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The Heady Times - A Psychoactive News Stream


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#41 Alder Logs

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 09:55 AM

Why is selling placebos at Dead concerts such a thankless job?


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#42 Sidestreet

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 05:26 AM

lol it sounds like there's a punchline coming



#43 Sidestreet

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 05:33 AM

"Marriage Is Driving Some to Drugs And It May Not Be a Bad Thing"

 

By Don Lattin

For California Magazine

2/13/17

 

 

One longtime underground psychedelic therapist, who for obvious reasons asked to remain anonymous, told me she has safely and effectively used MDMA with dozens of couples. In an interview in her cozy San Francisco office, she explained how the drug can make her clients less defensive and less likely to project past traumas onto their partners.

 

“It’s not always sweet and schmoozy,” she said. “They often have difficult issues and come to me to look at the dynamics of their relationship. Who has the power? Who wants sex more than the other? Should they separate? It’s not always pretty, but it’s alive. Seeing the other partner express fears can create more honesty in the relationship, and more intimacy.”

 

Her protocol begins by seeing each partner separately and leading them on an individual MDMA journey, which can last three to four hours. Sometime later, the couple comes together for a joint session in which they are given time to both inwardly reflect on and then talk about whatever issues they want to address. The therapist then gives them time to be alone.

 

There’s a queen-size futon with sheets, blankets and pillows. “It’s okay if they get naked,” she said. “They can be physical—bodies, skin—without being sexual. After 20 or 25 minutes I’ll knock on the door and ask to come in. This is often the time when we might talk about their love language or their sex life.”

 

While they are still feeling the effects of the MDMA, this therapist begins the important discussion about how they are going to integrate the drug experience in their daily lives. “How are they going to follow up on these insights? They make decisions right there,” she said.

 

The actual MDMA journeys take place in a woodsy location outside the city. Some couples go for a walk in a nearly forest toward the end of their trip, or even spend the night at a cottage on the property.

https://alumni.berke...ot-be-bad-thing


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#44 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 06:05 PM

"LSD to Cure Depression? Not So Fast"
 
By Richard A. Friedman
For the New York Times (editorial)
2/13/17


https://www.nytimes....ot-so-fast.html
 
This assessment is annoying, but look at that last part: it basically calls for the next step in the research--a step forward.

 

 

You're too kind. But it was interesting to note that he didn't actually make any claims that it was dangerous, though he does need to catch up on the literature.

 

 

And I thought part of the fun of LSD was not knowing exactly how much you were taking? :meditate:


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#45 dead_diver

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 09:29 PM


"An object lesson in what not to do when you find a big bale of cocaine in the ocean"


Sentencing Law and Policy
1/28/17

http://sentencing.ty...-the-ocean.html


He got lucky. Luck is relative, of course.

The father of an acquaintance of mine used to run weed from Texas to Florida in the 80's in his sailboat, and his partner was hanging out at home on his porch late one evening when his house was almost hit by a Cessna (not really, but it apparently was low enough to make him instinctively duck as it passed!). His house was a mile or so inland from the coast and there was no one else around as the northern Gulf coast hadn't been developed much yet (so was a good place to be low-profile with a house hidden in the swampy wetlands).

The plane was being chased by the Coast Guard, and as it flew over his house he saw things falling from it. He investigated and eventually recovered 5 bundles of coke that were about 50 pounds each. He stashed them in a detached garage next to his house and called my acquaintance, who took one bundle off his hands that same night to sell for some quick cash (and a LOT at that, so why wait?).

When my acquaintance returned two days later for more bundles (since the buyers were quite eager to buy them all at the below-market rate he was selling them for) his friend's wife was not very pleased to see him (to put it mildly) and informed him that a few hours after he'd left with the first bundle, she went out to the garage to check on her husband since he hadn't come to bed and found him dead and the bundles gone. When the cops showed up and ruled it a homicide (since his throat had been slit they figured it probably wasn't suicide) they damned well knew what had happened since they were fully aware of the chase that had occurred right over the property.

