Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Canary Traps


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Sidestreet

Sidestreet

    May your tracks be lost...

  • App Administrator
  • 7,583 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 29 March 2017 - 04:49 AM

I love this cloak-and-dagger stuff:

 

 

A canary trap is a method for exposing an information leak by giving different versions of a sensitive document to each of several suspects and seeing which version gets leaked. Special attention is paid to the quality of the prose of the unique language, in the hopes that the suspect will repeat it verbatim in the leak, thereby identifying the version of the document.

The term was coined by Tom Clancy in his novel Patriot Games, although Clancy did not invent the technique. The actual method (usually referred to as a barium meal test in espionage circles) has been used by intelligence agencies for many years. The fictional character Jack Ryan describes the technique he devised for identifying the sources of leaked classified documents:

Each summary paragraph has six different versions, and the mixture of those paragraphs is unique to each numbered copy of the paper. There are over a thousand possible permutations, but only ninety-six numbered copies of the actual document. The reason the summary paragraphs are so lurid is to entice a reporter to quote them verbatim in the public media. If he quotes something from two or three of those paragraphs, we know which copy he saw and, therefore, who leaked it.

https://en.wikipedia...iki/Canary_trap

 

 

How might a hypothetical Han Solo use the canary trap to find out which of his amis are faux?


  • TVCasualty, Juthro, Heirloom and 1 other like this

#2 CatsAndBats

CatsAndBats

    [^._.^]ノ彡 & /|\( ;,;)/|\

  • OG VIP
  • 8,109 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 March 2017 - 08:12 AM

I love this cloak-and-dagger stuff:

 

 

A canary trap is a method for exposing an information leak by giving different versions of a sensitive document to each of several suspects and seeing which version gets leaked. Special attention is paid to the quality of the prose of the unique language, in the hopes that the suspect will repeat it verbatim in the leak, thereby identifying the version of the document.

The term was coined by Tom Clancy in his novel Patriot Games, although Clancy did not invent the technique. The actual method (usually referred to as a barium meal test in espionage circles) has been used by intelligence agencies for many years. The fictional character Jack Ryan describes the technique he devised for identifying the sources of leaked classified documents:

Each summary paragraph has six different versions, and the mixture of those paragraphs is unique to each numbered copy of the paper. There are over a thousand possible permutations, but only ninety-six numbered copies of the actual document. The reason the summary paragraphs are so lurid is to entice a reporter to quote them verbatim in the public media. If he quotes something from two or three of those paragraphs, we know which copy he saw and, therefore, who leaked it.

https://en.wikipedia...iki/Canary_trap

 

 

How might a hypothetical Han Solo use the canary trap to find out which of his amis are faux?

 

 

Stop making me look up french and latin!


  • tailsmcsnails likes this

#3 tailsmcsnails

tailsmcsnails

    "DOOR"

  • Black VIP
  • 490 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:27 AM

When I was at Uni I wrote a big big paper for a major percentage of my final mark in my final year. Because I was a dork I included the inappropriate adjective 'mellifluous ' about 10 pages in to the 20 pages total. I think I thought it was funny or that the lecturer really just scanned when he marked.

Anywho, I left my final copy in my drawer in the lab, stupidly, and another student helped herself and plagiarized great chunks of my work... Including mellifluous. Pretty funny canary!
  • Sidestreet, Myc, Coopdog and 2 others like this

#4 archersmark

archersmark

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 138 posts

Posted 30 March 2017 - 10:55 AM

When I was at Uni I wrote a big big paper for a major percentage of my final mark in my final year. Because I was a dork I included the inappropriate adjective 'mellifluous ' about 10 pages in to the 20 pages total. I think I thought it was funny or that the lecturer really just scanned when he marked.

Anywho, I left my final copy in my drawer in the lab, stupidly, and another student helped herself and plagiarized great chunks of my work... Including mellifluous. Pretty funny canary!

Did she get caught? 



#5 Juthro

Juthro

    dope smoking hillbilly

  • OG VIP
  • 4,892 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 March 2017 - 12:18 PM

I love Tom Clancys' work, he is a gifted story teller and author. I always have a hard time getting started with them, as they have so many characters that you have to be introduced to and remember. But once I get in them a ways and the story line gets going, they are very hard for me to put down.

I had forgotten the name, but I remember the technique :)

Edited by Juthro, 30 March 2017 - 12:21 PM.

  • Coopdog likes this

#6 Coopdog

Coopdog

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 2,106 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 March 2017 - 12:53 PM

Yes a very gifted author. Hard to believe he is not an ex military man himself for all the detail he writes in.


  • Juthro likes this

#7 Alder Logs

Alder Logs

    Shiitake Novice 206 Logs

  • OG VIP
  • 9,668 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 March 2017 - 02:14 PM

That's funny, the only Clancy book I ever read was The Hunt For Red October.  I could not take that it was dripping with so much flag waving nationalism with all the rah rah for our team stuff; us good, them bad.    I did, however go see the movie at my first opportunity.   I was very sure it would make a great cinema thriller, and they would not be able to put in that same level of nationalist propaganda without ruining it.  I even have my own copy of the movie and still watch it occasionally.   I have a pretty good collection of submarine movies.  Subs made me crazy.  The Vietnam war cured my nationalism.


  • Sidestreet, Juthro, Heirloom and 1 other like this

#8 tailsmcsnails

tailsmcsnails

    "DOOR"

  • Black VIP
  • 490 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 30 March 2017 - 05:27 PM



Did she get caught?


