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The Heady Times - A Psychoactive News Stream


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#21 TVCasualty

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 09:01 AM

"The Cannabis Industry Was Worth $53-Billion Last Year - Just Wait Until It's Legal In Every State"
 
https://www.civilize...rth-53-billion/

 

When that happens, what I've taken to calling the "Canna-bubble" will probably burst and revenues will plummet.

 

It's only currently as expensive as it is because it's still mostly-illegal. And the only way to keep it as expensive as it is under full legalization would be by taxing the hell out of it.

 

But that won't work since it's too easy to grow a plant or two, and excessive taxes will inspire a lot of people to do just that (but if they are prohibited from growing their own then that means it's not fully legalized yet so this would not apply).


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#22 wildedibles

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 10:42 AM

ya its gonna be crazy .......right now my medicinal is more ....its kinda the same but more ....hope the price comes down when its totally legal here .......I have read that in Canada we can grow our own but sooo many rules and unexpected visits ...na well maybe ...ya na .....see what happens .... I agree in the middle of Countrys making it legal or partialy legal there is gonna be confusion until it becomes totally legal or totally illigal again .......There will still be tax money made like with reg smokes or booze

#23 Sidestreet

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 12:26 PM

In Michigan they are implementing new laws regulating medical dispensaries, requiring the payment of heavy fees and implementing "seed to sale" tracking of meds. One observer was guessing that the laws will drive prices up as costs get passed to patients. All the more reason to home grow!

On the upside, the dispensary owners will now be protected by the law, whereas they only exist today because localities decide to tolerate them.  Where the local government doesn't tolerate them, the people who try to open them are charged with possession with intent to deliver.


Edited by Sidestreet, 29 January 2017 - 07:38 AM.

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#24 Sidestreet

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 05:53 AM

"New undergraduate think tank explores psychedelics" [Yale]

 

By Kevin Lin

For the Yale Daily News

1/20/17

 

 

Four students have established the Yale Undergraduate Think Tank, an organization that purports to make students aware of infrequently-discussed ideas that have “the potential to greatly affect the human experience” — starting with psychedelic drugs.

 

The four-person organization began with the realization that there are a wide range of topics being researched but not under discussion by Yale undergraduates, according to president John Koch ’19.

“Weirdly enough, it all fell into our laps this past semester,” said J. Joseph ’19, creative director for the organization. “We took courses on Buddhism and American counterculture, so thoughts on psychedelics and the potential for spiritual healing and ideas for spiritual growth very much came to us.”

 

While Yale students have previously established thought incubators, they have focused on debate rather than providing information to inform policy decisions, Koch added.

“There are a couple of key issues that we want to raise awareness for undergraduates, the first one being psychedelics,” said Koch. “There was promising research in the mid-to-late ’90s about using psychedelics to treat addiction, PTSD and end-of-life anxiety, so this semester the theme is psychedelics.”

...

According to a media release, the group’s main activity is to host speakers at events designed to engage undergraduates. Yesterday, the group hosted its first speaker: Rick Doblin, founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a nonprofit organization that aims to increase understanding of psychedelic substances.

 

According to the release, future speakers include Alex Grey, a visionary artist, as well as members from a New York University research group studying psilocybin, the active ingredient in a type of mushroom that can reportedly induce mystical or spiritual states of consciousness.

 

http://yaledailynews...s-psychedelics/

 

Rick Doblin and Alex Grey?  Good for them...it's good to see college students in an "elite" school exploring this topic.  Hopefully they find themselves directing policy someday!


Edited by Sidestreet, 25 January 2017 - 05:55 AM.

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#25 Sidestreet

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 02:12 PM

"Magic Mushrooms as Mental Health Treatment"

 

By Lisa Esposito

For U.S. News and World Report

1/27/17

 

 

Sherry Marcy, 74, a former mathematician in Ann Arbor, Michigan, felt little relief after completing treatment for stage 3 endometrial cancer in late 2010. Marcy says her therapy included "a whole bunch of chemo and a whole bunch of radiation" and surgery that left behind troublesome scar tissue. "I came out of the whole thing completely depressed," she says. "I had no feeling that I wouldn't get cancer again."

