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Blue Honey!


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#1 riseabovethought

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:49 PM

i'm told the best way
is to stuff a jar with intact whole freshies
then pour in warm honey to cover.
leave at room temp several weeks
and pour off the water that rises to surface.
once no more water comes up,
it's ready to go in the fridge,
max. potency preserved.
the honey is magic,
and you can pull out a 'candied' freshie
if desired.

 

This is what I've been exploring and I found this H3 quote yesterday.

Its basically twice as potent, since the pcilocin is preserved.

No drying, no powdering, no heating, Simple, no muss, no fuss.  

All everyone says is 'make sure its bone dry first,' but I dont want to lose the pcilocin.

I feel like I can make it last longer, squeeze and stretch out its goodies better, & store freshies longer, lots of bonuses this way. 

The quote is from this thread- where its discussed further- https://mycotopia.ne...e3 blue honey


Edited by riseabovethought, 28 February 2017 - 11:08 AM.

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#2 hyphaenation

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 01:03 PM

Hey that's very cool! Must try this.

Even with dried/powedered honey seems to preserve and strengthen magik content...can't wait to see freshie honey. You figure no bacterial rot from the rancid water that rises?
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#3 riseabovethought

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 01:11 PM

I should add that honey is in itself quite unique, with properties unlike almost any other substance.

My sister's baby stepped on a long thorn one day awhile back.  They took her to the pediatrician, who couldnt use anethesia since she was a baby, but still dug around in the hole looking for a grip on the thorn, not knowing yet what was going on in there, and unable to get it, just dug out a worse hole, that was turning blacker and blacker.  They were told to soak it in water, which they did, nothing happened except it got worse and worse for a coupla weeks.  Then they soaked it in honey.  The honey actually pulled out the thorn.  It was longer than anyone had suspected and the baby is now fine, because of yes, honey.  Hydrostatic pressure or something.. I dunno, but its magic.  Hospitals all over the world are now using honey in their bandages and for its anti- viral and anti- bacterial properities, but no one suspected it could pull out a long thorn from a baby's foot.  I think its fucking amazing!


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#4 riseabovethought

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 01:25 PM

Hey Hyph!  Thanks for stopping by.  God, you've given us so much, and you're tireless, still doing it!  God bless you sir.  

& You are correct.  It is important to pour off the water, but it isnt rancid.  In fact, I used it in my coffee this morning.  It isnt magic either, which I find interesting.  The magic is being permeated through the honey though.  I think its perfect because where the water was inside the fruits, honey is now inside the cell walls inside of the fruits, so the water is being removed while the magic is being preserved.  

 

(What else can do that?  -Oh yeah, maybe alcohol, but) I plan to microdose in my coffee with this honey, and add more honey on top and more fruits as I go, but no problems yet, and all systems are roaring full steam ahead! 

 

blue-honey1.jpg


Edited by riseabovethought, 27 February 2017 - 04:46 PM.

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#5 riseabovethought

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 02:33 PM

Okay, so to prevent fermentation, which appears to be the reason honey isnt used for preservation in most cases, one must control water and temp.  The honey jar has to be air tight so it cant draw water out of the air, and kept cold below 50 degrees F.  Here's more

 

About Fermentation and Honey:

The main causes of honey spoilage are fermentation and heat. Fermentation is the production of ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide by yeast as it grows and feeds on sugar. The ethyl alcohol may then break down into acetic acid (vinegar) and water in the presents of oxygen. The combined flavors of yeast, alcohol and acetic acid make the honey unpalatable. A number of physical changes also occur within the honey changing its physical characteristics as it ferments.

The yeasts responsible for fermentation are endemic throughout our environment. They are present in all honey that has not been pasteurized. The risk of fermentation is dependant on both the moisture content and yeast spore concentration within the honey and on the temperature at which the honey is stored. According to US agriculture handbook number 335 Beekeeping In The United States

"Honey with less than 17.1 percent water will not ferment in a year, irrespective of the yeast count. Between 17.1 and 18 percent moisture, honey with 1000 yeast spores or less per gram will be safe for a year. When moisture is between 18.1 and 19 percent, not more than 10 yeast spores per gram can be present for safe storage. Above 19 percent water, honey can be expected to ferment even with only one spore per gram of honey, a level so low as to be very rare."

"If honey has more than 17 percent moisture and contains a sufficient number of yeast spores, it will ferment. Such honey should be pasteurized, that is, heated sufficiently to kill such organisms."