The most disturbing part of the story is that due to peculiar details surrounding these events, it was in all likelihood the agents who'd been chasing the smugglers that "recovered" the haul since none of it ever ended up on the news.

The moral of these stories is that people don't simply forget about million-dollar shipments of cocaine when forced to dump 'em, and you don't want whoever shows up (and someone will, probably within hours) to find any of it stashed in your garage, or car, or boat, or pocket. And if he hadn't stored it in a detached garage located some distance from the house then his wife would've likely been killed as well.

So if you ever find bundles of coke somewhere out of place, run like hell and don't look back.

Back in the 80's there was a news story in Florida that a ranchers cow was killed with a duffle bag of coke that fell out of the sky. I doubt the smugglers tried to retrieve that one. It's probably lucky for the rancher it killed his cow and made the news.

I dont know anyone that ever found any coke but when I was in highschool a friend found a bale of pot floating in the Hillsborough river near a canoe rental. They used to call it square grouper back then. Sea weed. Save the bales! Pot soaked in saltwater is kind of funky to put it mildly. Smelled like dried cowshit with a hint of ammonia but still got you good and stoned. At first he just dried it out and we smoked it. Salty tasting weed yum. He later figured out that it could be rinsed in tap water to get most of the salt and dead plankton funk out of it and still keep the THC. It was still pretty bad but was free and got us stoned so nobody complained. There was probably about 10 lbs that was salvageable. I remember him trying to dry it out on his bedroom floor lol. Decent pot was pretty inexpensive back then which made this stuff unsellable. He would give it away by the handfulls. I remember gluing rolling papers together and rolling huge joints on a regular basis just fucking because. Me and my group of stoner friends smoked that stuff for an entire summer. It's a miracle we all didn't get horrible lung infections of some kind. Ah, the good old days.
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#46 Sidestreet

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 08:10 AM

"Drug raid nets LSD, shrooms and cash"

 

By Unknown

For multiple local news sources (about 4 sources re-print the story verbatim)

2/18/17

 

 

KALAMAZOO (WKZO AM/FM) -- Acting on citizen tips, Public Safety has raided a suspected drug house in the 4100 block of Hawthorne Ridge Friday.

Officers from the Community Policing Unit and KVET executed a search warrant and seized marijuana, marijuana wax, Psilocybin mushrooms, suspected LSD and several other items used in the production and distribution of illicit drugs.

 

They also seized over $1,200 in cash, believed to be the proceeds of illegal drug sales.

...

No arrests were made, but charges will be requested from the Prosecutor’s Office.

 

post-102525-0-84599300-1487509849.jpg

http://wkzo.com/news...rooms-and-cash/

 

 

Looks pretty small-time.  Probably had people in and out of the house.

Attached Thumbnails

  • news story.jpg

Edited by Sidestreet, 19 February 2017 - 08:13 AM.


#47 CatsAndBats

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 08:35 AM

"Drug raid nets LSD, shrooms and cash"

 

By Unknown

For multiple local news sources (about 4 sources re-print the story verbatim)

2/18/17

 

 

KALAMAZOO (WKZO AM/FM) -- Acting on citizen tips, Public Safety has raided a suspected drug house in the 4100 block of Hawthorne Ridge Friday.

Officers from the Community Policing Unit and KVET executed a search warrant and seized marijuana, marijuana wax, Psilocybin mushrooms, suspected LSD and several other items used in the production and distribution of illicit drugs.

 

They also seized over $1,200 in cash, believed to be the proceeds of illegal drug sales.

...

No arrests were made, but charges will be requested from the Prosecutor’s Office.

 

post-102525-0-84599300-1487509849.jpg

http://wkzo.com/news...rooms-and-cash/

 

 

Looks pretty small-time.  Probably had people in and out of the house.

 

 

I had more than that in my locker in high school, in Texas no less.


