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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 02:32 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

what you want to see, even in a seedless crop, is swollen seed pods.
ignore the hairs. i know everyone sez look at the % of red hair but in truth, that can be misleading as environmental factors play a big role. and as your example shows, lower buds turn brown early on, but they still are not at their prime.
what you really want to look at is those false seed pods, they'll swell up and get full which makes the buds nice and dense, getting that sticky crystal look on them, and the full aroma of the plant.
don't be hasty, most pick too early. let it go a bit longer and it's well worthwhile, the potency in pot is different from shrooms. much of the potency of cannabis is gained in just the last 2 weeks before harvest-time.
so every day counts quite a bit as you near the end zone.
so look for the pods to swell on any given cola before you harvest it.
archive material
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 03:46 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thx for the advice , i planned for the main cola to go to full maturity to know what it's capable of
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ridder (Ridder)
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 05:19 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

according to rosenthal plants reach peak potency (females) right before the start of flowering.. then a drop in during the first week as the switch from veg to flowering occurs, then a pick up again for the majority of the flowering cycle, then a drop at the end when the flowering slows... one problem i have often seen is people pick them too late trying to get too much bulk, and the potency degrade tremendously.
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 07:13 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

when growing unknown strains i like to harvest some buds at different stages to see the difference in effects , but as hippie stated the browning of the hairs is at a different rhytm for different strains , so if i like the strain i'll get to know it better after a few harvests , when i have seen their full potential.
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 11:47 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i may not be 'ed rosenthal' but i damn well know good weed. grew it full time for 10 years in and out,
so anyone would be well advised to listen to my counsel.
look for the swollen pods.
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ridder (Ridder)
Posted on Friday, July 04, 2003 - 08:37 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i've heard and read that too hip, just repeating what the studies have shown :)
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Friday, July 04, 2003 - 11:27 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

understood.
but there's a pretty big gap sometimes
between book learning and hands-on experience.
and books sometimes omit little secrets,
or even spred falsehoods. they also often contradict each other.
i know i read every mj book i could get my hands on and still had to learn much by experience in the field.
took several years to get 'good' at it, too.
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Leprachaun (Leprachaun)
Posted on Saturday, July 05, 2003 - 12:14 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know what you mean, Hippie3. I had loads of books on indoor gardening, alledgedly the best ones you could buy. They turned out to be full of shit for the most part. I don't know how some assholes get away with peddling info that is 20 years out of date and plainly rubbish. It is very annoying and cost me a lot of money and yield. Like, one "top" book said that mj plants can withstand high humidity and stagnant air. Bullshit!!!!!!!!! Read somewhere that a plant needs to be grown for 3 or 4 months before inducing flowering. Bullshit! Read that non-resinous leaves are a good smoke. Bullshit! And advice on lighting intensity which turns out to be totally inadequate. I could go on and on........

And all this crap about mixing up a "special" soil for growing mj is rubbish too. Multi-purpose compost works fine. And most books go totally overboard in their advice on fertilizing, resulting in plants with a bitter chemical taste and leaves so dark green they look blue. I'm so annoyed thinking about this I could kill an mj book author!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2003 - 12:31 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lol
i know that feeling.
i proly have about $ 500 worth of books on cannabis growing. most of the info is fairly useless if somewhat interesting.
you'll learn more lurking at overgrow a few months than you would reading all those books.
but you still won't really know much until you get a few years experience.
in cannabis gardening,
murphy's law reigns supreme.
whatever can go wrong,
will.
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Leprachaun (Leprachaun)
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2003 - 10:23 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hippie3,
You should write a book about growing cannabis. The cultivation scene is crying out for a good book written by someone who actually knows what he is talking about. You could make a lot of money. You could be the next Ed Rosenthal.

I've no interest in cultivating cannabis anymore. Got too fond of sweet buds. Had to give it all up just as I thought I was getting the hang of it. Growing the plants is nearly as much fun as smoking them, and I miss that sometimes. Shroom cultivation is a good substitute though.
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2003 - 11:54 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the 3 jolly widows are doing fine , each day a bit more , patience seems to be the keyword here , maturing from bottom to top , the bottom buds are forming those empty pods right now for some days yet , the maincola has some more weeks to go but those bottombuds are really tempting to look at and don't harvest them .
when i start the ventilation going out , i made a habbit of smelling the first 30 seconds , inhale that firm smell of wisdom
the 2 others will finish minimum 2 weeks later , i estimate from the growth of the early riser
sorry no pics , i have to cut a bud and bring outside for goodpics as the hps lamps don't allow for good pics but i will illustrate the 'empty pods' asap
christmas in july !!!
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Tuesday, July 08, 2003 - 12:12 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

sounds great, myco.
looking forward to the pix.
leprachaun,
i have no interest in either making alot of money or in making myself a target like rosenthal did.
i'm just trying to help out a few friends.
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 09:43 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

been cutting some small buds from the bottombranches ,dried 'em and smoked .They were disappointing in potency .The ones i've cut the next day were already stronger ,they went straight to the thc receptors :-)
so the empty seedpods showed and now half of a plant is filled with it ,should i wait for the hairs to become brown completely or just look at the percentage of seedpods turned brown and when most are brown or wilting (the hairs) harvest then ?
btw , after the empty seedpods showed , there was a great increase in the total budmass ,i esimate between one thirth to a half of the total mass . I can easily imagine people harvesting too soon as at a certain stage the plant is filled with buds full of brown hairs , just before the seedpods show .
i'm planning to keep the maincola intact so i can take pics of 'em for documenting this strain
meanwhile the hawaiianxskunk's are doing great ,i needed to bend them as they were about to reach the top of the greenhouse , 2 tops even broke , they are rather fragile but they recovered well...
great summer over here
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 12:49 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

now you see what i was saying, excellent.
the empty pods are indeed the key.
your plant now sounds pretty close to harvest time,
but i'd just harvest those parts that are podded up and let the rest continue, proly about another week.