Since fermentation is also dependant on temperature it is assumed that the above quotes are for storage at room temperature. Moist honey will not ferment when stored below 50 degrees F or above 80 degrees F. Storing honey at temperatures above 80 degrees F to prevent fermentation is not recommended, the high temperature will damage honey in other ways that are equally objectionable. I recommend that consumers store their honey at room temperature if it will be consumed within 3 months. If your container of honey is too large to be consumed within three months then it should be divided into smaller containers and those that are not in use should be stored in the freezer or refrigerator, only the container of honey in use should be stored at room temperature.

Honey is extremely hygroscopic, that means that it will attract and hold water molecules from the surrounding environment. If it is left unsealed it will absorb moisture from the air and start to ferment at the top surface of the honey. This is not as easily identified as in crystallized honey so make sure you keep you honey jar sealed.

http://kimesapiary.c...mentation.html 


Edited by riseabovethought, 27 February 2017 - 02:34 PM.

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#6 hyphaenation

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 03:29 PM

Super cool thread. Thanks.

 

Reminded me that I'am currently running an experiment in the same sphere as what you are speaking of...preserving freshies. I first mentioned this in the woodlover thread. What I'm doing is preserving live specimins of ps. cyanescens in Hemp oil , frozen in the deep freezer. I learned early on that Hemp oil cannot freeze , unlike Olive , Sunflower, Grape , etc etc. They all freeze solid but Hemp oil is completely liquid while frozen. A bunch of ideas and inventions come to mind baring this in mind ...

Here's a short-list of possibilities:

 

Preserve cultures indefinitely with intact mycelium / stipe sections
Preserve fresh magik mushrooms indefinitely

Preserve fresh edible mushrooms such as morels / pines etc (cut in sections)

First thing I did was harvest some small cyan fruits , cut off the bottm and rinse t clean , roll on a paper towel to dry and then place in a small jar of Hemp seed oil , covering completely. That was placed in the deep freezer since last October (5months ago). I check today and the fruits look exactly as they did the day I preserved them. I'm tentatively calling this invention "Hempseed Oil Cryo-Preservation" ...

I have previously used Hempseed oil to milk cubensis mycelium and then preserved that in the freezer and it lived after 6 months of storage and vigorously grew after being taken out of freezer and used as inoculant. This led me to think about preserving more then just strands of mycelium suspended in Hempseed oil.


Here's the cyan fruit bodies after 5 months in Hemp Cryo-Preservation

  • post-104353-0-72620000-1488227087_thumb.

Super happy with the look of the preserved cyans. The flesh is still robust and tight. 
 

  • post-104353-0-39809400-1488227136_thumb.

It appears that the "goodies" are still intact ...

 

  • post-104353-0-38785500-1488227111_thumb.

I'll do a write-up about all this later. Thanks for sharing the space. Just thought I'd give a sneak peak on that related testing. 

 

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Edited by hyphaenation, 27 February 2017 - 06:40 PM.

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#7 riseabovethought

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 03:38 PM

Holy Shit!  Okay, I am not surprised that you're several light years ahead of me.  But that is damn cool!  Actually, come to think of it, cryopreservation using hemp oil might be even more effective than whats currently used with its own set of problems.  Blood is drained and then vessels filled with formaldehyde, but I never liked that part.  I could imagine hemp oil being used more effectively for humans/ animals cryopreservation, which is actually an up and coming next big thing- at about the same cost as burying or cremating one's body.  You might want to talk to some people about your invention Hyph.  I doubt its very well understood for its non- freezing properties.  Man, I love how you always make me think!   


Edited by riseabovethought, 27 February 2017 - 04:00 PM.

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#8 hyphaenation

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 04:14 PM

I wish I did capitalism better sometimes ...     :meditate:  More into OpenSource  though

Turns out with or without a flash it's hard to photograph something submerged in Hempseed oil.

Here's a few attempts no flash. Still doesn't do it justice... It's literally still alive under there.


Here's the original thread where I started preserving the cyans in October.
https://mycotopia.ne...90#entry1292422

Attached Thumbnails

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Edited by hyphaenation, 27 February 2017 - 06:07 PM.

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#9 hyphaenation

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 05:04 PM

I'll try this by preserving fresh morels this spring and opening the sealed jar at Christmas. Also thin cuts of Pine mushroom in the fall...


Edited by hyphaenation, 27 February 2017 - 05:04 PM.

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#10 Myc

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 06:49 PM

Very, very cool Hyphae. As usual.......but this one's kinda stellar. I can't wait to see the write-up.