 

Although Marcy had a devoted partner, and a daughter and son making their way in college and grad school, she felt disconnected from family as she dwelt on the physical costs of her treatment. Mentally, she couldn't concentrate enough to read much and felt "dumbed down."

An April 2012 New York Times story caught Marcy's attention: It described research using psychedelic drugs to help late-stage cancer patients reduce their fear of death. The consuming anxiety and depression detailed in the story echoed her own.

 

Marcy learned about an ongoing study at Johns Hopkins University using psilocybin for cancer patients with persistent, treatment-resistant depression. Marcy, who had never tried psychedelic drugs recreationally – she didn't disapprove; it just wasn't her thing – experienced her first drug trip as a study volunteer.

Under supervision, in a living room-like setting with comfortable furniture and attractive artwork, Marcy reclined on a couch wearing noise-canceling headphones and eyeshades, listening to music. "And they fed me grapes when I got thirsty," she says. "My, God, they tasted good."

 

For Marcy, the mystical aspect of her trip involved musings around math – imaginary numbers and patterns related to fractal geometry. In essence, she says, "It felt like I picked up my head and started looking around again. [The session] got me in touch with things I couldn't have accessed before. It was like it lit up my head, which was delightful."

The study involved two sessions, two weeks apart. Participants received a low-dose psilocybin capsule in one six-hour session and a higher-dose capsule in the other. "At the end of five hours, I remember saying, 'I don't know if this is a high dose or a low dose, but it's enough," Marcy recalls. Nearly five years later, Marcy's depression appears to be gone for good.

 

http://health.usnews...ealth-treatment


Edited by Sidestreet, 28 January 2017 - 02:12 PM.

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#26 Sidestreet

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 05:44 AM

"An object lesson in what not to do when you find a big bale of cocaine in the ocean"

 

 

Sentencing Law and Policy

1/28/17

 

 

 

 

Cocaine, more so than any other narcotic, is the drug most frequently interdicted by the U.S. Coast Guard. In late 2016, the Coast Guard announced it had seized about $2 billion worth of cocaine during a 10-week operation that began in October. (At 26.5 tons, the weight of the seized stimulant rivaled the bulk of four African bull elephants.) Water is the route of choice for drug runners. Some 95 percent of cocaine smuggling operations, a Coast Guard rear admiral told the BBC in 2015, involves traveling via boat.

 

In the Gulf Coast, a container vessel or freighter may serve as a mother ship, which offloads the drug to sailboats, go-fast cigarette boats, fishing boats and other smaller boats. “Fishermen are great mules because they know the waters and they don’t draw attention,” wrote journalist Erik Vance at Slate in 2013. “And if you have to chuck your haul overboard to avoid the military, other fishermen can dive to retrieve it.” And if the divers sent after the contraband cannot find it, perhaps someone else will.

 

In 2016, that someone else was Thomas Zachary Breeding. Breeding, 32, was a longline fisherman from Panama City, Fla. The fisherman had accumulated a few run-ins with the law, including drug and gun convictions, the Panama City News Herald reported. In 2012, a federal grand jury indicted Breeding for giving false statements to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Prosecutors also alleged he obstructed the agency’s investigation into why the fisherman had entered grouper spawning grounds, closed to fishing; Breeding, they argued, deliberately sought to catch a valuable species of fish called gag grouper. He was sentenced to 15 months in prison.

 

But, until Breeding found the 45-pound cocaine bale, the fisherman said that he had kept a previously clean slate when it came to the narcotics trade. “I do not know where the drugs came from and haven’t ever been involved in the drug trade before. I was just a hard-working, young commercial fisherman,” Breeding wrote recently in a letter to the News Herald, penned from Florida’s Washington County Jail. “I was working as a long line boat captain out of Panama City when I found a package containing 20 kilos of cocaine.”

 

It was a what-if scenario of the type that fuels Florida crime potboilers: A fisherman finds a package of drugs valued at a huge street sum, and makes a decision. In Breeding’s case, he was 50 miles south of Panama City when he found between $500,000 and $650,000 of cocaine floating in the gulf. As impressive as the sum was, in the annals of washed-ashore cocaine — white lobster, as villagers along the Central American coast euphemize it — its street value was not a record. In 2013, five fishermen found $2.5 million of cocaine in the waters off north Florida. A metal tube filled with an estimated $5 million worth of cocaine washed up in Ireland last summer.