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#48 Sidestreet

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 07:36 AM

"Spicer: Expect to see 'greater enforcement' of federal marijuana law"

 

By Madeline Conway

For Politico

2/23/17

 

 

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Thursday that he expects states to see “greater enforcement” of the federal law against marijuana use, a move that would be at odds with a growing number of states’ decisions to legalize it.

 

Spicer, taking questions from reporters at the daily briefing, differentiated between the administration’s positions on medical marijuana and recreational marijuana.

 

President Donald Trump “understands the pain and suffering that many people go through who are facing especially terminal diseases, and the comfort that some of these drugs, including medical marijuana, can bring to them,” he said, also noting previous action by Congress not to fund the Justice Department “go[ing] after those folks.”

As for “recreational marijuana, that’s a very, very different subject,” Spicer said.

http://www.politico....n-spicer-235318

 

 

 

"Washington state vows to fight any cannabis crackdown by feds"

For Marijuana Business Daily

2/24/17

 

 

 

Washington state is ready to fight if necessary to keep its legal marijuana, Attorney General Bob Ferguson said after White House spokesman Sean Spicer hinted at a federal crackdown.

“We will resist any efforts to thwart the will of the voters in Washington,” Ferguson said, according to the Associated Press.

 

Spicer offered no details about what any renewed federal efforts in legal-cannabis states might entail but said he expected “greater enforcement” and drew a distinction between marijuana use for medical and recreational purposes.

 

Ferguson said he was disappointed in Spicer’s comments, noting that he and Gov. Jay Inslee previously prepared to defend the state’s cannabis program against any efforts by the administration of President Barack Obama to shut it down. Obama ultimately agreed to tolerate tightly regulated marijuana markets in states adopted them.

http://mjbizdaily.co...ackdown-by-feds



#49 Sidestreet

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 07:47 AM

"Governor Terry McAuliffe Legalizes Syringe Access Programs in Virginia"

 

By SATprnews

2/25/17

 

 

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe signed legislation this week that legalizes syringe access programs in the state. Virginia has been experiencing significant increases in opioid overdose, opioid misuse, injection drug use, and rates of HIV and hepatitis C infection. These concerning trends led Virginia’s health commissioner Dr. Marissa Levine and Governor Terry McAuliffe to declare the state’s opioid addiction crisis a public health emergency late last year.

 

Increasing access to sterile syringes is essential to reducing rates of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C transmission,” said Kaitlyn Boecker, Policy Coordinator for the Drug Policy Alliance. “Establishing syringe access programs will save thousands of lives in Virginia by preventing the spread of HIV and other preventable diseases.”

Here are some quick facts about Virginia’s new law and syringe access programs:

  • The legislation (HB 2317) authored by Delegate John M. O’Bannon III (R – House District 73) authorizes the Commissioner of Health to establish and operate syringe programs during a declared public health emergency. The objectives of these programs are to reduce the spread of HIV, viral hepatitis, and other blood-borne diseases in Virginia, including through the accidental transmission of needle stick injuries to law enforcement and other first responders, and to provide information to individuals who inject drugs regarding addiction treatment services. These programs will be located in at-risk communities, in accordance with criteria established by the Department of Health. The legislation takes effect on July 1st.

 

  • Syringe access programs have a proven, decades-long track record of preventing the spread of infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C, in addition to reducing problematic drug use by connecting people who inject drugs with testing, health care and treatment.

 

  • Many jurisdictions adjacent to Virginia already have successful syringe services programs, including North Carolina, West Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

 

  • With the new law, Virginia will join a growing number of states that recently passed syringe access reforms, including Florida, Indiana, Kentucky, and Maryland. Due to recent Congressional action to modify the decades-long ban on federal funding for syringe access programs, these newly expanded programs will be able to seek federal support for their work.

 

  • By implementing syringe programs now, Virginia may be able to avoid public health crises like the 2015 HIV outbreak in Scott County, Indiana, in which a lack of access to harm reduction resources like syringe  access contributed to over 200 new cases of HIV (whereas Scott County typically only saw 5 HIV cases per year).

