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SL (2ci)
Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 34
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 02:49 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does anyone know any good recipes for ayahuasca with easily available ingridients?

Thankl
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polly ester (Carcenogenic)
Senior Member
Username: Carcenogenic

Post Number: 178
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 04:11 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

do a search of the archives. my monkey suggests the hcl extracton of mimosa hostilis with a side of banisteriopsis caapii.
there are allot of plants you can make ayahuasca out of. search for yage, or ayahuasca and if you still have questions get back to us.

xoxo
polly
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Roo (Roo)
Senior Member
Username: Roo

Post Number: 310
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 06:35 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is a good place to start....


Newsgroups: alt.drugs,alt.drugs.chemistry,bionet.plants,bionet .mycology
Subject: Tryptamine FAQ (Last update - August 1994)
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 1994 07:48:44 GMT

TRYPTAMINE CARRIERS Last update August 1994
===================
by Petrus Pennanen ([email protected])
with help from Michael from Melbourne ([email protected]).

Thanks to many individuals for help in putting this together!
If you know sources of tryptamines that are not mentioned here please mail us.

ORALLY AND PARENTERALLY ACTIVE PSYCHOTROPIC TRYPTAMINE DERIVATIVES
Based on McKenna & Towers 1984

R4 R1
| /
R5 // \ /\ N
\// \ ____/ \ / \
| || || | R2
| || || |
\ /\ / R3
\ / \ /
N
H Dosage Route
Name of Compound R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 (mg) Oral/Par.
-------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------
tryptamine H H H H H 100 *1 par/oral?
DMT (dimethyltryptamine) CH3 CH3 H H H 60 par
DET C2H5 C2H5 H H H 60 par/oral
DPT n-prop n-prop H H H 60 par/oral
DAT C3H5 C3H5 H H H 30 par/oral
DIPT i-prop i-prop H H H 30 oral
5-MeO-DIPT i-prop i-prop H H OCH3 12 oral
5-MeO-DMT CH3 CH3 H H OCH3 6 par
psilocin CH3 CH3 H OH H 12 *2 oral
CZ-74 C2H5 C2H5 H OH H 15 *2 oral
serotonin H H H H OH 100 *3 oral
bufotenine CH3 CH3 H H OH 16 *4 par
IT-290 H H CH3 H H 30 oral
4-hydroxy-alfa-methyl-
tryptamine H H CH3 OH H 20 *3 oral
MP-809 H H CH3 H CH3 60 *5 oral
5-fluoro-alfa-methyl-
tryptamine H H CH3 H F 25 *6 oral
5-methoxy-alfa-methyl-
tryptamine H H CH3 H OCH3 3 oral
4-hydroxy-diisopropyl-
tryptamine i-prop i-prop H OH H 12 *6 oral
4-hydroxy-N-isopropyl,
N-methyl-tryptamine i-prop CH3 H OH H 6 *6 oral
N-t-butyl-tryptamine H t-butylH H H ? *7 par?
3-(2-(2,5-dimethyl
pyrrolyl)ethyl)-indole H H H ? ?
5-alfa-DMT CH3 CH3 CH3 H H ? ?
-------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------
Data compiled from Kantor, et al. 1980; Shulgin 1976,1982; Shulgin&Carter 1980
*1 Autonomic symptoms; little central activity.
*2 The phosphate esters are psilocybin and CEY-19, respectively; both are
stoichiometrically equivalent to the 4-hydroxy isomers.
*3 Cardiovascular and autonomic symptoms; little central activity.
*4 A pressor amine rather than a hallucinogen in man.
*5 An antidepressant rather than a hallucinogen in man.
*6 Based on anonymous reports in the lay press. No clinical studies have been
published.
*7 No oral activity with doses up to 20 mg, may be parenterally active.

Other potentially psychedelic tryptamines include
6-fluoro-alfa-methyltryptamine, 7-methyltryptamine, 5-methyltryptamine,
5-fluorotryptamine, 6-fluorotryptamine and 5- and 6-fluorotryptophans.

MAO Inhibitors and Tryptamines

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is the primary inactivation pathway of most
tryptamines. Because of this, inhibitors of the MAO enzyme (MAOIs) can be
used to potentiate the effects of tryptamines and to make DMT and 5-MeO-DMT
orally active.

MAO inhibitors fall into two classes: Irreversible and reversible MAOIs.
Irreversible MAOIs (e.g. the hydrazides iproniazid and phenelzine) bind
permanently to the enzyme and cause MAO inhibition lasting 1-2 weeks after
ingestion. They are used clinically to treat depression. Reversible MAOIs,
such as moclobemide, which is used as an antidepressant, and the beta-
carbolines harmine and harmaline, are effective for much shorter time, maybe
up to 24 hours. Recreational drug users around the world are using mainly
harmine and harmaline despite the lack of scientific studies on their
effects on humans.

