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drunker then u (Drunk)
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 06:16 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

this is a glovebox that i made
it was cheap and easy
i jus wanted to share
here it is cheers
all i had was a big fish tank and garbage bags

i cleaned the fish tank very well
then sat it on its side
covered the top of it tightly with a garbage bag
then i put 2 tiny holes that my hands would soon force open
then i got a garbage bag that once i cut a small hole in it would go from my rist to my elbow with a little bit extra left
and the same for another
i put on gloves and forced my hands throw each of the holes and taped the gloves to the bags
then
force my hands
throw the little holes i cut earlyer
in the top of the fish tank
it worked great
cheers to beers
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mf (Fishbone)
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 07:52 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

that sounds good and when it's not in use the aquarium is just an aquarium
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drunker then u (Drunk)
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 08:11 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

no i clean it a tape atother garbage bag
over the top but i guess u can use as
a fish tank but i dont think your fish
would be very happy with u wrecking there lives
for your own satisfaction
but thats just my opiniyon
i just cant spell
but i guess u only need it for 10 min to about a hour maby if u had a big bowl it wouldint matter
but if u dont why not just buy another fish tank for that purpus
well i guess u have to change there watter all the time thats a pretty good thing to
bring up i guess when u need to change there water why not clean it well have clones and clean tank
thats awsome never thought of it that
way
cheers
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 03:57 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

you just just get one of those aquarium back-drops with the fish and plants and stuff on it
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drunker then u (Drunk)
Posted on Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 08:18 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

great idea cheers
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fungusmaximus (Fungaloid)
Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 12:27 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No fans, or air intake/outlet?
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drunker then u (Drunk)
Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 05:58 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

no its just to clone it worked
for me if some one else where to use it
and done clones befor im sure it would work for them since this was my first time
my understanding was for clones u dont need that
cheers
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Oldtimer (Oldtimer)
Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 01:27 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

BUILDING A STERILE TRANSFER CHAMBER

In order to achieve a good success rate when making transfers, you must first construct a transfer chamber or “glove box.” This is simply an enclosed area that can be cleaned with disinfectants to keep out contaminants. Such a chamber can be designed in many ways and need not be elaborate to work well. Basically what you are striving for is an enclosure which provides a sterile, draft-free environment to work in while performing sterile culture work.

A good, inexpensive glove box can be constructed from a cardboard box, some aluminum foil and a sheet of plexiglass.

You will need the following materials:

Clean, sturdy cardboard box.
Razor knife or box cutter
Can of spray adhesive.
Roll of heavy duty aluminum foil.
Roll of duct tape.
A piece of plexiglass cut to approximately 10” x 14”.
Clean dish towel.

box1.jpg

Step I

Obtain a good, clean, sturdy cardboard box with a removable lid. The kind paper is shipped in is ideal and can be found at any printing shop or office supply company.

Use a small dish or bowl as a template and draw two circles about 5” in diameter on the front of the box. Cut out the two circular holes in the front side of the box (to allow you to insert your arms while making transfers). Also cut a square hole in the lid of the box slightly smaller than the sheet of plexiglass (approx. 9” x 13”). This hole will be covered with the sheet of plexiglass, effectively forming a “window” in the top of the box.

A razor knife or box cutter makes an ideal tool for cutting these holes in the box. Once you have the holes cut you can proceed to step II and prepare to apply the foil.

box2.jpg

Step II

Wipe the inside of the box with alcohol and allow it to dry. After the alcohol dries liberally spray the entire inner surface of the box (sides, bottom and top) with the supplied Lysol aerosol. This kills any spores that are lying dormant on the surface of the cardboard. Once the Lysol has evaporated, spray a layer of adhesive in the bottom of the box and apply a sheet of aluminum foil to cover. Do not worry if the foil has a few wrinkles or creases. You just want to have a nonporous surface that is easy to clean and sterilize as well as being waterproof. Repeat this process on all sides of the inside of the box.

box4.jpg

Step III

Fit the lid onto the box. Place the sheet of plexiglass over the hole in the lid of the box and tape each side to the box with duct tape. Be sure to seal each edge as you tape the plexiglass down to the box. This forms a nice, airtight “window” in the top of the box which will allow you see into the cabinet with no risk of contamination from airborne spores and bacteria.


Leave the lid of the box removable (do not tape) to allow easy access for placing your materials inside prior to performing sterile transfer work.

box5.jpg

STEP IV

Take a small, clean dishtowel and drape it across the top of the box so that it hangs down over the two hand holes in the front.

Run a strip of duct tape along the edge of the towel taping it to the lid of the box along the edge of the plexiglass.

The towel serves as a barrier to prevent drafts from entering the cabinet while you are working, effectively keeping contaminants out.

Do not tape the lid down. Leave the lid removable so it will be easier later when you need to load materials into and out of the sterile cabinet.

box6.jpg

Congratulations! You now have a completed, fully functional sterile transfer cabinet that only cost a few bucks.... Spray inside of chamber with Lysol before each use but....ALLOW ALCOHOL FROM LYSOL to EVAPORATE COMPLETELY!!! before lighting any burners or lighters inside of box... unless you like the "hairless" look and don't mind your arms stinging like hell for a day or two!

OT
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 02:26 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

great post, as always, oldtimer.
definite archive material there.
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drunker then u (Drunk)
Posted on Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 03:57 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

tats really good lookin box
cheers

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