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Archive through August 24, 2002mike braundjoey ramone20 1 08-24-02  11:27 pm

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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 01:03 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Parental Responsibility Laws

"Susan and Anthony Provenzino of St. Clair Shores, MI, knew their 16-year-old son, Alex, was troubled. His first arrest occurred in May 1995, and in the year that followed, he continued his delinquent behavior by committing burglary, drinking alcohol, and using and selling marijuana. Alex was difficult at home as well, verbally abusing his parents and once attacking his father with a golf club. Although the Provenzinos were disturbed by Alex's behavior, they supported his release from juvenile custody during the fall of 1995, fearing he would be mistreated in the youth facility where he was detained -- a facility where juveniles charged with more violent crimes were housed.70

It is unlikely that the Provenzinos expected to be the first parents tried and convicted of violating a 2-year-old St. Clair Shores ordinance that places an affirmative responsibility on parents to ". . . exercise reasonable control over their children."71 On May 5, 1996, however, after a jury deliberated only 15 minutes, the Provenzinos were convicted of violating the parental accountability ordinance. They were each fined $100 and ordered to pay an additional $1,000 in court fees.72

The Provenzino case brought national attention to a growing trend at both State and local levels to combat youth crime: the enactment of parental responsibility laws imposing liability on parents for the delinquent behavior of their children. Caught somewhere between prevention and punishment for both children and parents, these laws attempt to involve parents in the lives of their children by holding them civilly and/or criminally liable for their children's actions. Penalties for violation of these laws include increased participation by parents in juvenile proceedings; financial responsibility for restitution payments and court costs; financial responsibility for detention, treatment, and supervisory costs; participation in treatment, counseling, or other diversion programs; and criminal responsibility and possible jail time for parents found negligent in their supervision"


"Tort liability for damages caused by delinquent youth is yet another way States traditionally have held parents accountable for the misdeeds of their children. Typically, tort law varies from State to State regarding the monetary thresholds on damages collected, the age limit of the child, and the inclusion of personal injury in the tort claim. Hawaii was the first State to enact such legislation in 1846, and its law remains one of the most broadly applied in that it does not limit the financial bounds of recovery and imposes liability for both negligent and intentional torts by underage persons.75 Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, and New Jersey also do not place a limit on the amount of recovery. Today, all States but New Hampshire and New York have provisions holding parents civilly responsible for youth crime, with an average maximum recovery amount of $4,100"


"Legislation holding parents criminally responsible for the delinquent acts of their children quickly followed the enactment of civil liability and neglect-type statutes. In 1903, Colorado became the first State to establish the crime of contributing to the delinquency of a minor (CDM). Supporters of CDM statutes believe that the conditions within the family are the most predictive component of a child's behavior and that it is the responsibility of the parent to provide sufficient positive guidance to children on the importance of adhering to the values of society at large. This type of legislation quickly gained popular support, and since the enactment of the Colorado initiative, at least 42 States and the District of Columbia have passed similar legislation.77 One of the oldest of such laws, an amended CDM statute from California, includes misdemeanor sanctions against parents who fail ". . . to exercise reasonable care, supervision, protection and control over their children."78 The California law was expanded in 1988 as a component of a larger, antigang initiative undertaken by the State. Violation of the provision brings a misdemeanor charge and may include a fine no greater than $2,500 and a 1-year prison term. In 1995, Arizona, Louisiana, and Wyoming enacted comparable laws creating a crime of "improper" or "negligent" parental supervision, with misdemeanor sanctions similar to the law in California.

"Some States have taken action to hold parents liable when children gain access to a firearm, but their provisions vary in language and parental intent requirements. At least nine States hold adults criminally responsible for storing a loaded firearm in such a way as to allow a minor to gain access. Some of these provisions include an enhanced penalty if the minor causes injury or death to himself or another person and create exceptions for parental liability when the minor gains access to a weapon by unlawful entry into the home or place of storage or if the firearm is used in self-defense. In addition, 13 States have provisions that create criminal liability when a custodial adult or parent is aware that his or her child possesses a firearm unlawfully and does not take action to prevent the possession.79 Typically, penalties levied on parents for violation of safe storage laws are misdemeanors, but parents found guilty of these crimes in California, Connecticut, and Florida are subject to felony charges under some circumstances.80"


all above are excerpts and i tried not to take anything out of context, to read the whole thing go to:


http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/pubs/reform/ch2_d.html
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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 01:12 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Which states have a parental responsibility statement in their juvenile code purpose clause?

As of the end of the 1998 legislative session, 10 states, Alabama, Alaska, Florida, Idaho, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Virginia, have a parental accountability statement in their juvenile code purpose clause.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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Can the juvenile court order parents to attend a court-appointed parental responsibility training program/parent education program?

Arkansas, California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming allow the juvenile court to order parents to attend a court-approved parental responsibility training program/parent education program.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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Is the juvenile court allowed to publicly disclose a parent's name if his or her child commits a serious offense?

Alaska, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Wisconsin have statutes in their juvenile code that allow for public disclosure of the parent's name if his or her child commits specified serious offenses.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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Is the juvenile court allowed to require parents to aid in the enforcement of court orders concerning their delinquent child's rehabilitation program?

Eleven states, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming require parents to aid in the enforcement of court orders concerning their delinquent's rehabilitation program. Failure to aid in the enforcement of court orders can result in contempt sanctions being filed against the parent.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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Can the parent of a delinquent child be made liable for restitution?

As of the end of the 1998 legislative session, two-thirds of the states have statutes that make the parent of a delinquent liable for restitution to the victim of the delinquent act: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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Can the juvenile court permit or require parents of delinquents to participate in family treatment with their children?