Natives of Amazon have traditionally combined Banisteriopsis caapi vine,
which contains harmine, harmaline and related beta-carbolines, with DMT-
containing plants to make an orally active brew called ayahuasca. Other
plants containing harmine and/or harmaline can be substituted for B.
caapi. The usual 'North-American ayahuasca' consists of Peganum harmala
seeds and Desmanthus illinoensis roots, and in Australian 'acaciahuasca'
leaves of Acacia complanata are combined with material from DMT-containing
acacias (the effectivity of this mixture hasn't been confirmed). MAOIs
have also been used to potentiate the effects of mushrooms containing
psilocybin. Terence McKenna has mentioned chocolate being a weak MAOI, which
could be a reason for the popular habit of ingesting mushrooms with cocoa.

Peganum harmala (Syrian rue) seeds are the most concentrated natural source
of harmine and harmaline - about 3% of their weight consists of these
alkaloids. Banisteriopsis caapi has been found to contain from 0.18% to
1.36% beta-carbolines, with the concentration of harmine being from 0.057%
to 0.635% (McKenna et al. 1984). According to anecdotal reports one gram
of P. harmala seeds ingested inhibits MAO enough to make DMT orally active.

Harmine and harmaline are hallucinogenic on their own with doses
starting from around 300 mg (Naranjo 1967). They have little emotional
or 'psychedelic' effects, but produce strong visual hallucinations. Because of
this the natives of Amazon often add larger amounts (75-100 cm of stem per
dose) of B. caapi to ayahuasca brew than is needed for MAO inhibition
(Luna 1984).

There are significant dangers in using MAO inhibitors. MAOIs potentiate
the cardiovascular effects of tyramine and other monoamines found in
foods. Ingestion of aged cheese, beer, wine, pickled herring, chicken liver,
yeast, large amounts of coffee, citrus fruits, canned figs, broad beans,
chocolate or cream while MAO is inhibited can cause a hypertensive
crisis including a dangerous rise in blood pressure. Effects of
amphetamines, general anaesthetics, sedatives, anti-histamines, alcohol,
potent analgesics and anticholinergic and antidepressant agents are
prolonged and intensified. Overdosage of MAOIs by themselves is also
possible with effects including hyperreflexia and convulsions.

Self-Synthesis of DMT Derivatives

Tryptamine derivatives and beta-Carbolines have been detected as
endogenous metabolites in mammals, including humans. Methyl transferases
that catalyze the synthesis of tryptamines, including DMT, 5-MeO-DMT and
bufotenine, are found in human lung, brain, cerebrospinal fluid, liver
and heart (McKenna & Towers 1984). In the pineal gland MAO is the primary
inactivation pathway of serotonin, a neurotransmitter synthesized from the
amino acid tryptophan. If MAO is blocked by harmine, harmaline or other MAO
inhibitors serotonin can be converted by the methyltransferase enzymes
HIOMT and INMT into psychedelic tryptamines (serotonin --(HIOMT)-->
5-MeO-trypt. --(2*INMT)--> 5-MeO-DMT).

So, ingesting l-tryptophan to increase serotonin levels, a candy bar to
increase the amount of tryptophan getting to your brain and natural
plant material containing 25-50 mg harmine/harmaline to block MAO, all at the
same time, is supposed to cause your pineal gland to synthesize substantial
amounts of 5-MeO-DMT (Most 1986). This is extremely dangerous for persons
with existing amine imbalance or schizophrenia. For normal, healthy people
possible consequences are bad.

A potent inhibitor of INMT, which is a necessary enzyme for the synthesis
of DMT and 5-MeO-DMT, is found in particularly high concentrations in the
pineal gland. A bypassing or inhibition of the synthesis of this inhibitor
might be responsible for trances and other psychedelic states achieved
"without drugs" (Strassman 1990). See Strassman's article for more info and
speculation about the pineal gland.

Psychedelic Toads

Bufotenine and related 5-hydroxy-indolethylamines are common constituents
of venoms of the genera Hyla, Leptodactylus, Rana and Bufo. Bufotenine
is not psychedelic in reasonable doses (with larger doses there are
dangerous physiological side effects), but the skin of one species, Bufo
alvarius, contains 50-160 mg 5-MeO-DMT/g of skin (Daly & Witkop 1971).
It's the only Bufo species known to contain a hallucinogenic tryptamine
(McKenna & Towers 1984). Most (1984) gives instructions for collecting
and drying the venom:

