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An interesting composting idea


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#1 PsyBearknot

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 07:42 PM

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May not be accessible $$ wise for most in the urban core. But a company that seems to be looking in the right direction
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#2 Arathu

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 08:28 AM

High....I'm Arathu and I'm addicted to clicking the "LIKE" button....................... :cool:


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#3 PsyBearknot

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 09:47 AM

HIGH ARATHU!!!!

#4 Arathu

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 09:49 AM

Did someone make coffee? We can't have a meeting without coffee................hahahahahaha


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#5 CatsAndBats

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 09:56 AM

Did someone make coffee? We can't have a meeting without coffee................hahahahahaha

 

 

Hi my name is Catattack and I am a mycophilliac


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#6 Arathu

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:03 AM

I run out of likes before I can "get there" and it's becoming quite the problem......I think I've lost control..............hahahahahaha Like NOW.....I'm out of likes and it ain't even noon yet!


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#7 CatsAndBats

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 10:38 AM

I run out of likes before I can "get there" and it's becoming quite the problem......I think I've lost control..............hahahahahaha Like NOW.....I'm out of likes and it ain't even noon yet!

well at least you have a gold badge!


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#8 Skywatcher

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 10:40 PM

Nice unit Psy, solutions for small spaces are needed, at least to help reduce the load on the land by all the wasted space in landfills, and the methane gas they create. A big obstacle for small spaces is where to do your composting, and how much space it takes. If you have a small yard, a rotating drum works fast, and takes a small area. 

IMO a great solution is to go to worm composting. Wildeibles did a great thread on this for under the kitchen sink. I will need to search for that. One of the great advantages wit worm composting, is it gives ou a method to deal with small amounts of scrap meat as well as vegetable material !

 

DIY is always a nice option, and sure to be less costly than buying a pre-made unit This is a very basic but effective worm composter and the site has more good links and info,

 

http://wakeup-world....without-a-yard/

 

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DIY Indoor Composting for Tiny Spaces — Learn How to Make Nutrient Dense Soil Without a YardBy Carolanne Wright
Contributing Writer for Wake Up World
As a child of around ten, I remember a class trip to a Native American archeological site. The tribe and other details are long gone from memory, but one aspect is still with me today — the amount of waste the group created over hundreds of years. The buried mound was maybe five feet tall and seven feet wide, if even that large. Compare this to the 251 million tons of trash American’s generated in 2012, and it gives one pause for thought about the sheer quantity of garbage we produce.
Landfill limitations
Of all trash disposed, compostable items in landfills are of particular concern. According to Environment Victoria in Australia: “When organic material such as food scraps and green waste is put in landfill, it is generally compacted down and covered. This removes the oxygen and causes it to break down in an anaerobic process. Eventually this releases methane, a greenhouse gas that is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide. The implications… are enormous.”
Modern landfills have special methods that trap the methane gas and leachate (toxic waste runoff) for treatment, but “even the best liner and leachate collection system will ultimately fail due to natural deterioration,” warns Zero Waste America.
Do we truly wish to inhabit a planet which is overrun with trash that will, in all likelihood, turn toxic? Thankfully, there’s a better way…
Indoor composting to the rescue
Beyond recycling and reducing overall electronic and disposable waste, composting food scraps is a smart choice for shrinking our trash footprint. The main obstacle for many is that they live in small spaces without access to a yard. As luck would have it, making your own compact and efficient indoor composter is straightforward and easy.
 
Vermicomposting
If you’re okay with the squirm factor, worms are hardworking creatures and perfect for an indoor composter.
Materials:
Four black tubs (22 liters each) with one lid
Valve for the bottom tub
Bedding (peat moss, shredded newspaper or mushroom compost)
One pound red wiggler worms (found at your local fishing store or through mail order)
Power drill
Hole saw
1/4-inch drill bit
Method:
Using the appropriate sized hole saw, drill the opening for the value about an inch up from the bottom of the container. Screw in the valve and secure with a wing nut on the backside. Create a seal around the valve with caulking to prevent leaks.
For the remaining three tubs, drill about a dozen holes in the bottom of each so that the worms can move back and forth and fluid can drain.
You will need to lift up the second tub from the bottom to avoid issues with the liquid. A small plastic container in the lower tub works nicely. Drill about a dozen holes in the lid for ventilation.
The bottom tub is simply for liquid collection. To start your worm farm, line a second tub with bedding material, about 4-inches worth of slightly damp peat moss, shredded newspaper (black ink only) or mushroom compost. Add the worms and a small amount of vegetable/fruit scraps. Cover with a piece of cardboard to help retain moisture. Close the lid and place the composter in a cool, dark and quiet place.
When you need to use the compost, prepare a new bin with bedding and food. Place it on the top of the composter and snap on the lid. Over the next few days, the worms will migrate upwards in search of food. Once they are properly lodged in the the new tub, you’re free to remove the middle bin and harvest the compost.
Tips for success:
Chop kitchen waste into small pieces.
Don’t feed the worms anything from the citrus or onion family.
The worm tea that collects in the bottom container is excellent plant fertilizer. Dilute 1 part tea to 10 parts water before use.
Read “Vermiculture: How To Build A Worm Bin the Cheap and Easy Way” for pointers on troubleshooting and creating a successful worm habitat.