 

  • An analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that eight Virginia counties (Buchanan, Dickenson, Russell, Lee, Wise, Tazewell, Patrick and Wythe) are at risk of an outbreak similar to Scott County, Indiana.

 

  • Virginia already has seen a spike in hepatitis C cases: in 2014, more than 6,600 cases were reported to the Virginia Department of Health and in 2015 more than 8,000 cases were reported. This significant rise in blood borne pathogens could signal a spike in HIV on the horizon as well.

 

“Thanks to the dedication of Virginia’s Health Commissioner, Governor McAuliffe and the sponsor of the syringe measure, Del. John O’Bannon, Virginia has taken a huge step toward preventing further harms from the opioid and heroin crisis,” added Boecker. “We hope this is just the beginning of broader efforts in Virginia to reduce preventable harms caused by outdated drug laws and drug misuse.”

http://www.satprnews...ms-in-virginia/


Edited by Sidestreet, 26 February 2017 - 07:48 AM.


#50 Sidestreet

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 05:59 AM

"New batch of highly toxic pink party capsules linked to drug overdoses are being sold as MDMA in Melbourne"

By Cameron Phelps

For Daily Mail Australia

2/25/17

 

 

A pink capsule linked to drug overdoses in Melbourne last month could be back on the garden cities streets this weekend, according to authorities.

The extremely dangerous drug which is sold as MDMA was responsible for killing three and hospitaling 17 more in January.

The highly toxic party drug which comes in pink-and-clear capsules containing brown granules led to a young woman in the ACT being rushed to hospital suffering seizures, the ABC reported.

...

Drug expert Dr David Caldicott, from ACT Health, warned that the drug containing fluoroamphetamine (or 4FA) and 25CNBOMe which is a psychoactive chemical and hallucogenic should not be consumed.

'It is very important that people who are in possession of this product dispose of it safely and do not consume it,' he told the ABC.

Dr Caldicott also warned that even in very small amounts the drugs would be at the very end of a scale of substances that are extremely dangerous.

...

'25CNBOMe is a drug that not only causes hallucinations [from] which people have died ... because they are scared and jump off buildings, it is directly toxic,' Dr Caldicott told The Age.

'It can cause seizures, severe cardiovascular problems, arrhythmias in the heart and also seizures. Patients have been hurt and killed from both behavioural effects while hallucinating, as well as the toxicological effects on the circulation.'

http://www.dailymail...-sold-MDMA.html

 

3DA2C01800000578-0-image-a-16_1487997655085.jpg

 

 

I was suspicious about the assertion that someone had jumped off of a building on this stuff (I've heard it referred to as "N-Bomb" before) so I searched and did find one Aussie story about a teen who did just that: http://www.smh.com.a...0606-2nrpe.html.

 

We don't usually discuss "research chemicals" like that here, but in the name of harm reduction, suffice it to say that 25C-NBome is in circulation in America too, it is sometimes sold as LSD, and it does kill people.

 

Erowid:  https://erowid.org/c...ome_death.shtml

 

I've heard that you can tell the difference because (a) N-Bomb is very bitter tasting and (b) inactive if swallowed.  Can anyone corroborate?


Edited by Sidestreet, 27 February 2017 - 06:06 AM.


#51 Sidestreet

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 06:10 AM

"What We Can Learn From Portugal’s Drug Policy"

 

By Kaila B. Preston and Abigail R. Hall-Blanco

For Inside Sources

2/28/17

 

 

For more than 100 years the United States has looked to prohibition to curtail the use of drugs. Proponents argue that by making substances like marijuana, cocaine and heroin illegal, government can significantly reduce drug-related crime, prevent addiction and stop the spread of drug-related disease.

 

The results have been less than impressive. In fact, Michael Botticelli, the director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, said the War on Drugs has consisted of “failed policies and failed practices.”

Among alternative policies proposed to better achieve the stated goals are decriminalization of drugs — relaxed enforcement and penalties for drug offenses — and outright legalization of all drugs.