I immediately wondered about slicing mushrooms - gourmets. Freezing shiitakes just makes them a mushy, nasty mess (imo). The liveliness demonstrated in oil storage is very promising. I'm very intrigued.

 

Thanks for the link on the fermented honey also. 

I just finished my beehive and will set it out and bait it this year to see if I can catch my first swarm. 

I didn't realize that certain kinds of honey spoil faster. Good thing we have lots of sage around here as it seems to be the longest lasting. 

That being said, I might be careful of storing fungi in honey for more than a year - but you should be able to tell if it's going south from the cloudy appearance and unpalatable taste. The higher the moisture content - the higher the potential for fermentation (or so it appears). So adding "wet" fungi would certainly increase the moisture content. 


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#11 hyphaenation

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 06:59 PM

Thanks man ! Appreciate your words. If you have access to Hempseed oil please give this a go sometime for anything you deem worthy of preserving. We need some testing and tweaking methinks. Will carry on about that in another thread for sure.

 

I am very keen on this honey business as well ! Very cool stuff.


Edited by hyphaenation, 27 February 2017 - 07:00 PM.


#12 Myc

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 09:50 AM

:archive material:

(Add link to Hyphae's final write-up for redirect to oil storage thread here.)

Subscribed. 



#13 riseabovethought

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 11:03 AM

Are there any other substances that come to mind besides hemp seed oil and honey, that may have some of these important properties?  There are some other novel oils with potential I suppose. -Coconut oil, flax seed oil, fish oil, & olive oil would all make excellent candidates for side by side freshy storage trials.  I wonder how they would compare.


Edited by riseabovethought, 01 March 2017 - 11:53 AM.


#14 hyphaenation

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:14 PM

You are definitely on to something ... Coconut oil for sure for sure is awesome stuff and fits in with our little plan here !


Edited by hyphaenation, 28 February 2017 - 12:14 PM.

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#15 Myc

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 09:43 AM

I've read of storing slants under mineral oil for long-term.

 

I guess what really gets me is seeing how "fresh" the samples in the photos appear.

Even with compromised lighting and reflections it is obvious that those stems appear to have been "just picked" within hours. No excessive bruising or the tattle-tale blue would be more prevalent - which leads my uneducated mind to think that there is little tissue damage (i.e. tissue death). 

This is mind-blowing by itself.

Normally, anaerobic environments are a breeding ground for potentially deadly bacteria - yet the fruit bodies do not appear to be undergoing any type of decay or attack. I'm presuming that there is no oxygen or atmospheric gases under the surface of the oil. 

I've very curious as to why "suffocating" live tissue under oils extends their life.

 

I'm leaping ahead to medical applications. Not just storage of fungi. After all, flesh and plant tissues seem to behave in a similar manner. Both can be grafted, cloned, have similar nutrient requirements, etc......

 

Maybe that's what the heads in jars on Futurama are floating in?? chuckles


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#16 hyphaenation

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 11:09 AM

Looking into creative commons patent on Hemp Cryopreservation...

#17 riseabovethought

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 11:54 AM

I still haven't put the honey in the fridge, but probably should after its separated completely.  IME, the temp doesnt necessarily need to be freezing, but it is true that freezing/low temps slow metabolism, which might help explain it.

 

Unlike the honey, it looks like maybe the water isnt even separating out of the mush with that hemp seed oil.  Maybe the low temps slow the need for that osmosis diffusion to take place?  Where is the water?  If its still in the mush and crystalized, is there any damage associated with that I wonder?


Edited by riseabovethought, 01 March 2017 - 11:56 AM.


#18 hyphaenation

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 12:34 PM

This is why I chose small narrow stiped specimins...to reduce the inner area of flesh against freezing. Thought of slicing fruits in half lengthwise to keep girth/width narrow.
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#19 hyphaenation

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 12:41 PM

I assume there will be some cell damage. Not sure the extent. I do know strands of busted up mycelium live suspended in frozen Hemp oil. I'd say the thinner the material ,the less chance of freeze-damage. Maybe cut very thin slices to preserve? Lets experiment...got Hemp seed oil?
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#20 hyphaenation

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 04:06 PM

Maybe you can also preserve freshies in frozen honey the exact same way as the Hemp oil. Use the more liquidy honey or melt the thick stuff , add freshies , and freeze.

Hmmm

Edited by hyphaenation, 01 March 2017 - 04:06 PM.

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