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H2O2 - 1
Cobweb IdentificationBobbyhippie317 3 12-20-01  06:31 pm
H2O2 spray onto contaminated cake?TripitydoodahTigress1133 1 09-27-01  10:38 pm
cobweb pix - 1

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Admin (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 12:00 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The stuff most people imagine is cobweb on cakes is really just White Fuzz. But if you have Cobweb:

--

The use of store bought 3% H2O2 (Hydrogen Peroxide) works very well at beating cobweb mold. You have to catch it right away though, otherwise it spreads to other casings and cakes, and it also gets down into the substrate layer where its impossible to beat, but can be controlled.

H2o2 works great.. it doesn't destroy the mycelium. It temporarily does a little harm to the mycelium, but it does recover and continues growing in a few days. With cobweb mold, it spreads fast, so you have to catch it right away. When you see the beginning of what you think is cobweb mold, spray it down with h202. Give it a heavy spraying. Also move the soil around a little in the infected area as it will not all be seen only on the top surface. Check it again in about 12 hours, and give it another spraying. Do this repeatedly for a 24-48 hour period. While your spraying, also give the entire casing a light spraying of h202 and any casings or cakes nearbye. Once again.. this will not destroy the mycelium, the mycelium will recover and grow healthy again in a few days.

We have had much success lately at beating cobweb mold with h202. Early on in discovering this, the several casing that were affected around the edges and sprayed in the above way, only showed slight signs of cobweb mold in the first few days after the treatment. We stayed on it with the h202 sprayings, and it never came back. 6 weeks later, still no signs of it.

We also recently experimented with spraying some substrate cakes at their time of birthing that had some small patches of cobweb mold on the dry verm layer. The cakes were birthed, and sprayed rather heavily, allowed to sit for 5-8 minutes before being cased. A week later still no signs of cobweb mold showing up, and the mycelium grew strong and healhy,this is an absolute first in our research on cobweb mold.

One of the most important factors to beating cobweb mold is catching it early. When in real doubt, just spray it down with h202. Why take a chance. If it is cobweb mold, and you do nothing, it will spread fast and rampid and you want be able to stop it. So if signs of small patch of cobweb mold start to show up, spray it immediatly.

Some signs to help you identify it:

Strong healthy mycelium growing... then all of sudden a few small areas start getting a real fuzzy look or extreme cottony growth {over} the healthy mycelium, and the fuzzy look continues to spread fast. This is the cobweb mold attacking the healhthy mycelium. Sometimes you may have your casings just start to pin and and fruiting is about ready to start, and then stops because of this.

A big patch, what literally looks like spider cobwebs shows up on one area. You cant miss this one, it really stands out. And sometimes little black dots show up on this, small black balls, like eggs. This one especially is true with straw. I've seen it hit straw and cover a 6"x6" area within a day, with this kind of cobweb look. This look is also what you see on the dry verm layer of your substrate jars, although its not as big because it doesn't have the room to spread. Also I've never seen the black eggs show up on the dry verm, just the thick web.

Sometimes, in the early stages, you will see long "single" strands of cobweb mold shoot off from the direction of the main cobweb patch starting to form. There will be anywhere from 3-10 or more of these single strands running through the casing layer, and can reach out anywhere from an 1" to 6" and sometimes more. There will be several of them usually, and this is the beginning of them spreading to far reaches of the casing soil and building larger webs. Almost like an invisable spider going to work. These sinle strands are usually about as thick as singe piece of thin human hair.

I've also seen this mold grow on rice/birdseed cakes in chambers. The cakes started out growing really cottonly looking growth, and eventually a hugh puffball of cottony looking spiderwebs took over around the bottom of the cakes and extended out a good couple of incheds from the cake. Other molds set in as the mycelium became weak and could not fight it off. This was before the discovery of h202 to beat it. So cobweb mold is not just a casing mold.

Some other things to take note on about cobweb mold:
Mushrooms will sometimes still fruit around cobweb mold. Its ok to eat these. Except.. sometimes when they fruit around it.. the cobweb mold will attack the muushrooms, and you will see a real heavy fuzzy white balls growing on and around the caps of the mushrooms, they attack from the outside and rot the inside. The caps will turn black, and the inside of the mushroom has rotted. Do not eat these. Sometimes the cobweb mold can be very mild and does not effect the mushrooms to this extreme, and only stays on the casing layer. It all depends on what stage in the growing cycle it shows up. I highly recommend not taking spore prints of any casing or mushrooms that are infected with cobweb mold as the cobweb mold spores will travel with the mushroom spores and your newly inoculated substrate will be infected immediatly and you'll never get rid of this mold.

Cobweb mold is much harder to fight indoors then it is outdoors. Perhaps there are natural organisms outdoors wich eat the cobweb mold. If you get hit by it indoors, the best thing you can do to prevent it from coming back is to sterilze your entire growing area with 10% bleach and water. And the use of alcohol on the walls etc...yes.. its a lot work, but this mold tends to hide in the growing area waiting for new sources of food to come along or something. Also remove any substrate jars that may be nearbye, and perhaps even spray them down with h202 when birthing just to be safe. This mold spreads very very fast, and doesnt see tape on jars as a boundry to stop it. If you catch this mold immediatly when it first arrives... then perhaps you dont have to go through all this extreme.

Infected casing have a better chance of survival outdoors. We use to take infected casings outdoor, and turn them upside down, and let mother nature do the rest. Most of the time they would still fruit and not effect the mushrooms at all. Other times it was just to late and the mold was so deep into the substrate there was not stopping it. This was all before we discovered the use of h202 to beat cobweb mold. Its a whole new battle now with h202 on our side.