Fresh venom can easily be collected without harm to the toad. Use a flat
glass plate or any other smooth, nonporous surface at least 12-inches
square. Hold the toad in front of the plate, which is fixed in a vertical
position. In this manner, the venom can be collected on the glass plate,
free of dirt and liquid released when the toad is handled.
When you are ready to begin, hold the toad firmly with one hand and, with
the thumb and forefinger of your other hand, squeeze near the base of the
gland until the venom squirts out of the pores and onto the glass plate. Use
this method to systematically collect the venom from each of the toad's
granular glands: those on the forearm, those on the tibia and femur of the
hind leg, and, of course, the parotoids on the neck. Each gland can be
squeezed a second time for an additional yield of venom if you allow the toad
a one-hour rest preiod. After this the glands are empty and require four to
to six weeks for regeneration.
The venom is viscous and milky-white in color when first squeezed from the
glands. It begins to dry within minutes and acquires the color and texture
of rubber cement. Scrape the venom from the glass plate, dry it thoroughly,
and store it in an airtight container until you are ready to smoke it.

Davis and Weil (1992) smoked the venom and described what happened:

In comparison to the pure compounds the toad venom appears longer lasting
and, because one does not completely lose contact with reality, far more
pleasant, even sensual. Shortly after inhalation I experienced warm flushing
sensations, a sense of wonder and well-being, strong auditory hallucinations,
which included an insect-cicada sound that ran across my mind and seemed to
link my body to the earth. Though I was indoors, there was a sense of the
feel of the earth, the dry desert soil passing through my fingers, the stars
at midday, the scent of cactus and sage, the feel of dry leaves through hands.
Strong visual hallucinations in orblike brilliance, diamond patterns that
undulated across my visual field. The experience was in every sense pleasant,
with no disturbing physical symptoms, no nausea, perhaps a slight sense of
increased heart rate. Warm waves coursed up and down my body. The effects
lasted only a few minutes but a pleasant afterglow continued for almost an
hour. (Wade Davis, personal observation, January 12, 1991)

Profound alteration of consciousness within a few seconds of exhaling. I
relax into a deep, peaceful interior awareness. There is nothing scary about
the effects and no sense of toxicity. I try to describe my feelings but am
unable to talk for the first five minutes and then only with some difficulty.
This is a powerful psychoactive drug, one that I think would appear to most
people who like the effects of hallucinogens. For the next hour I feel slow
and velvety, with a slight pressure in my head. No long-lasting effects to
report. (Andrew T. Weil, personal observation, January 12, 1991)

The Fungi

Family: Bolbitiaceae
Genus: Agrocybe
Species: farinacea

Contains psilocybin (Koike et al. 1981).

Genus: Conocybe
Species: cyanopus
kuehneriana
siligineoides
smithii

C. cyanopus (Benedict et al. 1962) and in C. smithii (Benedict et al. 1967)
contain psilocybin and psilocin while C. kuehneriana contains psilocin only
(Ohenoja et al. 1987). C. siligineoides may also contain these alkaloids
(Schultes & Hofmann 1979 p. 40).

Family: Coprinaceae
Genus: Copelandia
Species: anomala
bispora
cambodginiensis
cyanescens
tropicalis

All species contain psilocin and psilocybin, for C. cyanescens (Schultes
& Hofmann 1979 p. 40) and for C. cambodginiensis as well as C. tropicalis
(Arora, 1986), and for C. anomala as well as C. bispora (Merlin & Allen,
1993).

Genus: Panaeolina
Species: foenisecii

P. foenisecii contains psilocybin (Robbers et al. 1962).

Genus: Panaeolus
Species: antillarum
ater
campanulatus
firmicola
olivacens
papilionaceus
retirugis
separatus
sphinctrinus
subbalteatus

Several Panaeolus species contain psilocybin. For P. antillarum refer to
Allen et al. (1991), for P. ater refer to Bresinsky et al. (1990), for
P. papilionaceus (Gurevich et al. 1992), for P. retirugis (Fiussello et al.
1971/72), for P. separatus (Miller Jr. 1972), for P. sphinctrinus (Hein &
Wasson, 1958 p. 322) and for P. olivacens (Ohenoja et al. 1987).
P. subbalteatus contains both psilocin and psilocybin (Ohenoja et al. 1987)
but was known to be hallucinogenic since 1959 (Stein, 1959). P. firmicola
is also described as hallucinogenic and probably contains the same alkaloids
(Schultes, 1979).

Genus: Psathyrella
Species: candollenana

Contains psilocybin (Koike et al. 1981) and psilocin (Ohenoja et al. 1987).

Family: Cortinariaceae
Genus: Galerina
Species: steglichii

Contains psilocybin and psilocin (Besl, 1993).

Genus: Gymnopilus
Species: aeruginosus
liquiritiae
luteus
purpuratus
spectabilis
validipes
viridans

Many Gymnopilus contain psilocybin, for G. aeruginosus, G. luteus,
G. spectabilis, G. validipes and G.viridans refer to Hatfield et al.
(1978). For G. liquiritiae (Koike, 1981) and for G. purpuratus (Gartz 1991).

