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The Heady Times - A Psychoactive News Stream


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#1 Sidestreet

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 07:00 AM

----------------------------------------------

THE HEADY TIMES

A Psychoactive News Stream

--------------------------

 

 

I can't believe this name wasn't taken!

 

In this thread I hope to bring you regular news stories about the psychoactives we know and love.  In keeping with fair use, I won't post whole stories.  Please feel free to discuss!  That also helps with fair use :biggrin:.

 

Kicking it off:

 

 

"Ayelet Waldman: How LSD micro-dosing saved my sanity and marriage"

 

By Martha Ross

For The Mercury News

 

 

The ‘micro-dose’ she slipped under her tongue was only 10 micrograms – a 10th of the usual recreational hit. Still, the effects were ever-so-slightly perceptible and almost immediate, a gentle lift in mood and in her awareness of things around her. “On a walk around my neighborhood, I noticed the beauty of my neighborhood, the trees and flowers, the smell of jasmine,” she recalled.

 

Most important for Waldman, her experimental use of this illegal psychedelic gave her something she had been desperately seeking for months: relief from a crippling depression that had left her feeling suicidal.

 

“For the first time in so long, I feel happy,” she said. “Not giddy or out of control, just at ease with myself and the world.”

...

So begins Waldman’s latest book, “A Really Good Day” (Alfred A. Knopf, $25.95, 229 pages). In it, the 52-year-old author recounts taking a small dose of LSD every three days for a month – a program that’s called “micro-dosing.” The regimen comes from James Fadiman, a Menlo Park-based psychologist who conducted pioneering studies on using psychedelics to boost creativity in Silicon Valley scientists and engineers in the mid-1960s.

 

Each day, Waldman recorded the effects on her mood, her writing and her relationships with her husband, author Michael Chabon, and their four children, ages 13 to 22. While Waldman only tried the regimen for a month, she was impressed enough with the results to write a book.

 

As a former federal public defender and drug law reform advocate — and as a someone who has struggled for years to find relief from debilitating mood swings — Waldman argues that U.S. prohibitions on psychedelics should be lifted so that people can have access to potentially life-saving relief from depression, PTSD and addiction.

...

“I was suicidal, and if I didn’t try something I was afraid that I would either kill myself, or make my life not worth living,” she said. “I would have either driven away my husband or left him myself out of some (sacrificial) gesture.”

...

Recent studies from Johns Hopkins, the nonprofit, Santa Cruz-based Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies and other institutions have produced “extremely high praise” from the scientific community, according to Fadiman. Participants, usually taking a psychedelic in combination with intense psychotherapy, have overcome PTSD and addiction to cocaine or have found relief from depression while facing terminal illness.

 

Micro-dosing has not been the subject of officially sanctioned research because it’s self-administered, said Fadiman. He has nonetheless collected reports from more than 120 people who say that the program has given them a sense of “joy and gratitude,” along with increased focus and better mood. A few stopped using because they didn’t enjoy it, he added.

More at http://www.mercuryne...y-and-marriage/


Edited by Sidestreet, 12 January 2017 - 07:01 AM.

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#2 Sidestreet

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 06:45 PM

"Air Force Loosens Marijuana Restrictions"

By Tom Angell

For Marijuana.com

1/10/17

 

 

At least one branch of the U.S. military is about to become a lot more cannabis-friendly.

 

In a policy memo issued Monday, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James wrote that going forward, prior marijuana use is “not disqualifying” for new recruits.

 

Previously, recruits entering the Air Force faced inconsistent questions and restrictions regarding prior marijuana consumption, depending on where they were enlisting.

 

“We didn’t ask the same questions. Some recruiters used if you smoked marijuana less than five times, sometimes it was less than 15 times,” Lt. Gen. Gina Grosso, the Air Force’s deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel and services, told Military.com. “What we decided to do is stop asking [about]prior marijuana use at the recruiter level, [because]first of all, who really counts how many times they’ve used marijuana? So that just comes off the table.”

