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Fatal Overdoeses on Opiods in the United States


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#1 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:02 AM

Saw an interesting video by Mike Rowe that tied a bunch of interesting things together:

1.) Monopoly Board Game
2.) Massive unreported fires and slaughter of cattle in "Fly over country"
3.) Opiod Deaths

Mike Rowe Fatal Opiod Statistics.jpg

[Direct Link]


Edited by SteampunkScientist, 30 March 2017 - 11:48 AM.

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#2 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 09:38 AM

Video link and embed not working.



#3 riseabovethought

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 10:27 AM

Man, I cant really find what it was.  Im looking but Rowe's got so much stuff.  Sounds interesting though.  Maybe the Scientist'll be back soon and give us another link..



#4 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 11:48 AM

Fixed!
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#5 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 02:35 PM

The video brought to mind, an old friend's book, Prairie Fire, by Dan Armstrong.  I bet some of you would enjoy it.

 

pfcover.jpg

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by Alder Logs, 30 March 2017 - 02:35 PM.

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#6 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 03:09 PM

Excellent Book suggestion Alder:


Book Review: "Prairie Fire" by Dan Armstrong

Review by Peter Eberhardt

"Prairie Fire"
Author: Dan Armstrong
Publisher: iUniverse

Despite all that’s gone wrong, we’ve got something big going for us right now,” says National Grange President Forest Mahan to a grange hall full of angry farmers in response to a grain harvest shortfall in Asia that has the wheat they sold cash-advance in January for $4.50 a bushel selling at $12 in June. “The grain reserves are down to almost nothing. Meaning what we have in the field right now in wheat and corn represents a sizeable portion of what’s available worldwide. Until that’s harvested and hauled off to the man we promised it to five months ago, we’ve got some serious leverage in this situation. How to best make use of that leverage is what we’ve got to figure out tonight. And mostly it’s just us working together. Without that, we might as well all go home and sell our land at a loss. Forget next year’s crop. Forget the kids’ college education. Forget it all. Buy a tie, some black oxfords, and move into the city.”

 

“To hell with the middlemen,” calls back someone from the crowd. “Another two bucks a bushel or burn it all!”

 

“Then we go right from the frying pan into the fire,” returns Mahan to the boiling mob before him. “That will get us nowhere.”

 

But the Midwest farmers have had it. Eight days later, a million acres of ready-to-harvest wheat goes up in flames in reaction to the dynamics of the market. A stunned American audience watches it all happen live on network TV, followed by such a rapid surge on the commodities market and equivalent fall on Wall Street that the markets are forced to close early. The director of Homeland Security lashes out at the farmers and the field burning, calling it an act of domestic terrorism and a threat to National Security. Two days later the National Guard is sent out to guard the amber fields of grain, and a tense standoff in the Heartland cuts a swath right across the political center of the United States—with a presidential election five months away and the future of family farming square on the line.

 

This sets the stage for Dan Armstrong’s powerful political novel “Prairie Fire,” an action-packed suspense story that is both great fun to read and, perhaps more importantly, a serious appraisal of American agriculture and the international grain market. Rarely in any kind of book, fiction or not, do we get this kind of multilayered overview of the lines of power, threading down from the board rooms of the corporate elite through the halls of Congress and the trading floors of the commodities markets, all the way down to the men and women who tend the land and feed the world.

 

“Prairie Fire” unfolds like a Tom Clancy novel, with the world grain market at the center of a vast money-laundering operation and the American farmer set up as the fall guy. Real-life characters who wear work boots and drive combines are mixed up with renegade commodities dealers, double agents, the Chinese mafia, the transnational petroleum industry and dirty politics clear up to the president of the United States. This is a compelling read from start to finish with a story line that seems so likely and relevant, it will have you looking to the morning newspaper to see if it isn’t there!

 

While at heart a rousing adventure story, it’s clear “Prairie Fire” author Dan Armstrong has taken pains to give a human face to the very real predicament of today’s family farmer—and an American tradition all but driven out of existence by the industrial “big-guy-does-it-best” model of agriculture that dominates modern farming and exhausts the soil. The reader gets to, figuratively, sit across the table and hear the real-world complaints of American farmers, suffering at the hands of an agricultural system that is both antiquated and broken. In the words of fictional National Grange President Forest Mahan, the American farmer has become “little more than an indentured servant to the merchant class.”