 

But it was an object lesson in what not to do. In December, Mark “The Shark” Quartiano, a celebrity Miami fisherman, found a kilogram brick of cocaine. He promptly alerted the authorities. Breeding did not. He instead handed over the 45-pound haul to four other people, on the condition they would sell the cocaine and pay a cut to Breeding. All five were caught in the summer — Breeding, a felon, had a firearm in his car when he was arrested — and faced conspiracy charges for the distribution of a controlled substance. Breeding pleaded guilty Wednesday, the News Herald reported, as did the other members of the network; they are awaiting a Feb. 16 sentencing. Breeding may be punished with up to life imprisonment and a fine in the millions of dollars.

http://sentencing.ty...-the-ocean.html



#27 Heirloom

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 12:53 PM

I am surprised I didn't find this topic until this morning.

For those interested in " The Sunshine Makers " it's on amazon for rent @ 4.99 and 12.99 to own a HD disc.

 Sand and Scully are like hero's to me so I am buying a copy when I get paid.


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#28 riseabovethought

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 03:33 PM

Alder Logs, on 17 Jan 2017 - 09:59 AM, said:




I haven't smoked pot in years. I no longer drink. I have a chronic balance problem (doesn't affect me when sitting or driving) and long hair and beard, and I drive. Any positive would be a false positive.


Sounds like Hippie talk to me. Can you say your alphabet backwards? Count from 99 backwards to zero.
Let me see those pupils. Red eyes, blood shot like you been up all night. Thats it! You're busted beardy!

Here's top ten secrets of the fib, number ten is hair analysis no longer holds up

[Direct Link]


Edited by riseabovethought, 31 January 2017 - 03:02 PM.

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#29 Sidestreet

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 04:26 PM

I am surprised I didn't find this topic until this morning.

For those interested in " The Sunshine Makers " it's on amazon for rent @ 4.99 and 12.99 to own a HD disc.

 Sand and Scully are like hero's to me so I am buying a copy when I get paid.

 

 

Welp, I know what I'm watching tonight...


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#30 Heirloom

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 05:18 PM

Please tell us if you like it.



#31 Sidestreet

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 05:54 AM

Great movie!  It was even well-made.  I can't believe Nick Sand actually escaped and went on working for 20 years--and then didn't do much more time than Scully did!  Nick Sand definitely wins.  Even that FBI agent said he beat the system.

 

 

"Do Sports Fans Care If Pro Athletes Use Marijuana?"

By Duke London

For Marijuana.com

1/31/17

 

 

 

organizations like the NFL and the Nevada State Athletic Commission are exploring their options as well, as many athletes have become vocal about their displeasure with opiate-based treatment and their desire to have freedom of choice when it comes to their bodies.

 

On Michael Rapaport’s podcast last Friday, former NBA star Stephen Jackson went as far as saying he used to light up before games.

 

“I just gotta be real, you know, it’s been a couple games where I smoked before games and had great games,” the 14-year veteran told Rapaport.

Apparently, Jackson wasn’t the only player partaking, and at least one prominent coach knew about the alternative pain-relief regimen. The former NBA champion went on to add that Hall of Famer Don Nelson, Jackson’s coach while playing with the Golden State Warriors, hilariously approached the subject one time after a team drug screening.

 

“We’re in Utah, and the [league’s] drug test people are around, you know, to get our last drug test so we can smoke, right? Don Nelson, we talked about weed all the time. He was cool with talking about weed. We got our last test in Utah, right? So me and [teammate]Baron [Davis] are coming out the locker room just screaming, excited with our last pink slip saying we could smoke for the rest of the season, and Don Nelson hauls ass down there giving us high-fives, like, ‘Yeah, we can smoke now!'” Jackson remembered. “It was cool, the fact that he knows what’s going on off the court with his players, which was great, man. We enjoyed it. That’s why we were a great team.”

http://www.marijuana...-use-marijuana/


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#32 TVCasualty

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 01:52 PM

"An object lesson in what not to do when you find a big bale of cocaine in the ocean"

 

 

Sentencing Law and Policy

1/28/17

 

http://sentencing.ty...-the-ocean.html

 

 

He got lucky. Luck is relative, of course.