 

In a press release announcing the new policy, the Air Force said that its former approach to recruits’ marijuana use was “not reflective of the continuing legalization of marijuana in numerous states throughout the nation.”

 

Under the new policy, “drug dependency” and prior “legal proceedings” associated with marijuana use will continue to be potentially disqualifying, as will any cannabis consumption following a recruit’s initial entrance interview.

http://www.marijuana...a-restrictions/


Edited by Sidestreet, 12 January 2017 - 06:45 PM.


#3 Sidestreet

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 05:37 AM

About Two-Thirds of Police Officers Believe that Marijuana Should Be Legal (At Least for Medical Use)

 

"Police Views, Public Views"

By Rich Morin, Kim Parker, Renee Stepler and Andrew Mercer

For the Pew Research Center

1/11/17

 

pew research marjiuana police.gif

 

 

As more jurisdictions move to decriminalize or legalize the private use of marijuana by adults, large majorities of the police and the public favor easing restrictions on the drug. However, a larger share of the public than police favor legalization of marijuana for personal and medical use (49% vs. 32%).

 

Overall, about seven-in-ten officers support allowing medical use of marijuana (37%) or favor the legalization of the drug for both personal and medical use (32%). The public is more favorably inclined than police toward relaxing marijuana laws; more than eight-in-ten Americans support either legalizing marijuana (49%) or allowing only medical use of the drug (35%).

 

The surveys found little support among the public for outlawing marijuana use under any circumstances (15%). However, police are twice as likely as all adults to favor an outright ban on the drug (30%).

 

As with younger adults generally, officers younger than 35 are more likely than those ages 50 to 60 to favor permitting personal and medical use of marijuana (37% vs. 27%). Among the public, a majority of adults (63%) under the age of 45 favor legalization.

http://www.pewsocial...s-public-views/


Edited by Sidestreet, 13 January 2017 - 05:39 AM.

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#4 Sidestreet

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 07:58 AM

"The Sunshine Makers Documentary Offers a Thrilling Look at the History of LSD" [with Trailer]

 

By the Irish Examiner

1/13/17

 

 

When people think of LSD they tend to think of the 1960s, the decade the chemical compound was made famous by young people across the world trying to make change.

 

Two people who realised the “consciousness-raising power” of LSD, and did everything in their power to get the drug to as many people as possible, were Nicholas Sand and Tim Scully.

Now the story of these two underground chemists is being told through feature documentary The Sunshine Makers.

 

Together Nick and Tim produced huge quantities of Orange Sunshine acid, and even managed to get it to soldiers on the front lines.

“It’s a great film,” Amanda Feilding, the Beckley Foundation founder, told us. Amanda’s son Cosmo Feilding Mellen is responsible for the documentary. “Great steaming cauldrons of LSD, and they’re doing it with the best motives in the world.

 

“They’re two sets of completely opposite personalities – with Tim Scully being this, sort of, asperger’s genius, but determined, having had this experience, that this thing will change the world.”

The film hits iTunes and cinemas across the US on January 27, and while there’s currently no release date for the UK, Amanda said we can expect The Sunshine Makers to find its way on to Netflix.

https://www.irishexa...lsd-439094.html


Edited by Sidestreet, 14 January 2017 - 07:59 AM.

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#5 Sidestreet

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 08:55 AM

"In a race against extinction, rusty patched bumble bee is listed as endangered"

 

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Newsroom

1/10/17

 

 

Once common and abundant across 28 states from Connecticut to South Dakota, the District of Columbia and two Canadian provinces, the rusty patched bumble bee has experienced a swift and dramatic decline since the late 1990s. Abundance of the rusty patched bumble bee has plummeted by 87 percent, leaving small, scattered populations in 13 states and one province.

...

Since 2000, rusty patched bumble bees have been reported in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. Some populations are so small that it is unclear whether they still exist.

 

Causes of the decline in rusty patched bumble bee populations are believed to be loss of habitat; disease and parasites; use of pesticides that directly or indirectly kill the bees; climate change, which can affect the availability of the flowers they depend on; and extremely small population size. Most likely, a combination of these factors has caused the decline in rusty patched bumble bees.