Genus: Inocybe
Species: aeruginascens
coelestium
corydalna
haemacta
tricolor

These contain psilocin and psilocybin, for P. aeruginascens refer to
Haeselbarth et al. (1985) and for the others Stijve et al. (1985).

Family: Pluteaceae
Genus: Pluteus
Species: atricapillus
nigroviridis
salicinus

P. atricapillus contains psilocybin (Ohenoja et al. 1987) while both
P. salicinus (Saupe 1981) and P. nigroviridis (Christiansen et al. 1984)
contain psilocin and psilocybin.

Family: Strophariaceae
Genus: Psilocybe
Species: 75 Known Hallucinogenic species +
aucklandii
coprophila
crobulus
samuiensis

There are at least 75 mushroom species in this genera that contain psilocin
and psilocybin in Guzman 1983, and there are several more recently discovered
species such as P. aucklandii (Guzman et al. 1993) and P. samuiensis (Guzman et
al. 1991). Also P. coprophila, while lacking psilocin (making it a non-blueing
psilocybe) is known to contain psilocybin (Arora, 1986). P. crobulus is also
known to be hallucinogenic (Phillips, 1981).

The Plants

Family: Acanthaceae
Genus: Justicia
Species: pectoralis (var. stenophylla)

Waikas of Orinoco headwaters in Venezuela add dried and pulverized
leaves of this herb to their Virola-snuff. Intensely aromatic smelling
leaves probably contain tryptamines (Schultes 1977). Plants are available
from ..Of the jungle (PO Box 1801 sebastopol CA 95473) for $35.

Family: Aizoaceae
Genus: Delosperma

Contains DMT and N-methyltryptamine (see Smith 1977 for references).

Family: Alariaceae
Genus: Ecklonia
Species: maxima

DMT is found in brown seaweed extract sold as Kelpak (Crouch et al. 1992).

Family: Apocynaceae
Genus: Prestonia
Species: amazonica?

Contains DMT (Smith 1977).

Family: Cactaceae
Genus: Echinocereus
Species: salm-dyckianus
triglochidiatus

These cacti growing in Mexico are known to Tarahumare Indians as peyote or
hikuli and used in their festivals. E. triglochidiatus contains a tryptamine
derivative, possibly 5-MeO-DMT (Bye 1979). E. salm-dyckianus is also supposed
to contain tryptamines according to Horus Botanicals catalog 1992.

Genus: Trichocereus
Species: terscheckii "Cardon grande"

DMT has been isolated from this species growing in North-Western
Argentina (Schultes & Hofmann 1979 p. 58).

Family: Caesalpininaceae
Genus: Petalostylis
species: cassiodies

Leaves and stem contain 0.4-0.5% tryptamine, DMT and other alkaloids
(Johns et al. 1966).

Family: Fabaceae
Genus: Desmodium
Species: gangetium
gyrans
tiliaefolium
triflorum

Leaves, root, stem and seeds contain DMT and 0.06% 5-MeO-DMT of wet weight
(Banerjee & Ghosal 1969).

Genus: Lespedeza
Species: bicolor

Leaves and root contain DMT and 5-MeO-DMT (Smith 1977). Seeds of this hardy
perennial shrub are available from ..Of the jungle for $5.

Genus: Mucuna
Species: pruriens

Leaves, stem and fruit of this jungle vine contains DMT and 5-MeO-DMT
(Smith 1977). Seeds are available from ..Of the jungle for $5.

Genus: Phyllodium
Species: pulchellum

Dried plant material produced 0.2% 5-MeO-DMT and small amounts of DMT (Ghosal &
Mukherjee 1966).

Family: Mimosaceae
Genus: Anadenanthera
species: colubrina
peregrina

Black beans from these trees are toasted, pulverized and mixed with ashes
or calcined shells to make psychedelic snuff called yopo by Indians in
Orinoco basin in Colombia, Venezuela and possibly in southern part of
Brasilian Amazon. Yopo is blown into the nostrils through bamboo tubes
or snuffed by birdbone tubes. The trees grow in open plain areas, and
leaves, bark and seeds contain DMT, 5-MeO-DMT and related compounds
(Schultes 1976,1977; Pachter et al. 1959).

Genus: Acacia
Species: confusa
jurema
maidenii
niopo
nubica
phlebophylla
polycantha subsp. campylacantha
senegal
simplicifolia

Dried A. confusa stems contain 0.04% N-methyltryptamine and 0.02% DMT
(Arthur et al. 1967). The dried leaves of A. phlebophylla contain 0.3% DMT
(Rovelli & Vaughan 1967). The bark of A. maidenii contains 0.6% of
N-methyltryptamine and DMT in the proportions approx. 2:3 (Fitzgerald
& Sioumis 1965). A. simplicifolia also contains DMT (Poupat et al. 1976).
Seeds of several acacia species are available from ..Of the jungle.