 

The father of an acquaintance of mine used to run weed from Texas to Florida in the 80's in his sailboat, and his partner was hanging out at home on his porch late one evening when his house was almost hit by a Cessna (not really, but it apparently was low enough to make him instinctively duck as it passed!). His house was a mile or so inland from the coast and there was no one else around as the northern Gulf coast hadn't been developed much yet (so was a good place to be low-profile with a house hidden in the swampy wetlands).

 

The plane was being chased by the Coast Guard, and as it flew over his house he saw things falling from it. He investigated and eventually recovered 5 bundles of coke that were about 50 pounds each. He stashed them in a detached garage next to his house and called my acquaintance, who took one bundle off his hands that same night to sell for some quick cash (and a LOT at that, so why wait?).

 

When my acquaintance returned two days later for more bundles (since the buyers were quite eager to buy them all at the below-market rate he was selling them for) his friend's wife was not very pleased to see him (to put it mildly) and informed him that a few hours after he'd left with the first bundle, she went out to the garage to check on her husband since he hadn't come to bed and found him dead and the bundles gone. When the cops showed up and ruled it a homicide (since his throat had been slit they figured it probably wasn't suicide) they damned well knew what had happened since they were fully aware of the chase that had occurred right over the property.

 

The most disturbing part of the story is that due to peculiar details surrounding these events, it was in all likelihood the agents who'd been chasing the smugglers that "recovered" the haul since none of it ever ended up on the news.

 

The moral of these stories is that people don't simply forget about million-dollar shipments of cocaine when forced to dump 'em, and you don't want whoever shows up (and someone will, probably within hours) to find any of it stashed in your garage, or car, or boat, or pocket. And if he hadn't stored it in a detached garage located some distance from the house then his wife would've likely been killed as well.

 

So if you ever find bundles of coke somewhere out of place, run like hell and don't look back.


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#33 wildedibles

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 01:50 PM

"Magic Mushrooms as Mental Health Treatment"
 
By Lisa Esposito
For U.S. News and World Report
1/27/17
 


 

Sherry Marcy, 74, a former mathematician in Ann Arbor, Michigan, felt little relief after completing treatment for stage 3 endometrial cancer in late 2010. Marcy says her therapy included "a whole bunch of chemo and a whole bunch of radiation" and surgery that left behind troublesome scar tissue. "I came out of the whole thing completely depressed," she says. "I had no feeling that I wouldn't get cancer again."
 


Although Marcy had a devoted partner, and a daughter and son making their way in college and grad school, she felt disconnected from family as she dwelt on the physical costs of her treatment. Mentally, she couldn't concentrate enough to read much and felt "dumbed down."


An April 2012 New York Times story caught Marcy's attention: It described research using psychedelic drugs to help late-stage cancer patients reduce their fear of death. The consuming anxiety and depression detailed in the story echoed her own.



 



Marcy learned about an ongoing study at Johns Hopkins University using psilocybin for cancer patients with persistent, treatment-resistant depression. Marcy, who had never tried psychedelic drugs recreationally – she didn't disapprove; it just wasn't her thing – experienced her first drug trip as a study volunteer.


Under supervision, in a living room-like setting with comfortable furniture and attractive artwork, Marcy reclined on a couch wearing noise-canceling headphones and eyeshades, listening to music. "And they fed me grapes when I got thirsty," she says. "My, God, they tasted good."

 

For Marcy, the mystical aspect of her trip involved musings around math – imaginary numbers and patterns related to fractal geometry. In essence, she says, "It felt like I picked up my head and started looking around again. [The session] got me in touch with things I couldn't have accessed before. It was like it lit up my head, which was delightful."


