): tamu. (mushroom of knowledge).

Zaire: (Eala people): abanda.

Samoa:
faleaitu (ghost house or comedy).
pulouaitu (ghost hat).
ta-epoui (cow-dung).

Bali:
jamur tahi sapi (magic mushrroms).
legelain (dizziness).

Thailand:
hed keequai (mushroom which appears after water buffalo deficates).
hed kee wua (mushroom which appears after cow shits.

New Guinea:
koull tourroum, koobltourrum.

Honduras:
suntiama for Psilocybe cubensis..

Guatemala:
parajitos (little birds).

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Mjshroomer
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 07:25 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

more great archive material there,
thx, mj.
keep it coming !

but i thought an epithet meant an offensive name.
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Zani (Mindmirrorman)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 07:32 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Epithet

1a. A term used to characterize a person or thing, such as rosy-fingered in rosy-fingered dawn or the Great in Catherine the Great.
b. A term used as a descriptive substitute for the name or title of a person, such as The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln.
2. An abusive or contemptuous word or phrase.
3. Biology A word in the scientific name of an animal or plant following the name of the genus and denoting a species, variety, or other division of the genus, as sativa in Lactuca sativa.
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Zani (Mindmirrorman)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 07:33 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Who knew? ! Learning something new every day because of this site!
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 07:35 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lol
yup,
so an epithet need not be offensive,
strictly speaking,
but often is.
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Zani (Mindmirrorman)
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2002 - 07:46 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And the cubensis part of the taxonomic name 'psilocybe cubensis' is in Biology terms, its epithet.

It's neat that their are so many words that we know the jist of, but not real definition. That was definately one of them for me.

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