 

And this is the setting that prompts the nation’s farmers to undertake their first serious effort at unification since 6,000 tractors drove into Washington, D.C., as part of the American Agricultural Movement in 1979. Led by a charismatic retired army colonel turned farmer, Nathaniel Cromwell, and Grange President Mahan, the Nonpartisan Farmers’ Alliance is formed. After the first mass field burning, when the Farmers’ Alliance has the focused attention of the grain industry, the government and the nation as a whole, Colonel Cromwell makes the grain industry an offer through a grainy video much like what we’ve seen from Osama Bin Laden: “We want a cut of those industry profits or we will systematically burn our fields in million-acre chunks until we do.”

 

What ensues is a wild cat-and-mouse game where the National Guard attempts the impossible task of guarding 400 million acres of farmland stretched out from the Allegany Mountains to the Washington Palouse. Using only CB radios and word-of-mouth to communicate, the renegade colonel and an invisible army of farmers, looking like every other red-blooded American in the Midwest in blue jeans and ball caps, outsmart, outmaneuver and effectively hold hostage the entire summer grain crop as the key piece in a monumental collective bargaining strategy. While the action will keep you turning pages, the story’s backdrop contains an important look at the mechanisms of the world grain market, placed in the larger context of soil depletion, petroleum dependency and a changing climate.

 

Told in the wide panavision of the Great Plains, this is a novel with the potential of becoming a blockbuster movie. It’s a big story with big themes. The alliances and double-crosses of the characters in “Prairie Fire,” combined with intrigue at the highest levels of government, make for an absolutely gripping read. Only one question remains for this reader: Is there a producer in Hollywood out there ready to take this story on?


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#7 Alder Logs

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 04:01 PM

 

Is there a producer in Hollywood out there ready to take this story on?

 

There's the question, all right.  With all wider movie distribution being under the control of the six corporations that control all media, from television to publishing, even a great movie made from this book would have a difficult time reaching a wide audience. 

 

Dan asked me read an early draft of the manuscript off a CRT computer screen.  The only time I ever did that, and the only time I have ever been called on to proofread anyone else's writing.  It was not a typical job for lysdexic eyes such as mine.  My only criticism of the overall work was that toward the end, my sense of its so far believable realism wavered slightly.   When I mentioned that to Dan, he said he felt he had to do it that way because, as I had also suggested to him, this work of fiction could easily turn into The Turner Diaries for an actual farmer's rebellion.  It was like he had been called to "stop making sense."   One of the characters in the book was partly based on his old friend, "Alder," though in the way of an inside joke. 


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#8 Alder Logs

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 02:16 PM

Back to the opiods:

 

[Direct Link]

 

Marijuana-Prescription.jpg


Edited by Alder Logs, 03 November 2017 - 02:28 PM.


#9 pharmer

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 05:56 PM

Agreed that it's not likely to get past the censors as is

 

Oliver Stone as Director/Producer

 

Long bearded Tommy Lee Jones as "Alder"

 

he's been warming up for this role in the Men In Black series, and No Country for Old Men

 

As far as the opiate crisis - I smell a rat. The recent public opinion campaign to get people on board the idea that there is an epidemic and "something must be done" has a familiar smell about it. Can't quite put my finger on what this is but my gut says it ain't what it appears.


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#10 Skywatcher

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 08:25 PM

As far as the opiate crisis - I smell a rat. The recent public opinion campaign to get people on board the idea that there is an epidemic and "something must be done" has a familiar smell about it. Can't quite put my finger on what this is but my gut says it ain't what it appears.

Its IMO the usual these days, bait and switch.

Create an epidemic and the illusion that it is being dealt with, to take the attention away from massive pharmaceutical profits and manipulation, and distract from the royal screwing planned for health care.

Further empower the insurance companies to make their own medication coverage decisions in their favor, regardless of what the attending physician prescribes or the reasoning............................ 


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#11 CatsAndBats

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 02:34 PM

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#12 Alder Logs

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 03:36 PM

I got a little bottle of oxycodone as a door prize for passing my last kidney stone about ten years ago.  I finally took about three of them for a toothache earlier this year.   You know, I bet that was illegal!    I didn't have permission from a legal pusher to do that.


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#13 phlegmbae

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 02:56 PM

Crap! After 5 years without any opioids, I had the disc in C4, C5 rupture spontaneously last march, and I've been on very low dose Oxycodone(5mg) ever since. I don't abuse them at all. I've been down that road, and the opiates become harder to get off than the pain they were prescribed for in the first place! IOW.... I don't want to do that again, but just going raw without something stronger than Aleve, really wasn't an option. It just didn't cut the pain. Now I have to lock my Oxy's in my safe, or my wife will steal them. After her double radical mastectomy in 2013, and a  life threatening accident in 2015, she's become addicted. I don't like to see her sick, but I don't want to fan the fire either.