The study involved two sessions, two weeks apart. Participants received a low-dose psilocybin capsule in one six-hour session and a higher-dose capsule in the other. "At the end of five hours, I remember saying, 'I don't know if this is a high dose or a low dose, but it's enough," Marcy recalls. Nearly five years later, Marcy's depression appears to be gone for good.

http://health.usnews...ealth-treatment

good news this is a much better way to face possible end of life depression.......we need to start somewhere the more and more good science comes from this the better ....... facing what is depressing you in a helpful setting is a great way to fight depression ;)
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#34 Sidestreet

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 07:14 AM

"A man who took magic mushrooms for a scientific study said it helped him see a basic truth about relationships"

 

By Erin Brodwin

For Business Insider (Re-printed in the San Francisco Gate)

2/3/17

 

 

 

Over the next 20 years, as his daughter took her first steps, experienced her first day of school, and eventually grew into a smart, fiercely independent teenager, doctors waged a blitzkrieg on Martin's body. Six surgeries. Two experimental treatments. Thousands of doctor visits. The cancer never went into remission, but Martin and his doctors managed to keep it in check by staying vigilant, always catching the disease just as it was on the brink of spreading.

 

Still, the cancer took its toll. Martin was riddled with the effects of anxiety and depression. He had become so focused on saving his body from the cancer that he hadn't made time for the people and things in his life that really mattered. His relationships were in shambles; he and his daughter barely spoke.

 

So in 2010, after reading an article in a magazine about a medical trial that involved giving people with cancer and anxiety the drug psilocybin — the active ingredient in the psychedelic drug magic mushrooms — he contacted the people running the experiment and asked to be enrolled.

...

In the homey facility at Johns Hopkins, Martin received a pill, which he swallowed with a glass of water. For study purposes, he couldn't know whether it was a placebo or psilocybin, the drug the researchers aimed to study.

...

As his trip slowly began to draw to a close and he began to return to reality, Martin recalls a moment when the two worlds — the one in which he was hallucinating and the reality he could call up from memory — seemed to merge. He turned his attention to his relationships. He thought of his daughter, his friends, his coworkers.

 

"In my relationships, I had always approached it from a 'How do I manage this?' How do I present myself?' 'Am I a good listener?' type of standpoint," Martin said. "But it dawned on me as I was coming out of [the trip] that relationships are pretty much spontaneous if you're just present and connecting."

That shift, which Martin said has deepened since he took the psilocybin in 2010, has had enduring implications for his relationships.

"Now if I'm meeting people, the default is to be just present — not just physically, but mentally present to the conversation," he said. "That switch has been profound."

 

While he felt himself undergo a shift during his trip on psilocybin, Martin says the most enduring changes in his personality and his approach to interacting with those around him unfolded long after he took the drug. For him, the drug was merely a catalyst — a "kick-start," he likes to call it. By redirecting his perspective for a few hours, the psilocybin unleashed a chain reaction in the way he sees and approaches the world.

 

The trip "kind of opened up a more intuitive brain processing that I wasn’t fully aware was there," said Martin.

 

http://www.sfgate.co...-a-10904542.php

 


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#35 Sidestreet

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 05:11 AM

"Australia's Biggest Drug Busts"

 

By AAP

For 9News.Com.Au

2/6/17

 

 

SOME OF THE BIGGEST DRUG BUSTS IN AUSTRALIAN HISTORY:

 

1997

 

Ten tonnes of cannabis resin, worth an estimated $77 million at the time, seized from a fishing vessel at Port Stephens, north of Newcastle.

 

2001

 

Five men - three Colombians and two US citizens - arrested after authorities seized 1.17 tonnes of cocaine on a secluded beach at Dulverton Bay about 700km north of Perth.

 

A 17-year-old American teenager arrested after police and customs officers discovered 90kg of cocaine hidden in a dinghy tied to the back of a 17-metre yacht in Brisbane's Moreton Bay.

 

2004

 

100kg of cocaine worth $45 million imported from South America on the grain carrier Marcos Dias seized in Western Australia's southern port city of Albany.

 

2005

 

About five million MDMA tablets, weighing more than one tonne in total and with a street value of $250 million at the time seized at a Melbourne factory.

 

2007

 

4.4-tonne haul of 15,000 ecstasy tablets hidden inside tomato tins in a shipping container from Italy at the Melbourne docks, with an estimated street value of $440 million.

 

2014

 

2.8 tonnes of MDMA and ice, worth more than $1.5 billion, discovered by authorities hidden among furniture in a container at the German port of Hamburg, with the shipment going on to arrive in Australia with the consignment delivered to an address in western Sydney.