Genus: Desmanthus
Species: illinoensis "Illinois Bundleflower"

Thompson et al. report that the root bark of this North American perennial
shrub contains 0.34% DMT and 0.11% N-methyltryptamine. The bark accounts
for about a half of the total weight of the roots. The plant should be
resistant to cold and draught and easy to grow. ..Of the Jungle sells D.
illinoensis seeds and dried roots (seed packet $3, 7 grams $10, oz $25;
roots 4 oz $15, pound $50). Seeds are also available from more main-stream
mail-order houses.

Genus: Mimosa
Species: tenuiflora (== hostilis) "tepescohuite"
verrucosa

The roots of M. hostilis, which is not the common houseplant M. pudica
("sensitive plant"), contain 0.57% DMT and are used by Indians of Pernambuso
State in Brazil as part of their Yurema cult (Pachter et al. 1959, Schultes
1977, Meckes-Lozoya et al. 1990). Bark of M. verrucosa also contains DMT
(Smith 1977).

Family: Malpighiaceae
Genus: Banisteriopsis
Species: argentea
rusbyana

Natives of western Amazon add DMT-containing leaves of the vine B. rusbyana
to a drink made from B. caapi, which contains beta-carbolines harmine and
harmaline, to heighten and lengthen the visions (Schultes 1977, Smith 1977).

Family: Myristicaceae
Genus: Virola
Species: calophylla
calophylloidea
rufula
sebifera
theiodora

The bark resin of these trees is used to prepare hallucinogenic snuffs
in northwestern Brazil by boiling, drying and pulverizing it. Sometimes
leaves of a Justicia are added. The snuff acts rapidly and violently,
"effects include excitement, numbness of the limbs, twitching of facial
muscles, nausea, hallucinations, and finally a deep sleep; macroscopia is
frequent and enters into Waika beliefs about the spirits resident in the
drug." Snuffs made from V. theiodora bark contain up to 11% 5-MeO-DMT and
DMT. Also leaves, roots and flowers contain DMT.

Amazonian Colombia natives roll small pellets of boiled resin in a
evaporated filtrate of bark ashes of Gustavia Poeppigiana and ingest
them to bring on a rapid intoxication (Smith 1977, Schultes 1977).

Family: Pandanaceae
Genus: Pandanus "Screw pine"

DMT has been isolated from Pandanus nuts growing in New Guinea (Barrau 1958,
1962).

Family: Poaceae
Genus: Arundo
Species: donax

Leaves, flowers and rhizomes contain DMT, bufotenine and related compounds
(Ghosal et al. 1972).

Genus: Phalaris
Species: aquatica (tuberosa)
arundinacea

Leaves of P. arundinacea and leaves and seedlings of P. aquatica
contain DMT, 5-MeO-DMT and related compounds (Smith 1977). P.
arundinacea plants are available from ..Of the jungle for $15.

Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Psychotria
Species: carthaginensis
viridis (psychotriaefolia)

Psychotria leaves are added to a hallucinogenic drink prepared from
Banisteriopsis caapi and B. rusbyana (which contain beta-carbolines) to
strengthen and lengthen the effects in western Amazon. P. carthaginensis
and P. viridis both contain DMT (Rivier, 1972). 5 seeds of P. viridis
cost $10 from ..Of the jungle.

Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Dictyoloma
Species: incanescens

Bark contains 0.04% 5-MeO-DMT (Pachter et al. 1959).

Genus: Vepris
Species: ampody

Contains DMT (Smith 1977).