So your new to growing and your reading all this and getting scared of casing. Well dont be. This doesn't show up everytime you case.. only sometimes. With the proper control of h202 it shouldn't be much of a problem anymore
--from the hawk's eye

Troubleshooting Casings :
Contams :
Shroom Glossary
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Admin (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 12:01 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The use of store bought 3% H2o2 (Hydrogen Peroxide) works very well at beating cobweb mold. You have to catch it right away though, otherwise it spreads to other casings and cakes, and it also gets down into the substrate layer where its impossible to beat, but can be controlled.

H2o2 works great.. it doesn't destroy the mycelium. It temporarily does a little harm to the mycelium, but it does recover and continues growing in a few days. With cobweb mold, it spreads fast, so you have to catch it right away. When you see the beginning of what you think is cobweb mold, spray it down with h202. Give it a heavy spraying. Also move the soil around a little in the infected area as it will not all be seen only on the top surface. Check it again in about 12 hours, and give it another spraying. Do this repeatedly for a 24-48 hour period. While your spraying, also give the entire casing a light spraying of h202 and any casings or cakes nearbye. Once again.. this will not destroy the mycelium, the mycelium will recover and grow healthy again in a few days.
We have had much success lately at beating cobweb mold with h202. Early on in discovering this, the several casing that were affected around the edges and sprayed in the above way, only showed slight signs of cobweb mold in the first few days after the treatment. We stayed on it with the h202 sprayings, and it never came back. 6 weeks later, still no signs of it.

We also recently experimented with spraying some substrate cakes at their time of birthing that had some small patches of cobweb mold on the dry verm layer. The cakes were birthed, and sprayed rather heavily, allowed to sit for 5-8 minutes before being cased. A week later still no signs of cobweb mold showing up, and the mycelium grew strong and healhy,this is an absolute first in our research on cobweb mold.

One of the most important factors to beating cobweb mold is catching it early. When in real doubt, just spray it down with h202. Why take a chance. If it is cobweb mold, and you do nothing, it will spread fast and rampid and you want be able to stop it. So if signs of small patch of cobweb mold start to show up, spray it immediatly.

Some signs to help you identify it.
Strong healthy mycelium growing... then all of sudden a few small areas start getting a real fuzzy look or extreme cottony growth over the healthy mycelium, and the fuzzy look continues to spread fast. This is the cobweb mold attacking the healhthy mycelium. Sometimes you may have your casings just start to pin and and fruiting is about ready to start, and then stops because of this.

A big patch, what literally looks like spider cobwebs shows up on one area. You cant miss this one, it really stands out. And sometimes little black dots show up on this, small black balls, like eggs. This one especially is true with straw. I've seen it hit straw and cover a 6"x6" area within a day, with this kind of cobweb look. This look is also what you see on the dry verm layer of your substrate jars, although its not as big because it doesn't have the room to spread. Also I've never seen the black eggs show up on the dry verm, just the thick web.

Sometimes, in the early stages, you will see long "single" strands of cobweb mold shoot off from the direction of the main cobweb patch starting to form. There will be anywhere from 3-10 or more of these single strands running through the casing layer, and can reach out anywhere from an 1" to 6" and sometimes more. There will be several of them usually, and this is the beginning of them spreading to far reaches of the casing soil and building larger webs. Almost like an invisable spider going to work. These sinle strands are usually about as thick as singe piece of thin human hair.

I've also seen this mold grow on rice/birdseed cakes in chambers. The cakes started out growing really cottonly looking growth, and eventually a hugh puffball of cottony looking spiderwebs took over around the bottom of the cakes and extended out a good couple of incheds from the cake. Other molds set in as the mycelium became weak and could not fight it off. This was before the discovery of h202 to beat it. So cobweb mold is not just a casing mold.

Some other things to take note on about cobweb mold:
Mushrooms will sometimes still fruit around cobweb mold. Its ok to eat these. Except.. sometimes when they fruit around it.. the cobweb mold will attack the muushrooms, and you will see a real heavy fuzzy white balls growing on and around the caps of the mushrooms, they attack from the outside and rot the inside. The caps will turn black, and the inside of the mushroom has rotted. Do not eat these. Sometimes the cobweb mold can be very mild and does not effect the mushrooms to this extreme, and only stays on the casing layer. It all depends on what stage in the growing cycle it shows up. I highly recommend not taking spore prints of any casing or mushrooms that are infected with cobweb mold as the cobweb mold spores will travel with the mushroom spores and your newly inoculated substrate will be infected immediatly and you'll never get rid of this mold.

Cobweb mold is much harder to fight indoors then it is outdoors. Perhaps there are natural organisms outdoors wich eat the cobweb mold. If you get hit by it indoors, the best thing you can do to prevent it from coming back is to sterilze your entire growing area with 10% bleach and water. And the use of alcohol on the walls etc...yes.. its a lot work, but this mold tends to hide in the growing area waiting for new sources of food to come along or something. Also remove any substrate jars that may be nearbye, and perhaps even spray them down with h202 when birthing just to be safe. This mold spreads very very fast, and doesnt see tape on jars as a boundry to stop it. If you catch this mold immediatly when it first arrives... then perhaps you dont have to go through all this extreme.

Infected casing have a better chance of survival outdoors. We use to take infected casings outdoor, and turn them upside down, and let mother nature do the rest. Most of the time they would still fruit and not effect the mushrooms at all. Other times it was just to late and the mold was so deep into the substrate there was not stopping it. This was all before we discovered the use of h202 to beat cobweb mold. Its a whole new battle now with h202 on our side.

So your new to growing and your reading all this and getting scared of casing. Well dont be. This doesn't show up everytime you case.. only sometimes. With the proper control of h202 it shouldn't be much of a problem anymore
--from the hawk's eye