...

More information about the rusty patched bumble bee, the rule listing it as endangered, and ways to help this species and other pollinators is available at https://www.fws.gov/...rpbb/index.html

https://www.fws.gov/...t/news/861.html


Edited by Sidestreet, 16 January 2017 - 08:56 AM.


#6 dead_diver

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 04:12 PM

That movie came out in 2015?

#7 Sidestreet

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 06:00 AM

It looks like it's coming out in theaters and on demand over the next couple of weeks:  http://filmrise.com/sunshinemakers/

 

I remembered reading about it when it was being made but then I didn't hear anything again until now.  Maybe I'll finally get to see it!


Edited by Sidestreet, 17 January 2017 - 06:00 AM.

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#8 Sidestreet

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 06:13 AM

"When Are You Too Stoned to Drive?"

By Beth Schwartzapfel

For The Marshall Project

1/16/17

 

 

Still, laws in 18 states tie drugged driving charges to whether drivers have THC (or related compounds) in their blood. Some states prohibit driving with any amount, and some specify a threshold modeled after the .08 limit states use for blood alcohol. But the lag time between being pulled over and being transported to a hospital for a blood draw — on average, more than two hours — can lead to false negatives, while the tolerance developed by regular users (and the tendency for THC to stick around in their bloodstreams) can lead to false positives. This is why, researchers say, blood THC laws make little sense.
...

The more sensible strategy appears to be prohibiting driving while high, and 31 states take this approach. But proving that a driver is high turns out to be tricky terrain, too.

One of the issues that Thomas Gerhardt raises in his lawsuit is whether police officers with standard training are qualified to make a judgment that a driver is high. Courts in a few states, including New Jersey, Vermont, and Montana, have ruled that they are not. “Unlike alcohol intoxication,” the New Jersey high court ruled in 2006, “no…general awareness exists as yet with regard to the signs and symptoms of the condition described as being ‘high’ on marijuana.”

 

Research shows that failing a standard field sobriety test (a series of tasks like walking a straight line) correlates closely with having a blood alcohol level above the legal limit — plus officers have a breathalyzer to confirm their findings. But “the gap between assessment, cannabis use, and driving is really not completely closed,” says Professor Thomas Marcotte of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California-San Diego. Frequent pot users — even when they’re not stoned — may not be able to stand on one leg, for example, whether they’re safe to drive or not. Marcotte and his colleagues are working on validating a new field sobriety test calibrated for pot use. Their iPad-based measures test skills like tracking an object on the screen and accurately estimating time.

 

Some police departments use drug recognition experts, specially trained officers dispatched to evaluate suspected drugged drivers. Commonly referred to as DREs, these officers use an hour-long 12-step process, including taking the suspect’s blood pressure and pulse, conducting several eye exams and balance tests, to generate an opinion about whether the driver is intoxicated, and, if so, by what. Preliminary research seems to indicate their opinions are of mixed quality, and not all judges allow DREs to testify to their findings. “They’re not EMTs. They’re not medically trained,” says Lovrich, the Washington State University professor, who, in a recent study of five years of DRE data in Washington and New Mexico, found a false-positive rate for pot intoxication ranging from 38 percent to 68 percent. “Everyone in the DRE business knows it’s really hard to do this.”

https://www.themarsh...rive#.Zk24TNOzw

 

Stoned driving laws by state:

state driving stoned laws.gif


Edited by Sidestreet, 17 January 2017 - 06:14 AM.


#9 Sidestreet

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 06:36 AM

Let's make this thread participatory.  Please feel free to post news here if you've got something that doesn't need its own thread.

 

I've been doing it like this:

 

"Title" [18 point]

 

By [author]

For [publication]

[date]

 

 

[story]

[link to source - 10 point]

 

It doesn't matter if yours is just like that though.  :)


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#10 Alder Logs

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 10:59 AM

 

"When Are You Too Stoned to Drive?"