References

Arora, D. 1986. Mushrooms Demystified: A Comprehensive Guide to the Fleshy
Fungi. Ten Speed Press, Berkley.
Arthur, H.R., Loo, S.N. & Lamberton, J.A. 1967. Nb-methylated tryptamines
and other constituents of Acacia confusa Merr. of Hong Kong. Aust. J
Chem. 20, 811.
Banerjee, P.K. & Ghosal, S. 1969. Simple indole bases of Desmodium gangeticum.
Aust. J Chem. 22, 275.
Barrau, J. 1958. Nouvelles observations au sujet des plantes hallucinogenes
d'usage autochtone en Nouvelle-Guinee. J Agric. Trop. Bot. Appl. 5, 377-378.
Barrau, J. 1962. Observations et travaux recents sur les vegetaux
hallucinogenes de la Nouvelle-Guinee. J Agric. Trop. Bot. Appl. 9, 245-249.
Benedict, R.G., Brady, L.R., Smith, A.H. & Tyler, V.E. 1962. Occurrence of
psilocybin and psilocin in certain Conocybe and Psilocybe species. Lloydia
25, 156-159.
Benedict, R.G., Tyler, V.E. & Watling, R. 1967. Blueing in Conocybe, Psilocybe
and a Stropharia Species and the Dectection of Psilocybin. Lloydia 30(2),
150-157.
Besl, H. 1993. Galerina steglichii spec. nov., a hallucinogenic Galerina.
Zeitschrift fuer Mykologie 59(2), 215-218.
Bresinsky, A. & Besl, H. 1990. A Colour Atlas of Poisonous Fungi. Wolfe
Publishing Ltd, London.
Bye, R.A. 1979. Hallucinogenic plants of the Tarahumara. J.
Ethnopharmacology 1, 23-48.
Christiansen, A.L., Rasmussen, K.E. & Hoeiland, K. 1984. Detection of
psilocybin and psilocin in Norwegian species of Pluteus and Conocybe.
Planta Med. 50, 341-343.
Crouch, I.J., Smith M.T., Van Staden J., Lewis, M.J. & Hoad, G.V. 1992.
Identification of auxins in a commercial seaweed concentrate. J Plant
Physiology 139(5), 590-594.
Daly, J.W. & Witkop, B. 1971. Chemistry and pharmacology of frog venoms.
In: Venomous animals and their venoms. Vol II. New York: Academic Press.
Davis, W. & Weil, A.T. 1992. Identity of a New World Psychoactive Toad.
Ancient Mesoamerica 3 (1992) 5, 51-59.
Fitzgerald, J.S. & Sioumis, A.A. 1965. Alkaloids of Australian
Leguminosae V. Aust. J Chem. 18, 433.
Fiussello, N. & Ceruti-Scarti, J. 1971/72. Presenza di psilocibina edi
5-idrossi-indolderivati in Panaeolus retirugis. Atti Acc. Sci. Torino
106, 725-735.
Gartz, J. 1991. Influence of phosphate on fruiting and secondary metabolism
of mycelia of Psilocybe cubensis, Psilocybe semilanceata and Gymnopilus
purpuratus. Zeitschrift fuer Mykologie 57(1), 149-154.
Ghosal, S., Chaudhuri, R.K., Dutta, S.K. & Bhattacharya, S.K. 1972. Occurrence
of curaromimetic indoles in the flowers of Arundo donax. Planta Med. 21, 22.
Ghosal, S. & Mukherjee, B. 1966. Indole-3-alkylamine Bases of Desmodium
pulchellum. J, Org. Chem. 31, 2284.
Gurevich, L.S. 1993. Indole derivatives in certain Panaeolus species from East
Europe & Siberia. Mycological Research 97(2), 251-254.
Gurevich, L.S. & Astapenko, V.V. 1992. Chromatographic study of some indole
metabolites in Panaeolus basidiomycetes. Mikologiya I Fitopathologiga
26(3), 189-194.
Guzman, G. 1983. The Genus Psilocybe. Beihefte Zur Nova Hedwingia 74, 1-439.
Guzman, G., Bandala, V.M. & Allen, J.W. 1993. A New Bluing Psilocybe from
Thailand. Mycotaxon 26, 155-160.
Guzman, G., Bandala, V.M. & King, C. 1991. A New Species of Psilocybe of Section
Zapotecorum from New Zealand. Mycological Research 95, 507-508.
Haeselbarth, G., Michaelis, H. & Salnikow, J. 1985. Nachweis von Psilocybin in
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Hein, R. & Wasson, R.G. 1958. Les champignons hallucinogenes du Mexique.
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Australian Leguminosae VI. Aust. J Chem. 19, 893.
Kantor, R.E., Dudlettes, S.D. & Shulgin, A.T. 1980. 5-Methoxy-alfa-methyl-
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serotonin. Biological Psychiatry Vol 15, 349-352.
Koike, Y., Wada, K., Kusano, G., Nozoe, S., & Yokoyama, K. 1981. Isolation
of Psilocybin from Psilocybe argentipes and its Determination in Specimens
of some Mushrooms. Lloydia 44(3), 362-365.
Luna, L.E. 1984. The Healing Practices of a Peruvian Shaman. J.
Ethnopharmacology 11, 123-133.
McKenna, D.J., Towers, G.H.N., & Abbott, F. (1984). Monoamine oxidase
inhibitors in South American hallucinogenic plants: Tryptamines and
Beta-carboline constituents of ayahuasca. J Ethnopharmacology 10, 195-223.
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Meckes-Lozoya, M., Lozoya, X., Marles, R.J., Soucy-Breau, C., Sen, A. &
Arnason, J.T. 1990. N,N-dimethyltryptamine alkaloid in Mimosa tenuiflora
bark (tepescohuite). Arch. Invest. Med. Mex. 21(2), 175-7.
Merlin, M.D. & Allen, J.W. 1993. Species identification and chemical analysis
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venenosus Versus Psilocybe caerulescens Mushrooms. Mycologica 51, 49.
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baeocystin in the genus Inocybe. Persoonia 12, 469-472.
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--
[email protected] * Everything is perfect forever
Michael from Melbourne * Ditto
---
Paul Walsh
[email protected]

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SL (2ci)
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Username: 2ci

Post Number: 36
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 02:32 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ok thanks, I found a recipe at erowin using Syrian rue and mimosa hostilis. My concern now is that when searching for the herbs, I saw that Datura can be used as an ingredient. I have never done ayahuasca before but have done belladonas which I believe has the same active ingredient as Datura. I do not want to experience anything like a belladona trip (really bad stuff).