Quote:

just look at the percentage of seedpods turned brown and when most are brown or wilting (the hairs) harvest then



that's essentially correct, sometimes there aren't all that many hairs even left, just a few poking out from the pods.
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 02:31 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

K
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2003 - 01:13 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

troubles in paradise...
from the bestgrowing afghanxskunk i took 2 clones a while ago and let them grow in the greenhouse till big enough to bring in the 12 hrs lightcycle.
They are under the hps lamps for a week now and clearly show budding . They also show signs of SPIDERMITE . They must have catched it in the greenhouse as the other afghans were unaffected . I used a kind of pocketmicroscope that enlarges the view x 30 to get a closer look at them and they were colonizing the clones all over , i washed them leaf by leaf with soapsolution and after that with peroxidewater .some of the leaves from the bloomers at final stage were affected also where they touched the clones , i washed them as well and the branches and stem . i'll repeat this for a while untill they are gone ,hopefully . Those damn spidermites are the main reason why i prefer outside cultivation as the plants are less prone to attacks because the presence of predators in the air seems to keep the plants in good health . Once the plants are harvested i plan on a thorough cleaning of the growrooms to prevent future attacks . I used to spend a lot on the spidermite ennemies ; a kind of wasp that eats the eggs from the spidermites , but that only helps in the early stages and i don't have the money to spend on 'em so prevention will be a must . My guess is that the infection comes from the motherwort plants that are growing in the greenhouse too . So right now my main concern is to survive as much plants as i can and to treat the misty's as soon as they have some more real leaves . in my deck of cards spidermite is defenitely numero uno right now . If i can manage to make an adaptor to attach the camera to the pocketmicroscope i'll show you how these buggers look like , the eggs are blackcoloured . The eggs survive treatment usually so i'll have to continue for a while spraying the soapsolution till they give up , they hate water and cold . I hate to have to do this now while they are flowering because i know from the past that the soap leaves a nasty taste to the buds but i have no choice otherwise they'll take over the place
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 - 01:30 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

it's pretty common to see mites, esp. on older plants and of course any cuttings taken from such plants.
you now have a real big problem.
for one thing,
they lay eggs in your soil,
making it hard to get rid of them.
you'll need to toss out any infected soil,
bleach wash the entire area,
and wage war on the bastids.
use a hand vac to suck up most of them off the plants, esp. the under-sides of leaves, stems.
use pyrethin-based bug bombs [aerosol] every 10-14 days to kill hatchlings before they can lay eggs.
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myco domesticus (Mycophil)
Posted on Saturday, August 02, 2003 - 02:18 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i'm trying a combination of spraying kelthane which is specific for spidermites , and the next few days spraying the plants well with water , that vacu seems like a good idea
i've had harvest destroyed before by them , i hate it when it happens in the flowering period , cause the products leave traces and bad taste on the plant
spidermites were a big problem in holland , some years ago when i bought clones . i've read it can even be introduced in seedbatches
Predators. There are several species of predator mites and insects available for spider mite control. Some species are better adapted for warmer, drier environments; other species survive best in cooler temperatures with higher humidity.
Phytoseiulus persimilis. Known for quick control of spider mites, P. persimilis reproduces faster than spider mites and actively seeks out spider mite nymphs and adults. Prefers 60-85 degrees F 55-65% RH.

Neoseiulus californicus. Although not as quick-acting as P. persimilis, N. californicus can survive longer without prey. Recommended for all kinds of indoor and greenhouse situations. Prefers various temperature and humidity levels.

Stethorus punctillum.These tiny beetles are gaining popularity as reliable spider mite predators. They thrive in a broad range of temperature and humidity levels.

Orius insidiosus. Also known as minute pirate bugs, O. insidiosus is a tenacious general predator well adapted for dry and warm weather, the kind of weather spider mites thrive in. Prefers 60-80 degrees F/40-70% RH.

the insect Therodiplosis persicae , a kind of musquito lays its eggs in a cocon near the spidermites and the larvae eat then the spidermites , it reproduces faster than sp. at 20°c and it stops reproducing when humidity is lower than 60% so the most effective time to use 'em is in the springtime

it seems to be important when using chemicals on the mites to switch to different kinds to prevent resistance build-up in the mites
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Posted on Saturday, August 02, 2003 - 12:49 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

predator mites are ok but they only reduce the population then they move off to greener pastures.
same with ladybugs.
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Derek (Morbydvisns213)
Posted on Saturday, August 02, 2003 - 09:54 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

www.growkind.com
www.thcseeds.com
are some good herb community info boards
good info with some knowledgable people on it as well.
hippy, thanks for sharing ur wisdom as well, ive leared alot from ya both mycologically and herbally =)