Thirty-nine jurisdictions currently have statutes that permit or require parents of delinquents to participate in family treatment/counseling/probation with their children: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Szymanski, L. Parental Responsibility for the Delinquent Acts of Their Children. NCJJ Snapshot 4(7) Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.


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What are some affirmative defenses for parents under statutes that make them criminally responsible for failing to supervise their child?

Some statutes provide affirmative defenses for the parent or guardian. For example, a person is not subject to prosecution if the person is the victim of the delinquent act or reported the child's act to the local law enforcement agency, juvenile court, or other appropriate authority. It is also an affirmative defense if the person shows, to the satisfaction of the court, that they took reasonable steps to control the conduct of the child at the time they are alleged to have failed to supervise the child; or attempted to refer the child to appropriate treatment or corrective facilities In some states, the parents are not subject to liability if their failure to exercise control was not the proximate cause of the juvenile's delinquent acts.

Szymanski, L. Criminal Responsibility of Parents for Child's Delinquent Acts. NCJJ Snapshot 4(2). Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1999.
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Lakeside (Lakeside)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 01:58 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hip, I was joking of course and referring to a recent Simpson's episode where they were making fun on Judge Judy and the laws we are discussing now.

Joey, the info you just posted kinda goes back to what I said in my first about proving the parents are negligent in some way. Though I of course didn't take the time to read all of that info, the first few lines mention what I am referring to about negligence.

"Some states have enacted laws that make parents partially responsible for their child’s crimes in cases where the parents have failed to take appropriate steps to control their child’s behavior and conduct."
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Glasshoppa (Glasshoppa)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 03:32 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is it too late to ask another question about *light* in this thread? (Not that I find the current tangent uninteresting.)

Pleas pardon my ignorance; while I consider myself *moderately* experienced in exploring alternate states of mind, I am new to the cultivation of p. cubensis. The question is:

If, as it has been suggested, it is a good idea to start exposing the jars to light at 70% colonization... how do we know the jars are thus colonized, without taking them out to inspect them? Don't they get exposed to light every time we check on them? Or is the short duration insufficient to induce a reaction?
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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 03:48 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

a few seconds or even longer, (it is suggested that 20 minutes is the min. for pin formation) will have no effect on your jars in the way of stimulation for pins
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Imok Urok2 (Imok)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 04:14 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And we are talking about 70% of the outside of the cake,
not including the inside of it in that measurement.
Hope this helps :)
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Sunday, August 25, 2002 - 02:49 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

well, that's pretty much in line with what i stated, joey.
misedemeanor and or fines for negligence supervising and financial responsibility.
but no parent is getting prison time
for their kid's growing dope.
so we need to be accurate and truthful,
we shouldn't try to scare kids
by telling them their parents will do time
if the kid grows some shrooms under his bed.
the forfeiture laws pretty much only apply to DEALERS.
and again, it's pretty near unheard of
for parents to lose their house
unless they knew the kid was dealing
or financially benefitted from drug sales.
post one case of unsuspecting decent parents
losing their house, i think you'll find it difficult.
let us not be like the anti-drug warriors,
trying to scare kids with half-truths.
how many of us have brought illegal drugs
into our parents homes ?
i know i did, many times.
sold a bit, too.
so how can i sit in judgement of others doing the same ?
it's not our job to lecture the kids about responsibility,
it's their parents' job.
i try to run off anyone i see here
that's obviously too immature,
otherwise i mind my own business.
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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 12:00 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

gotcha
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MOUSE MOUSIE (Mousie6598)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 12:27 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i know this message is old. but dont you think that its pretty bad you looked up that much info and took up all that time just to prove your point. why do you feel you have that much to prove to someone.
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 12:34 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i think the point was to get at the truth
of the matter, not merely to prove a point.
truth matters to us here.
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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 12:36 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thanks hip i didnt quite know how to take that one from mousie
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 12:46 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

my pleasure,
i, for one, though it was good
that you gathered the info,
so much so
that i think we should
archive material in our legality section.
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Imok Urok2 (Imok)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 01:30 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, the heck with my grow tips
:)
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joey ramone (Joey99652)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 01:31 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lmao
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SKITTLES (Skittles)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 02:24 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

mike braund- Something to consider: I have a friend that grows in a gun safe. One from Wal-Mart costs about 100 dollars. The low end ones that they sell are little more that oversized gym lockers. . .but would be perfect for your intended purpose. They sell a brand called "Sentinel" that can hold 12 shotguns and comes with some shelving. Scrap the shelves it comes with and build your own. . .it will hold about 250 half pint jars plus 6 shelves with a light mounted under each. If you want to do terrarium growing then you can use half the safe for that plus all your materials with as many jars as you want to fool with on some homemade shelving above. There are two half dollar sized holes in the bottom of the safe. . .if you buy a vaccum cleaner extension chord and trim off some of the excess plastic from the plug end it shoves right up in there. Presto. . .you have power to the interior of a locked area. . .
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Zani (Mindmirrorman)
Posted on Monday, August 26, 2002 - 02:05 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was looking at a locking resin-plastic storage box from Home Depot myself. This is kind of like a pick-up truck box item. $49. You would need to cut a hole in back for cords, unless you use a simple tek like perlite/misting and a battery operated light.

I found an item in the supermarket being called a 'closet light'. It is a 6 inch floro tube that runs on 4 AA batteries. The problem is that the battery wear out in 4 hours of constant use. Solution: Radio Shack and NiCad rechargables. A battery charger and a set of 4 AA NiCads costs around $20. It takes 7 hours for the NiCads to recharge. If you want more than 4 hours of light per day, you can buy a second set of NiCads.

All in all, this 'cordless' technique would be a supervised tek, with all that battery changing, air exchanging and lite misting.