Has anyone done both Belladona and ayahuasca that can confirm their differences?

Thanks
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Hippie3 (Admin)
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Post Number: 10470
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 03:26 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

utterly different,
and i wouldn't add belladonna to my brew if i were you.
the traditional brew is the vine,
banisteriopsis caapi
and the bush,
psychotria viridis .
and might i suggest SEARCHING here for recipes ?
we have extensive files here on this very subject.
see http://archives.mycotopia.net/discus/messages/5/87787.html?1073662466
another excellent source of info is
http://www.ayahuasca.com/cgi-bin/index.pl
archive material FAQ

(Message edited by admin on January 09, 2004)
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SL (2ci)
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Username: 2ci

Post Number: 37
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 05:04 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks-

So I will boil 25 grams of caapi and 25 grams viridis 3 times for about 20 minutes each with 1 tables spoons of lemon juice in about 4 cups of water. Is this correct?
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Roo (Roo)
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Username: Roo

Post Number: 329
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 07:53 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sl,

stay away from the Datura man. I would do some serious digging on Ayahuasca. There is no one "Ayahuasca" brew, Ayahuasca is a generic term for a brew containing DMT that is active oraly. In order to make it active oraly you need to use an to use an MOA inhibitor, this destroys the substance in your gut that would normaly destroy the DMT. You also want this to be a short acting MOA inhibitor. Harmala seeds are are great for this. They are easy to get, they are used as incense in the middle east, Iran, India, etc. DMT is also very easy to get. There is a list of plants in the paper I posted earlier. It is one of the most common substances in nature. Your body produces massive amounts of DMT when you are born and on the day you die, so it is not something "alien" to us.

DNT is NOT to be underestimated. It is by far the most powerfull ethnogenic substance known to man. It is more powerfull than LSD and Shrooms in my opinion. It is truely a shamanic experiance. If you use any prescription meds you realy should consult your doctor before using an MOA inhibitor also.
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Hippie3 (Admin)
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Post Number: 10482
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 09:03 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So I will boil 25 grams of caapi and 25 grams viridis 3 times for about 20 minutes each with 1 tables spoons of lemon juice in about 4 cups of water. Is this correct?
shred the material well first,
i'd boil for longer,
more like 120 minutes each time,
then combine all 3 extractions & reduce to concentrate.
chug !
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Roo (Roo)
Senior Member
Username: Roo

Post Number: 333
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 09:08 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

SL,

Hold your nose when you chug, it helps as this stuff is pretty nasty.
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
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Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 315
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 10:25 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would recommend keeping it at the "almost" boiling point ( water beginning to "roll" a bit and give off some steam ) . A full-on boil may destroy some of the active alkaloids . Keep a close eye on the brew .....as it reduces , it will become hotter and boil harder , so you will have to turn the heat back slightly as you go ( or add a bit more water ) . I found good success with 3 extractions at 3 hrs each and then the final reduction . Do a search for some of "Leprachaun's" posts.....he did some meticulous research into this topic and posted lots of detailed info . I think Hippie put some of it in the archives . Some folks also don't combine the two components . They drink the Cappi first , wait about 1/2 hour or so , then drink the P. Viridis . The theory being that this would give the mao inhibitors a better chance to kick in before the DMT comes down the hatch . I would also check out Ayahuasca.com . Good luck with your brew !
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SL (2ci)
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Username: 2ci

Post Number: 39
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 12:42 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK-, I ordered the caapi and the viridis today and should receive them next week. I will add to this thread to describe the effects.

Thanks all-this is really the best site for support and information.

The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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PBeester (Pissybee)
Senior Member
Username: Pissybee

Post Number: 404
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 02:10 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry I didn't check this earlier, but if you'd like a more potent source of DMT than psychotria viridis, then you can use chaliponga or, best of all, mimosa hostilis rootbark. It has the most DMT of all the easily available plants. The Banisteriopsis Caapi is usually preferred for ayahuasca, over the syrian rue/peganum harmala, because it said to be more of an up, more pleasant buzz. It has to do with the ratios of harmala alkaloids. SR being higher in harmaline, where BC is higher in harmine and tetrahydroharmine, I believe.
PB
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SL (2ci)
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Username: 2ci

Post Number: 42
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 02:26 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Should I use more than 25 grams of the viridis or is 50/50 the right ratio, also my weight is 175 lbs, is this the right dosage?