 

2016

 

More than 1.2 tonnes of crystal MDMA - the equivalent to more than 4.1 million ecstasy tablets - seized in Sydney in October. Two Polish men, 28 and 29, imported the drugs concealed in a cargo of aluminium rollers from the Czech Republic. The MDMA crystals, worth an estimated $145 million on the street, were seized at a storage facility in Hornsby during a joint AFP and Australian Border Force raid.

Detectives pounce on a handful of accused smugglers on Christmas night seizing about 500kg of cocaine from a boat as it pulled up to a ramp on the NSW Central Coast. The group allegedly tried to import another 600kg of cocaine but that shipment was intercepted off the coast of Tahiti in March.

 

2017

 

A record 1.4 tonnes of cocaine worth more than $312 million from a yacht off the NSW south coast with six people being charged following raids following the culmination of a two-and-a-half-year investigation.

http://www.9news.com...gest-drug-busts

 

 

Wish I could read about all the ones that made it through!


Edited by Sidestreet, 06 February 2017 - 05:13 AM.


#36 Sidestreet

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 05:18 AM

"Florida heroin bust reveals something bizarre: Drugs covered in Donald Trump’s face"

By Peter Holley

For The Washington Post

2/4/17

 

 

Heroin, like cocaine and marijuana, seems to inspire an endless supply of monikers once the drug hits the streets.

 

In case you needed a refresher, there’s “dope,” “smack,” “China white,” “brown sugar,” “Mexican mud,” “black tar,” “horse,” “snowball,” and “Big H,” just to name a few.

Florida law enforcement officials announced this week that there’s a new name for the deadly drug: “Donald Trump.”

 

After a six-month investigation into local drug dealing, the Hernando County Sheriff’s Office last month confiscated 5,500 heroin packages, some of which included an image of the president’s face and name, according to NBC affiliate WFLA.

 

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, addressing the media at the Hernando County Emergency Operations Center on Friday, was not amused, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

“All I want to say to this drug dealer is, ‘Big mistake by putting the president’s picture on this,’ ” said Bondi. “Big mistake. Because he is going to be our most fierce advocate in taking this junk off of our streets. Can you believe this? Big mistake.”

 

She added: “I’m going to make sure [Trump] gets one of these packages when the case is all over to put in the Oval Office to remind him of all the good he’s doing.”

 

Bondi found herself at the center of a controversy during the presidential campaign last year, when it emerged that Trump had failed to disclose an improper $25,000 contribution to a political group connected to the Florida Republican, who was at the time considering whether to open a fraud investigation against Trump University.

 

The donation, made in 2013 by the Donald J. Trump Foundation, violated federal rules that prohibit charities from donating to political candidates, The Washington Post reported in September. Trump and his team also failed to disclose the gift to the Internal Revenue Service, instead reporting that the donation was given to an unrelated group with a similar name — effectively obscuring the contribution.

Trump brushed off questions about the donation in September, saying: “I’ve just known Pam Bondi for years. I have a lot of respect for her. Never spoke to her about that at all. And just have a lot of respect for her as a person. And she has done an amazing job as the attorney general of Florida. She is very popular.”

https://www.washingt...ld-trumps-face/


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#37 Alder Logs

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 07:01 AM

Trump's bravado in his shuck-and-jive responses would make me think the more that his conspicuous narcissistic personality disorder is revealing that it extends well into the level of psychopathy.    When anything like that blatant conflict would make most people crack, he just doubles down the lies and pushes through.  He's found his niche. 


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#38 Sidestreet

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 05:21 AM

Oregon’s Bill to Protect Cannabis-Consuming Employees

By Allie Beckett

For Marijuana.com

2/7/17

 

 

A recently filed bill, SB 301, aims to protect both medical and recreational consumers of cannabis from employer discrimination. The bill would make it unlawful for employers to fire or not hire individuals who use any state-legal substance during nonworking hours.

 

Portland attorney, Beth Creighton, argues that “The voters in the state of Oregon have decided that marijuana is legal, so you shouldn’t be fired for something that’s legal.” It’s only common sense, right? Washington State, which has been a recreational state for two years longer than Oregon, just filed a similar bill that would protect medical marijuana consumers only. It’s unfair to citizens of legal states to risk losing their jobs to partake in a substance that is legal within their state’s borders.  