Yes, all of them.

 

These options may sound counterproductive, but the data tell a different story. In 2001 Portugal shocked the world and voted to decriminalize all drugs in response to a growing heroin problem.

Things like drug trafficking remain illegal, but drug users are viewed as ill rather than criminal. Instead of immediate arrest and incarceration, people caught with less than a 10-day supply of hard drugs are taken before a special court of legal experts, psychologists and social workers. The goal is a health-focused solution to drug use, with an occasional small fine or community service.

Fifteen years later plentiful data tell a drastically different story from what many predicted. Drug use among 15- to 24-year-olds has decreased dramatically and drug-induced deaths dropped from 80 in 2001 to 16 in 2012. Before 2001 Portugal confined around 100,000 drug users. Within the first 10 years of the policy’s adoption, this number halved. Today Portugal boasts one of the lowest drug-usage rates in all of Europe.

 

People are leaving the drug market and seeking treatment. The number of individuals registered in rehab has risen from 6,000 in 1999 to more than 24,000 in 2008. The number of heroin users who inject the drug has decreased from 45 percent to 17 percent. Injection rates are particularly important when discussing drug-related disease. Drug addicts now account for only 20 percent of HIV cases in the country, a significant improvement from the previous 56 percent.

 

These results can be explained with basic economics. As people get help for their drug use, the number of users — that is, the demand for drugs — falls. When the demand falls, drug suppliers find that their once-lucrative enterprise no longer bears fruit. So they exit the market.

 

This would explain why a 2010 study in the British Journal of Criminology found that after decriminalization Portugal saw a significant reduction in the imprisonment of alleged drug dealers, from 14,000 in 2000 to 5,000 in 2010. In fact, the proportion of people in jail for crimes committed while under the influence of drugs or to feed a drug habit fell from 41 percent in 1999 to 21 percent in 2008.

By redirecting resources previously allocated to arresting and jailing drug users, Portugal has not only curbed its drug problem but has created a healthier society. When asked what the global community should take away from Portugal’s policy, Alex Steven, president of the International Society of the Study of Drug Policy, said, “The main lesson to learn (is that) decriminalizing drugs doesn’t necessarily lead to disaster, and it does free up resources for more effective responses to drug-related problems.”

 

There is something to learn from treating drug use as a physical and mental illness. Consider the results of the Portuguese policy versus the U.S. approach. While Portugal’s rates of use, incarceration and illness have all fallen, drug use in the United States has remained relatively unchanged for the past decade. Each year 1.5 million people are arrested on drug-related charges, 80 percent for mere possession. Half of all federal incarcerations are drug-related.

 

Few would argue that drug use isn’t a problem. Without a doubt, drug use presents problems for public health and destroys many lives. But when examining the efficacy of drug policies, the U.S. model is nothing short of a complete failure. It’s time to look at alternatives. As the Portuguese case illustrates, so-called “radical” policies may be perfectly reasonable.

For more than 100 years the United States has looked to prohibition to curtail the use of drugs. Proponents argue that by making substances like marijuana, cocaine and heroin illegal, government can significantly reduce drug-related crime, prevent addiction and stop the spread of drug-related disease.

http://www.insidesou...al-drug-policy/


Edited by Sidestreet, 01 March 2017 - 06:13 AM.

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#52 Sidestreet

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 06:17 AM

"Eliminating the Office of National Drug Control Policy during epidemic is wrong move"

 

By Christopher Poulos

For The Hill

2/28/17

 

 

2,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2015, yet the White House budget office just placed the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) on a list of federal agencies and programs to be potentially axed. Drug overdoses now kill more people in the United States than guns or car accidents and are the leading cause of unintentional death in the United States. Eliminating ONDCP would exacerbate the opioid epidemic causing even more preventable deaths. As a person in long-term recovery serving as the executive director of an addiction treatment center on a college campus, this issue is close to my heart.  