 

I haven't smoked pot in years.  I no longer drink.  I have a chronic balance problem (doesn't affect me when sitting or driving) and long hair and beard, and I drive.    Any positive would be a false positive.


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#11 Sidestreet

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 04:12 AM

Off-balance, long hair and a beard?  Well, at least you'll never get profiled.  ;)


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#12 Sidestreet

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 06:34 AM

"The Cannabis Industry Was Worth $53-Billion Last Year - Just Wait Until It's Legal In Every State"

 

By Mark Leger

For Civilized.

1/17/17

 

 

Here's a compelling argument to legalize cannabis countrywide: according to new data released by Arcview Market Research, the estimated value of the industry in 2016 was $53.3-billion. Only $6.9-billion of that figure was for legal, regulated markets - the rest (87 percent) was the value of black-market sales.

 

“The enormous amount of existing, if illicit, consumer spending sets cannabis apart from most other major consumer-market investment opportunities throughout history,” said Troy Dayton, CEO of Arcview Market Research, in a press release.

 

“In contrast to comparable markets with fast growth from zero to tens of billions in recent decades such as organic foods, home video, mobile, or the internet, the cannabis industry doesn’t need to create demand for a new product or innovation - it just needs to move demand for an already widely-popular product into legal channels.” 

 

As more states legalize, the black market will shrink as a percentage of the entire industry. With the four new adult-use markets (California, Massachusetts, Nevada and Maine) soon adopting regulated markets, Arcview expects black market trade to drop from 87 percent to 67 percent of the total market by 2021.

https://www.civilize...rth-53-billion/



#13 Alder Logs

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:48 AM

 

 

When mankind loses sight of the Way, laws are made.

~Taoist Philosophy

 

You can almost smell the corruption coming.   Washington State's legal pot law seems custom made for corruption to bloom.  It will be interesting to watch the states as they do their legislative magic.



#14 Sidestreet

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 07:16 PM

Washington State's legal pot law seems custom made for corruption to bloom.


How so?

Edited by Sidestreet, 18 January 2017 - 07:45 PM.


#15 Alder Logs

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 08:11 PM

I don't remember the details but it was the fact that only a few will get the concession to do the growing for the state.   Everyone else will be relegated to be the modern incarnations of moonshiners, and the state will supply the revenuers.  Having a few plants will likely be the equivalent of operating a still.    To some it's a sacrament. To others, medicine. To the powers that are, it's money, and they own the cops!


Edited by Alder Logs, 18 January 2017 - 08:11 PM.

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#16 Sidestreet

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 05:39 AM

Ah OK, that sounds like the bill Ohio shot down.  It restricted growing rights to an oligopoly...total garbage.  Well, there's the next fight in line for WA activists I suppose.

 

As long as the home-growers aren't going to be prosecuted there's a big fat silver lining.  Rome wasn't burned in a day!



#17 Sidestreet

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 05:46 AM

"24,000 Defendants Get a New Chance at Justice in Drug-Lab Scandal"

 

By Christie Thompson

For the Marshall Project

1/18/17

 

 

...It wasn’t until years later that he found out that his conviction — which prompted his months in detention and exile from the U.S. — was invalid in the first place. And it wasn’t just his. Thousands of cases were tainted by the admission of a drug-lab chemist that she had faked many of her results.

...

On Wednesday, the top court in Massachusetts, which had been grappling with what to do about those thousands of drug cases, ruled unanimously that the so-called Dookhan defendants could seek new trials. It did not go so far as to vacate their sentences but said that defendants would not face added charges or sentences more severe than the original ones. And it directed prosecutors to abandon cases that they “would not or could not re-prosecute if a new trial were ordered.” The American Civil Liberties Union had argued they should all be dismissed, while district attorneys wanted to review them one by one, as petitions arise.

...

Since the scandal broke four years ago, roughly 1,500 cases have been addressed — and around 24,000 remain.

...

And the problem is hardly limited to Massachusetts, as similar scandals and faulty test results arise in other states, including New Jersey and Texas.

https://www.themarsh...ndal#.FbrNfq0U9

 

WOW.  That is revolting...and wonderful that the truth has surfaced. 