 

Tobacco users currently have employment protections stipulating that as long as consumption doesn’t interfere with work duties, it is illegal to fire an individual for smoking cigarettes. “Senate Bill 301 takes the same protections tobacco smokers have and extends them to marijuana users,” says Attorney Leland Berger, Chair of the Portland NORML Legislative Committee. In an interview with KPTV, Berger said this bill isn’t only about unfair employment practices, but also a stigma he hopes to end.

http://www.marijuana...ming-employees/

 

Bills like this are the next logical step in the cannabis movement, after legalization.  You shouldn't be arrested for it, and you shouldn't be fired for it either.


Edited by Sidestreet, 08 February 2017 - 05:21 AM.

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#39 TVCasualty

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 01:16 PM

"Florida heroin bust reveals something bizarre: Drugs covered in Donald Trump’s face"

By Peter Holley

For The Washington Post

2/4/17

 

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, addressing the media at the Hernando County Emergency Operations Center on Friday, was not amused, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

“All I want to say to this drug dealer is, ‘Big mistake by putting the president’s picture on this,’ ” said Bondi. “Big mistake. Because he is going to be our most fierce advocate in taking this junk off of our streets. Can you believe this? Big mistake.”

https://www.washingt...ld-trumps-face/

 

 

That's a strange comment, to say the least. I guess the takeaway from it is that aspiring heroin dealers should put Obama's or Pelosi's picture on their bags as then folks like the Florida AG would not pursue them as aggressively. Or something.



#40 Sidestreet

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 06:51 AM

"LSD to Cure Depression? Not So Fast"

 

By Richard A. Friedman

For the New York Times (editorial)

2/13/17

 

 

Psychedelics, the fabled enlightenment drugs of the ’60s, are making a comeback — this time as medical treatment.

 

A recent study claimed that psilocybin, a mushroom-derived hallucinogenic, relieves anxiety and depression in people with life-threatening cancer. Anecdotal reports have said similar things about so-called microdoses of LSD.

 

The allure is understandable, given the limits of our treatments for depression and anxiety. About a third of patients with major depression don’t get better, even after several trials of different antidepressants. But I fear that in our desire to combat suffering, we will ignore the potential risks of these drugs, or be seduced by preliminary research that seems promising.

This appears to be the case with the new psilocybin study, which has some serious design flaws that cast doubt on the results (and which the authors mention briefly). The study, done at New York University School of Medicine, examined a very small number of people with cancer in a “crossover” design in which each subject served as her own control, sequentially receiving doses of psilocybin and the control drug niacin, in random order. (Another recent study of psilocybin, done at Johns Hopkins University, used a similar crossover design.)

...

The fad of LSD microdosing — typified by Ayelet Waldman’s new memoir, “A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage and My Life” — is far more worrisome. LSD is an unregulated and superpotent drug; users cannot be sure what or how much they are actually taking.

...

The bottom line is that we don’t know how safe or effective psychedelics are because most of the data have been anecdotal or from small trials. Part of the reason is that hallucinogens have been classified as Schedule I drugs, the most restrictive category, reserved for drugs considered to have no legitimate medical use and to have a high abuse potential. This makes it somewhat difficult for researchers to conduct large studies, but it is by no means an absolute bar; there are many trials of Schedule I drugs like THC and cannabinol, active molecules in marijuana.

 

I am anxious that we do not repeat the mistake that we made with cocaine. Aside from Freud’s glowing 1884 monograph on cocaine, “Über Coca,” in which he described his research on cocaine — and his addiction to it — there was little modern research on the drug. In the ’70s and ’80s, people assumed that the absence of data that cocaine was addictive meant that it was safe and dismissed concerns as hysterical moralizing. An epidemic followed.

 

Psychedelic drugs don’t come close to the toxicity or abuse potential of cocaine. But we can’t assume they are perfectly safe just because we don’t yet have serious evidence of harm.

Psychedelics might turn out to have real promise, but that needs to be proven through large, rigorous, placebo-controlled trials. We’re not there yet.

...

Richard A. Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry and the director of the psychopharmacology clinic at the Weill Cornell Medical College

https://www.nytimes....ot-so-fast.html

 

This assessment is annoying, but look at that last part: it basically calls for the next step in the research--a step forward.


Edited by Sidestreet, 13 February 2017 - 06:52 AM.

  • ChimX and riseabovethought like this




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