 
The mission of ONDCP is to reduce drug use and its consequences by promoting prevention, treatment, and recovery, and by reducing the supply of drugs. President Obama appointed Michael Botticelli to lead the office as “drug czar” but we referred to him as the “recovery czar,” because he was open about his own recovery and helped shift the office’s policies toward treating addiction as a health condition rather than a moral failing.
 
I had the honor of serving as an intern at ONDCP during my final year of law school and saw first hand the impact the office had on promoting recovery and reducing the discrimination and stigma surrounding addiction. We encouraged federal agencies, contractors, and non-governmental organizations to utilize accurate language and not define people by their addiction. The office had “got naloxone?” bumper stickers posted, encouraging access to naloxone, which is a harmless drug that saves lives by reversing opioid overdoses. We helped positively shift public perception, thereby increasing compassion, decreasing stigma, and encouraging people to seek treatment. 
 
The office took a “smart on crime” approach to drug policy, acknowledging that the traditional War on Drugs approach has proven wildly ineffective. Each year, ONDCP distributes millions of dollars in federal grant money to areas hit hardest by drugs. In August 2015, ONDCP announced $13.4 million in funding for High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas. This money was used both for supply reduction and prevention. 13.4 million dollars is a drop in the bucket for the federal government, but often means the difference between life and death for the people in the communities receiving these funds. 
 
As the tip of the spear for national drug control policy, ONDCP develops and implements national drug control strategy and coordinates collaboration between law enforcement and public health entities within and beyond the federal government. No other federal agency has this essential mandate. ONDCP facilitates cooperation between local, state, and federal entities that without ONDCP involvement would be seriously hampered or nonexistent. As a White House component, ONDCP’s voice and policies carry weight in ways that non Executive Office of the President entities do not. ONDCP also develops the federal drug control budget, overseeing and approving the drug policy related components of a wide range of federal agencies’ budgets, from the Department of Defense and the Drug Enforcement Agency to HHS and HUD. 
 
Under directors Botticelli and Gil Kerlikowski, strong emphasis was placed on addressing the opioid epidemic by helping people achieve and sustain long-term recovery. For the first time in the office’s history, President Obama’s 2017 drug control budget funded demand reduction efforts at a similar level as supply reduction efforts. Supply reduction had always been more heavily funded. This demonstrated acceptance that the country cannot arrest its way out of a drug epidemic and that a fundamental reallocation of resources was warranted.
 
The cost of continuing to operate ONDCP pales in comparison to the cost of addiction on our society, which stands at hundreds of billions of dollars per year. At a time when our nation is losing hundreds of people per day to a drug epidemic, eliminating ONDCP is unconscionable. 
 
If the administration’s goal is to save money by trimming fat, the office addressing the nation’s drug epidemic is the wrong place to do so. People suffering from addiction and people in recovery are not bad people. We have a treatable health condition and we are worth saving. We do recover.
 
Christopher Poulos is the executive director of Life of Purpose Treatment at the University of North Texas. He has served at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and The Sentencing Project. Poulos has advised United States Senator Angus King (I-Maine) on addiction and justice policy and has served on several task forces related to criminal justice policy. He is a graduate of the University of Maine School of Law, where he was president of the American Constitution Society and represented children facing criminal charges as a student attorney in the Juvenile Justice Clinic. Views are his own and do not represent any organization he is or has been affiliated with.

http://thehill.com/b...l-policy-during



#53 Sidestreet

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 05:44 AM

It begins...  I really get the sense that they aren't going after medical users, but the feds are not going to defer to state laws regarding any non-medical use.  This party was going to take place on tribal land, where it is still illegal but where the Obama administration had relaxed its enforcement:

 

"US snuffs pot fans' plans to party on tribal land near Vegas"

 

By Ken Ritter

For ABCNews

3/3/17

 

 

A federal prosecutor has snuffed out plans by pot fans to celebrate Nevada's new recreational marijuana law by lighting up on an American Indian reservation near Las Vegas.