Nah. Long story short she was a "friend" and a very ordinary student, she needed all the help she could get. I Let the friendship die after that. Now I would say something but then I was like 22.

#9 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • OG VIP
  • 10,720 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 April 2017 - 07:17 PM

 

 

How might a hypothetical Han Solo use the canary trap to find out which of his amis are faux?

 

I certainly have no idea whatsoever, but I've heard from one guy that using varying (but consistent) packaging works. For example, every container that Mr. A or anyone in his circle of friends receives is red. Every container Mr. B (etc.) receives is blue. Mr. C gets green ones, etc..

 

At some point, when people that that guy had never met were discussing the contents of said packages, a simple query about the color of the packaging would be very helpful in tracking down the leaky source of what was otherwise supposed to be confidential information. This approach could be modified for just about any context.

 

 

A harder-core method might involve letting it 'slip' (i.e. make it subtle!) that one will be transporting a large quantity of contraband in a vehicle on a specific date, then loading up one's car with a strange looking package while acting paranoid and going for a drive. If more than one person is suspected of being leaky, set a different date to leak to each different leaker (a week or more apart to ensure things don't get bunched-up and confusing) and perform the loading-up-and-going-for-a-drive act on each specified date. If, while following every traffic law to the letter, one gets pulled over and searched anyway then conclusions can be drawn and adjustments made accordingly. It might be best to let the suspected leaker "find" the info on their own since most people ascribe more credibility to information they believe they have uncovered themselves than something they were explicitly told (e.g. a semi-cryptic note on scrap paper 'accidentally' left where they can see it, etc.).

 

Lastly, since it's ultimately a numbers game then an effective preemptive/proactive approach would be to minimize the number of people who qualify as 'friends.'

 

 

This is all hypothetical, of course.

 

 

Edit to add: What's the deal with the tags for this thread? They're kind of odd considering the topic, and I'm seeing really odd tags in other threads as well.


Edited by TVCasualty, 10 April 2017 - 07:24 PM.

  • Sidestreet and tailsmcsnails like this

#10 Alder Logs

Alder Logs

    Shiitake Novice 206 Logs

  • OG VIP
  • 9,668 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 10 April 2017 - 10:48 PM


 

Edit to add: What's the deal with the tags for this thread? They're kind of odd considering the topic, and I'm seeing really odd tags in other threads as well.

 

 

Who needs the fuckin' tags.  They're just tiring out my scroll wheel finger.  Looks like someone did a tweak of the program, because there were many threads that had none not too long ago.  Or, is someone just adding tags to every thread they land in?

 

It wouldn't hurt my feelings (or the overall bandwidth of the world wide web) if they were just disabled.


Edited by Alder Logs, 10 April 2017 - 10:52 PM.


#11 August West

August West

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 3,216 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 11 April 2017 - 12:21 AM

Tom Secker at Spyculture does a lot of interesting research - mostly about the intersection of the security state and popular culture. His podcast, "ClandesTime" is currently working on a multipart series titled, "An Alternate History of Al Qaeda"

 

He has a couple of podcasts on Clancy including a couple of related FBI documents from Clancy's file...if you're into all that sorta thing.

 

 

[Direct Link]

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by Sidestreet, 11 April 2017 - 06:26 PM.
Added videos to post per request

  • Sidestreet and CatsAndBats like this

#12 Heirloom

Heirloom

    practitioner

  • OG VIP
  • 4,173 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:34 AM

The us army made me crazy and they cured me of nationalism. I became a better person as a result.


I have employed canary traps for my own safety years ago, though I didn't have a name to call these traps. I used them to un-mask informants and those with loose lips who provide info as a gossip.

I have found that some chemicals are useful to un-mask people, and gather info
from them for my safety.

Be careful with what you say and do.

people who brag are insecure and seek to self boost their self esteem .
others listen for gossip to inform.

BEWARE of those that asks you to retell a story of the past.

Edited by Heirloom Spores, 11 April 2017 - 11:37 AM.

  • Sidestreet likes this

#13 Alder Logs

Alder Logs

    Shiitake Novice 206 Logs

  • OG VIP
  • 9,668 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 11 April 2017 - 01:24 PM

I'm very fortunate to have been able to get rid of most of my secrets.   The stuff I did for government, submarine shit, which is still under any non-disclosure conditions, are things that are nothing compared to what's been written in non-fiction best sellers, so I don't think I need worry about even that.   My dips into dealing and property crime, though shallow, only showed me quickly that I didn't have the psychological stuff for making money those ways.   I love spy, and even police detective stories, but I have no need or desire to live it.  


  • Sidestreet and Heirloom like this

#14 Sidestreet

Sidestreet

    May your tracks be lost...

  • App Administrator
  • 7,583 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 11 April 2017 - 06:28 PM

 

BEWARE of those that asks you to retell a story of the past.

 

This may be a dumb question, but why?  I mean, as long as it's long enough ago that it falls outside the statute of limitations and there are no connections to the present?

 

 

 

I love spy, and even police detective stories, but I have no need or desire to live it.

 

I hear you.  Paranoia is just not good for the health.



#15 August West

August West

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 3,216 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 11 April 2017 - 07:41 PM

Paranoia is just not good for the health.


Says the moderator at a site that discusses LSD and other schedule I mind-bending molecules :)
  • Sidestreet and coorsmikey like this

#16 Sidestreet

Sidestreet

    May your tracks be lost...

  • App Administrator
  • 7,583 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 12 April 2017 - 04:41 AM

:tinfoil: :biggrin: 






Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!