Thanks
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
Senior Member
Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 316
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 02:59 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't worry- the caapi and viridis will be more than enough as far as potency goes . PB- I personally wouldn't really describe caapi and viridis ayahuasca as just an "up , more pleasant buzz " . That certainly is possible if brewed weakly or incorrectly or you have some ingredients that are unusually weak in alkaloid content .
Ayahuasca is not to be taken lightly , and it's certainly not a recreational drug , imo . If you obtain some quality ingredients and brew carefully with care and respect for this very powerful entheogen , you may be in for an incredibly out-of-this world experience . Ayahuasca also has an incredible potential for healing , both physical and psychological . I certainly had no idea of it's vast power when it caught me by surprise on my third brewing attempt.
Here's a link to the post I made the day after :
http://archives.mycotopia.net/discus/messages/15362/408 28.html?1065873317

SL : I also weigh 175 . 25 G each is probably a good point to begin with while you test the strength of your brew . Hippie had a good idea that I like to follow : make a double batch ....if it's too weak , you can always drink more !
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PBeester (Pissybee)
Senior Member
Username: Pissybee

Post Number: 408
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 03:04 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree about the dose being a good starting point, but what I meant was there is a difference in the effects if you choose the caapi over the Syrian Rue. People have described it as a more pleasant, gentler buzz then the rue. Maybe I didn't word it correctly, but what I was saying was stick with the Caapi, since it's the preferred way of the shaman and it's supposed to be more pleasant. Not trying to suggest it was a recreational substance, although, the buzz from harmala alkaloids alone isn't much more then just a buzz.
PB
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
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Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 317
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 03:16 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Agreed !
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SL (2ci)
Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 46
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 08:21 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Would it be better to do ayahuasca during the day or in the evening? Does one usually go to sleep afterwards?
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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polly ester (Carcenogenic)
Senior Member
Username: Carcenogenic

Post Number: 184
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 09:02 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

daytime is good to go into nature, the grass turns into a mandela, trees become gigantic chatholic alters,

at night i see more colors, rainbow patterns in the darkness, more things that are not there.

i prefer daytime because ayahuasca gives me lots of energy and i get to hike it out. but hey, it's all in your head.

follow your bliss.


xoxo
polly
enjoy your miracle!!
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
Senior Member
Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 319
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 09:07 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nightime is "traditional" . Sleeping afterwords would depend on the intensity of the experience . The trip might last anywhere from 2-4 hours , with possible nausea continuing beyond that . Don't have any commitments planned for the next day . IMO .
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 10580
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 09:51 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i like to take my brew early in the morning.
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 53
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 03:54 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

ok-I'm brewing as I type-will be ingesting arownd 4pm (I will get to experience it with the sun and the moon.

Thank all.
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 54
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 05:02 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This sound kinda dumb but I don't want to have a bad trip. I received and ounce of each caapi and the viridis this is about 28 grams. I should use all of it right-as the recommended dosage is 25 grams?
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 10969
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 05:40 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

yep, use it all.
in fact, it'd be better to have a double dose on hand as duds are quite common, so then one can split it or double up if needed.
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
Senior Member
Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 333
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 06:01 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good luck to you SL ! If you experience nausea , stay relaxed , puff a little weed . Let us know how it went !
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 55
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 11:16 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How long would it take to feel the effects? I took it 45 minutes ago and don't feel anything. I think I may have a dud as H3 stated. Is there a reputable supplier?

Thanks
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 10999
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Saturday, January 17, 2004 - 11:22 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

bouncing bear and icaro are my 2 favs

(Message edited by admin on January 17, 2004)
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Redmonk (Redmonk)
Senior Member
Username: Redmonk

Post Number: 335
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 12:10 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Got mine from Bouncing Bear....kicked ass !
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 56
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 12:35 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

by the way I got mine from http://store.yahoo.com/ethnogens/info.html

really suck-no effect at all.
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 57
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 12:48 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

does anyone think that since i drank the ayahuasca and it didn't have an effect if it would be wise to ingest orally some 5 meo dmt as it may be active orally-and if so-how much?

thanks
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 11009
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 01:00 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i'd be real cautious about ingesting anything for the next 24 hours or so, just in case of some MAOI activity.
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SL (2ci)
Intermediate Member
Username: 2ci

Post Number: 58
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2004 - 08:21 pm:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would like to add for the record that the supplier I mentioned above has agreed to send a replacement for both plants. I will provide a trip report then.
The only thing you take through those pearly gates is what you have given away....Marcia Moore
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Hippie3 (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 11206
Registered: 02-2001
Posted on Tuesday, January 20, 2004 - 02:02 am:Edit Post Quote Text Delete Post Print Post Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

good deal.

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