#18 wildedibles

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 05:14 PM

"In a race against extinction, rusty patched bumble bee is listed as endangered"
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Newsroom
1/10/17
 

 
Once common and abundant across 28 states from Connecticut to South Dakota, the District of Columbia and two Canadian provinces, the rusty patched bumble bee has experienced a swift and dramatic decline since the late 1990s. Abundance of the rusty patched bumble bee has plummeted by 87 percent, leaving small, scattered populations in 13 states and one province.
...
Since 2000, rusty patched bumble bees have been reported in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. Some populations are so small that it is unclear whether they still exist.
 
Causes of the decline in rusty patched bumble bee populations are believed to be loss of habitat; disease and parasites; use of pesticides that directly or indirectly kill the bees; climate change, which can affect the availability of the flowers they depend on; and extremely small population size. Most likely, a combination of these factors has caused the decline in rusty patched bumble bees.
...
More information about the rusty patched bumble bee, the rule listing it as endangered, and ways to help this species and other pollinators is available at https://www.fws.gov/...rpbb/index.html

https://www.fws.gov/...t/news/861.html

I have these in my garden :) They love my oragano bushes they stay on it day and night till the fowers are done.... I wondered why these ones have an orange mark on them I have only seen regular bumble bees before not thee orange marked ones till I seen my oragano bush in full bloom :) ....its easy to make more oragano bushes so I will plant some more come spring along with more mints and cat nips :)
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#19 Sidestreet

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 05:54 AM

I know the bumble-puppies will appreciate you, Wild!

 

 

This next article shows why mere decriminalization isn't going far enough:

 

"Marijuana odor justifies warrantless vehicle search, Court of Appeals rules" [Maryland]

 

By Justin Fenton

For The Baltimore Sun

1/21/17

 

 

Though possession of small amounts of marijuana has been decriminalized in Maryland, it remains a banned substance and gives police probable cause to search a vehicle, the state's highest court has ruled.

 

"Simply put, decriminalization is not synonymous with legalization, and possession of marijuana remains unlawful," Court of Appeals Judge Shirley M. Watts wrote in a unanimous opinion issued Friday.

The case was brought on behalf of three men whose vehicles were searched after police officers said they smelled marijuana, leading to the discovery of more drugs.

 

The searches had been previously upheld by trial courts and the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, but attorneys for the appellants argued before the Court of Appeals that police should be required to cite factors that give them reason to believe the amount they smell is larger than 10 grams. The smell of marijuana indicates only its presence, not its amount, they argued.

 

 

The General Assembly passed a law in 2014 that made possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana a civil offense that carries a $100 fine. The fine climbs to $500 for repeat offenses.

http://www.baltimore...0120-story.html


Edited by Sidestreet, 23 January 2017 - 05:54 AM.


#20 Sidestreet

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 06:02 AM

"Germany Legalizes Cannabis Prescriptions"

 

By Duke London

For Marijuana.com

1/19/17

 

 

Big news from the Associated Press out of Berlin this morning, as lawmakers in Germany passed a bill that would legalize the prescribing of marijuana as a medicine.

The new legislation was approved unanimously early Thursday morning by the lower house of Parliament and will go into effect in March.

 

This milestone ruling only applies to seriously ill patients, however, and doesn’t legalize any forms of recreational consumption or cultivation. Before the new law was passed, roughly 1,000 German patients had applied for special authorization to use cannabis and been approved, but those numbers should rise significantly.

 

According to Germany’s Health Minister Hermann Groehe, “Seriously ill people must be cared for in the best way possible” and that includes allowing the public health system to fund cannabis prescriptions for patients “if they cannot effectively be helped any other way.”

 

Now that cannabis is legal for doctors in Germany to prescribe, the next issue is finding some.

 

For now, the German Government is saying prescriptions will be filled with cannabis imported from other countries, but as demand escalates they will have to find an alternative solution.

http://www.marijuana...-prescriptions/


Edited by Sidestreet, 23 January 2017 - 06:02 AM.

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