 

U.S. Attorney Daniel Bogden took a hard line in a letter to organizers of a weekend cannabis festival, saying federal law applies and pot smokers could be prosecuted.

 

Bogden wouldn't comment Friday beyond referring to the Feb. 16 letter he sent to the Moapa Band of Paiutes.

 

The warning from the top federal prosecutor in Nevada came while several U.S. senators are airing concerns about the possibility of a Trump administration crackdown on marijuana use in states that have legalized pot for recreational or medicinal purposes.

 

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada joined nine other Democrats and one Republican, Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, in signing a Thursday letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

 

U.S. Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., sent a similar letter to Sessions on Wednesday.

 

Organizers of the High Times Cannabis Cup festival said there will still be music, T-shirts and souvenirs at the event at a Moapa Band of Paiutes festival site.

 

But spokesman Joe Brezny said it will essentially be just a concert this year.

 

"We've removed the marijuana," he said. "There will be no smoking area, no edibles competition, no cannabis topicals or lotions."

 

Brezny said more than 10,000 tickets were sold this week for the two-day event Saturday and Sunday at a site about 35 miles north of the Las Vegas Strip. The concert is headlined by hip-hop artist Ludacris.

 

Robert Capecchi, federal policies chief at the Marijuana Policy Project advocacy group in Washington, D.C., said a lot of attendees might be disappointed or upset that they can't smoke on site.

 

But he noted that laws are different in federal areas within the eight states that have legalized recreational marijuana and the 28 states and the District of Columbia where medical marijuana is legal.

 

"There's a different balance between the federal government and Indian tribes and the federal government and the states," Capecchi said.

 

Nevada is still getting its enforcement footing after recreational marijuana became legal Jan. 1. Voters approved allowing adults to possess and use up to an ounce of pot, but consumption isn't allowed in casinos or public places.

 

Bogden said a 2013 Obama administration directive that was seen as relaxing enforcement on tribal lands in states where pot is legal might have been misinterpreted.

 

Pot is still illegal in Indian Country and on federal land, he said.

http://abcnews.go.co...n-land-45895216


Edited by Sidestreet, 06 March 2017 - 05:45 AM.


#54 Heirloom

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 04:26 PM

A vaccine to prevent drug use /abuse .

https://www.deepdyve...umin-MHLbkn6m2A

I think we are all glad we were not vaccinated to create antibodies that could prevent us from experiencing nature, whether opiate , cannabis , mushrooms ..ect.

#55 Alder Logs

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Posted 09 March 2017 - 04:28 PM

Is there a vaccine yet for vaccination caused maladies? 



#56 Sidestreet

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:48 AM

"Marijuana v. opioid addiction: an easy choice"

[Written by a former federal prosecutor]

 

By Bill Nettles

For The State [S.C. Newspaper]

3/12/17

 

 

Columbia, SC

 

Many patients who would benefit from medical marijuana have no viable treatment for their pain and suffering other than highly addictive, cost-prohibitive pharmaceuticals such as opioids. Treating chronic pain and illness with opioids often results in a devastating, family-wrecking, life-ending addiction.

 

This is a tragedy playing out daily across our state, and it is one that can be, and should be, avoided.

For six and a half years I served as the chief federal law enforcement officer for South Carolina. I have seen firsthand the devastating effect the opioid epidemic has had on our citizens, and I can report that we will never incarcerate our way out of this public health crisis.

 

The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of medical marijuana for the treatment of a wide array of illnesses has been recognized and endorsed by the National Academy of Sciences. And The American Journal of Public Health has found that opioid use and deaths associated with opioid abuse dropped dramatically in states that legalized access to medical marijuana. Because of the opioid epidemic facing our country, it is important to note that medical marijuana has a history of zero fatalities due to overdose.

 

Until Feb. 23, the only legitimate issue of concern to S.C. legislators in deciding whether to pass a medical marijuana bill was the lingering uncertainty regarding the Trump administration’s position on medical marijuana. That’s when President Donald Trump’s press secretary Sean Spicer said the president sees “a big difference between use of marijuana for medical purposes and for recreational purposes.” The administration indicated that, while it plans to increase enforcement of laws prohibiting recreational use of marijuana, it will allow states to legalize medical marijuana without federal government interference.