Edited by Skywatcher, 21 January 2017 - 10:43 PM.

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#9 Zwapa

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 06:29 AM

 u can see a compost pile, in the garden, as a gigantic worm that digests all this plant material and produces very good soil for your veggies and trees. no need for dirty -icides !

The best way to keep everything healthy and happy ;-)


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#10 wildedibles

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 07:57 AM

I'm with you on the likes I had to refrain some ....hehehe I will be back tho :)

My worm composting under the sink works well for small spaces ...you will need more room as you up the veggie matter tho or the mold wins and you have to regroup ;)

buying one or making a big enough one will work well ...cutting stuff up into small peices works well too

Ive seen some people throw some veggie waste right into the garden like lettuce or peices of tomatoe noting that attrack animals to it and it works really well for small amounts of veggie waste the garden loves it :) ...works like weeding and leaving ...leave the weeds laying on the soil adds lots of nutes back in....long rooted veggies pull up so many metals from deep down and leaving them on the top of the soil will add some of them up at the top where our veggies grow ;) ......like too much green grass clippings it can burn plants so dont add too much ;)

#11 wildedibles

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 08:05 AM

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May not be accessible $$ wise for most in the urban core. But a company that seems to be looking in the right direction


wow that is in the right direction :) now add worms :) ..... I could see an idea like a trash compacter sink thing that cuts the veggie/food matter up then into a bin like that ...that turns it and tiny peices / liquid falls into the bottom bin that you have worms in :) lol eating anything else thats not dirt yet

I like the turning idea as Skye mentioned they have a turning style composting bin for small areas and it is soposed to be very good they can be expensive but not really that bad ....still trying to find a way to make one

#12 Skywatcher

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 11:06 AM

I use a rotating barrel myself, and in the warm months it finishes in about 3 weeks. If it slows too soon, I can kick it hot again by adding some blood meal to the barrel.

Here are some pretty simple designs for rotating barrel tat you can make.

 

http://www.wikihow.c...bling-Composter

 

I also found the link to Wilde's vermiculture thread.... :biggrin:

 

https://mycotopia.ne...orm-composting/


Edited by Skywatcher, 22 January 2017 - 01:10 PM.

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#13 Arathu

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 07:03 PM

I use a rotating barrel myself, and in the warm months it finishes in about 3 weeks. If it slows too soon, I can kick it hot again by adding some blood meal to the barrel.

Here are some pretty simple designs for rotating barrel tat you can make.

 

http://www.wikihow.c...bling-Composter

 

I also found the link to Wilde's vermiculture thread.... :biggrin:

 

https://mycotopia.ne...orm-composting/

...I have access to a basically continuous supply of blue food grade barrels from work too................steel drums, food grade as well. I need to get off my ass and get working on my mushroom farm........... Man I can't wait until spring....... 


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#14 Spliff

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 12:17 AM

Composting is great, did a course once, the guy claims to have composted a horse in two weeks. And if you are doing it right, two weeks is what it should take to go from waste to compost with the correct watering, turning, ratios, and temperature. (Skywatcher seems to be onto it at three weeks).

You know temps in the middle of an active compost heaps can reach as high as 70 deg C. I have seen hot water showers run off this principle, by coiling pipe through the heap.

Worms are sick, too. I'd say worms are better for the urban environment. Plus, if you do that right you should have no smell and some crazy steroid like worm piss for your plants.

Since we are linking cool contraptions, (although this is a bit "out there" as far as DiY goes)

http://www.treehugge...-under-900.html


Edited by Spliff, 28 January 2017 - 12:19 AM.

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#15 PsyBearknot

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 03:20 PM

Composting is great, did a course once, the guy claims to have composted a horse in two weeks. And if you are doing it right, two weeks is what it should take to go from waste to compost with the correct watering, turning, ratios, and temperature. (Skywatcher seems to be onto it at three weeks).
You know temps in the middle of an active compost heaps can reach as high as 70 deg C. I have seen hot water showers run off this principle, by coiling pipe through the heap.
Worms are sick, too. I'd say worms are better for the urban environment. Plus, if you do that right you should have no smell and some crazy steroid like worm piss for your plants.
Since we are linking cool contraptions, (although this is a bit "out there" as far as DiY goes)http://www.treehugge...-under-900.html


Interesting that meat dairy and animal waste is able to be used in the system.

#16 Spliff

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 07:37 PM

 

Yea it is, you wouldn't think of composting a carcass, but it is really effective. In my area there are heaps of chicken farms and fish farms, and there is a little activity by people here exploring how to recycle the dead. Feathers are a great source of nitrogen, as well as hair, and fish well not so sure what they add but I think its around the same.

Ever put blood and bone mix on the garden?

On this course I did we made organic fertilizer, which involved anaerobic fermenting of things like a cow stomach (rumen), as well as other tricks like burning bones with high silica plants (hemp, or rice hulls). When burned in pyrolisis, as if you were making biochar, there is a reaction between the two which sort of changes the makeup of what comes out. The guy called it phosphorylate...? 

Anyway, I find this stuff incredibly interesting, got some bizarre potions that would definitely result in being burned at the stake a few hundred years back.


Edited by Spliff, 15 February 2017 - 07:38 PM.





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