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Late stage green mold in monotub


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#1 archersmark

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 01:26 PM

I just had to throw away 6 monotubs that each started showing trichoderma (green mold) on small sections of their top, they were 100% colonized and ready for fruiting.  These were 6 of the most beautiful, consistent tubs I've made thus far.  I'm wondering if allowing them to colonize in the same room I was fruiting in could be part of my issue, as I had fruiting tubs that got contamination.  

 

I've removed everything from the room and sprayed walls, ceiling and floors with bleach spray.  Glad I invested in re-covering the entire room in FRP panels.

 

thoughts? reassurance appreciated.  

 

 



#2 Ferather

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 02:10 PM

Usually if you can guarantee a clean substrate, and setup, it will most likely be from exposure.

If you have a grow room or tent, spores can stick around inside if not cleaned.


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#3 coorsmikey

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 02:32 PM

I would look more into the substrate you're using and also balancing the PH for optimal growing conditions for what you are trying to grow. Watch your temps too. Anything thing you can do to give the friendly mycelium the upper hand and give the trich less favorable conditions. Start with testing the PH and seeing where you're at to begin with. Your sub should be slightly above 7 to start with in the beginning. You can start a little higher too and over time the sub becomes more acidic then eventually succumbs to trich anyway. When working with tubs and especially if you're working with a lot of them, one can only work as clean as possible and you will never be 100% clean, no matter how many times you bleach the walls. One can more easily dial the environment favorable for our friends than can clean a room while still being able to inhabit such area.

Edited by coorsmikey, 17 March 2017 - 10:57 AM.

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#4 MLBjammer

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 03:38 AM

What's your pasteurization method?  Longer is better--3+ hours is what I do.

 

Plus, everything Mikey said is spot-on, of course.


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#5 archersmark

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 10:27 AM

What's your pasteurization method?  Longer is better--3+ hours is what I do.

 

Plus, everything Mikey said is spot-on, of course.

I steam pasteurize between 145 to 165 but I've been doing 2 hours, so noted that I need to extend this out.  

 

 

I would look more into the substrate you're using and also balancing the PH for optimal growing conditions for what you are trying to grow. Watch your temps too. Anything thing you can do to give the friendly mycelium the upper hand and give the trich less favorable conditions. Start with testing the PH and seeing where you're at to begin with. Your sub should be slightly above 7 to start with in the beginning. You can start a little higher too and over time the sub becomes more acidic then eventually succumbs to trich anyway. When working with tub and especially if you're working with a lot of them, one can only work as clean as possible and you will never be 100% clean, no matter how many times you bleach the walls. One can more easily dial the environment favorable for our friends than can clean a room while still being able to inhabit such area.

Very much wisdom in this post.  One skill I have not been working on is measuring PH.   It just struck me as odd that the tubs looked fantastic from the beginning, fast mycelial growth, my popcorn grain spread to the substrate and took over evenly, condensation on the walls of the tub looked even (not dried out like my previous tubs), and then after exactly 3 weeks of beautiful growth and 100% colonization, then and only then do I see any green on the top of the tubs.  To be fair when I pitched the tubs in compost, I did notice one of the six tubs had mold on the bottom of the tub as well, which reaffirmed my overly cautious stance of not trying to salvage the tubs by spot-treating the mold spots.  Thanks for the advice 



#6 CatsAndBats

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 12:05 PM

Pasteurization serves two purposes, to kill competition which are mesophiles, and to breed thermophiles which help to protect the substrate by producing endospores that occupy the substrate surface. The killing part happens in the first two hours but the thermophiles orgy happens the entire time. Going past the two hour mark also allows said thermophillic bacteria to consume and metabolize the dead mesophiles.

As I understand it, but I'm just a cat with a dead bat.
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#7 Ferather

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 12:30 PM

"As I understand it, but I'm just a cat with a dead bat."

 

:biggrin:



#8 MLBjammer

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 05:07 PM

2 hours pasteurized should be enough.  I would say the contam was something else.

 

I would only worry about PH levels if you are using straw or peat moss, which can tend to raise the level a bit.  If you are using any kind of dung, coir, and/or vermiculite, I wouldn't bother.

 

Hey, a cat with a dead bat already has dinner, so things could be a lot worse :tongue:


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#9 CatsAndBats

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:09 PM

2 hours pasteurized should be enough. I would say the contam was something else.

I would only worry about PH levels if you are using straw or peat moss, which can tend to raise the level a bit. If you are using any kind of dung, coir, and/or vermiculite, I wouldn't bother.

Hey, a cat with a dead bat already has dinner, so things could be a lot worse :tongue:


I pasteurized it before I ate it.
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#10 Ferather

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 07:37 AM

lol






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