 

The bills pending in the Legislature would make medical marijuana available to patients facing specific diagnoses, and access to this medication would be limited by law to patients who have a prescription from a licensed physician.

 

The Academy of Sciences has documented something that patients have known for a long time: Medical marijuana helps ease the suffering and pain of those with illnesses, and it does so without the highly addictive pitfalls of opioids. Now we have learned that the last rational objection to legalizing medical marijuana has been cleared.

 

Soldiers who have served our country and returned with post-traumatic stress disorder and adults and children who, through no fault of their own, are suffering with pain and illness deserve the right to treatment prescribed by their physician that is a non-addictive, cost-effective medicine.

 

With the Trump administration’s endorsement of medical marijuana, only irrational fear with no data or facts to back it up stands between patients and the treatment they need in South Carolina.

It is time for democracy to work. The State reported in October that 78 percent of South Carolinians supported medical marijuana. That means 78 percent of South Carolinians — Republicans, independents and Democrats — believe that unfounded fears should not stand in the way of effective treatment in the form of medical marijuana.

 

We must demand that the officials we have elected to represent us and our values approve medical-marijuana legislation that reflects a fact-based understanding of this effective treatment and compassion for those in need. We must encourage our legislators to be brave, to have faith in the facts and to not succumb to irrational, non-fact-based fear.

 

Call your legislators today and encourage them to vote for the medical marijuana bill pending in the Legislature.

http://www.thestate....e137667983.html


Edited by Sidestreet, 15 March 2017 - 04:49 AM.

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#57 Alder Logs

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:17 AM

 

It is time for democracy to work. The State reported in October that 78 percent of South Carolinians supported medical marijuana.

 

What's democracy to do when the populace supports recreational use?  Will we then defer to his majesty, the dictator, and the LEO establishment and prison/industrial complex who will be stuffing his pockets? 


Edited by Alder Logs, 15 March 2017 - 10:18 AM.

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#58 Arathu

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:32 AM

We're not going to attempt logic and reasoning with psychotics are we.................?

 

All I can say is wear body armor.......if at any time you prove yourself correct and embarrass them they will shoot you...........

 

His/Her majesty.....................hahahahahahahaha.....................holy fuck I spit coffee all over my keyboard..........

 

A


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#59 Sidestreet

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 06:33 AM

Have you seen this?  Have you heard about this?  ;)

 

 

Canada introduces legislation to legalize marijuana

 

By Rob Gillies

For the Star Tribune

4/13/17

 

 

TORONTO — Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government introduced legislation Thursday to let adult possess up to 30 grams of marijuana in public — a measure that would make Canada the largest developed country to end a nationwide prohibition on recreational marijuana.

 

Trudeau has long promised to legalize recreational pot use and sales. U.S voters in California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada voted last year to approve the use of recreational marijuana, joining Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

 

The South American nation of Uruguay is the only nation to legalize recreational pot.

 

The proposed law allows four plants to be grown at home. Those under 18 found with less than five grams of marijuana would not face criminal charges but those who sell it or give to youth could face up to 14 years in jail.

 

"It's too easy for our kids to get marijuana. We're going to change that," Trudeau said.

 

Officials said Canadians should be able to smoke marijuana legally by July 1, 2018. The legislation must still be approved by Parliament but with Trudeau's Liberal party holding a majority its passage in considered assured.

http://www.startribu...uana/419395364/

 

 

This is great news for Canadians AND Americans.  Like dominoes they fall! 


Edited by Sidestreet, 15 April 2017 - 06:33 AM.


#60 jkdeth

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 08:29 AM

Concerning the opiates vs cannabis, ironically I know someone who needs pain meds and can't get them because of testing positive for cannabis. For him this lead to heroine addiction.




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