Now I wish she never went to the hospital with me when my neck thing started. I never would have told her I was on them.   


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#14 Coopdog

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:00 PM

Opiate related deaths have literally killed off the majority of the people I grew up with in the last year and a half. The problem is very real back in central Ohio where I come from originally. The economy is so bad that SO MANY people have to get on Disability or SSI  to live, and there is a cadre of drug pushing doctors in town that prescribe percs by the quart size containers to half the town. Many people sell their meds to make ends meet and then there is the bootleg ones laced with CAR fentanyl. People who are too ignorant to know better, and I say that with no malice but more realistically than not, think that they want the "good stuff" laced with that fentanyl variation because they have heard it is hundreds of times stronger than opium. They get it, and then they are dead. Many of the oxy pills are bootleg ones laced with that crap.

 

Now you can't tell me with the information available to law enforcement and the electronic data they collect on all of us that they don't know who the people are that are pushing this stuff. They KNOW who is doing it and they let it happen. It's killing people like flies and they are up there reaping the dollars out of it at the big pharma companies while the people die. They know there will always be more poor people to feed this beast.

 

Last time I went home everywhere I went people were passing around plates with lines of oxy on them like we used to pass around joints. Scares me to death because even my 76 year old father was partaking. I never imagined such a thing getting so popular! I tried telling people about the terrible things all that Tylenol does to your liver to no avail and actually got laughed at for my preaching. I cannot imagine snorting a huge pile of crushed acetaminophen to get the little bit of actual oxy into my blood stream and was so glad I can't tolerate opiates. If I had not left there when I was a kid I fear I would be there doing the same thing, but probably would have been one of the first of the dead as I always did have an addictive personality. Anyhow enough ranting and I will step off my soapbox now.

 

Peace...


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#15 Alder Logs

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 06:46 PM

trump_medellin.jpg

 

 

[Direct Link]

 

Here's that referenced article:

 

https://colombiarepo...in-soccer-team/



#16 Soliver

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 01:17 PM

Opiate related deaths have literally killed off the majority of the people I grew up with in the last year and a half. The problem is very real back in central Ohio where I come from originally. The economy is so bad that SO MANY people have to get on Disability or SSI  to live, and there is a cadre of drug pushing doctors in town that prescribe percs by the quart size containers to half the town. Many people sell their meds to make ends meet and then there is the bootleg ones laced with CAR fentanyl. People who are too ignorant to know better, and I say that with no malice but more realistically than not, think that they want the "good stuff" laced with that fentanyl variation because they have heard it is hundreds of times stronger than opium. They get it, and then they are dead. Many of the oxy pills are bootleg ones laced with that crap.

 

Now you can't tell me with the information available to law enforcement and the electronic data they collect on all of us that they don't know who the people are that are pushing this stuff. They KNOW who is doing it and they let it happen. It's killing people like flies and they are up there reaping the dollars out of it at the big pharma companies while the people die. They know there will always be more poor people to feed this beast.

 

Last time I went home everywhere I went people were passing around plates with lines of oxy on them like we used to pass around joints. Scares me to death because even my 76 year old father was partaking. I never imagined such a thing getting so popular! I tried telling people about the terrible things all that Tylenol does to your liver to no avail and actually got laughed at for my preaching. I cannot imagine snorting a huge pile of crushed acetaminophen to get the little bit of actual oxy into my blood stream and was so glad I can't tolerate opiates. If I had not left there when I was a kid I fear I would be there doing the same thing, but probably would have been one of the first of the dead as I always did have an addictive personality. Anyhow enough ranting and I will step off my soapbox now.

 

Peace...

 

 

That's terrifying ... If I saw my old man snorting oxy, I think I'd wig right the fuck out.

 

You should school those folks on a cold water extraction at least ... granted, it's not as sexxy as snorting stuff (too much Scarface) but if they're gonna be addicted, may as well save the liver for ethanol abuse ....

 

:)

 

soliver


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#17 Coopdog

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 04:09 PM

Man Soliver funny you should say that. I tried to do exactly that. They looked at me like I was nutz. "Put it in water??? WTF for???" Keeping their liver is not real high on their priority list I guess, and to hell with their sinuses as well. 

 

As for the old man, well man you can't tell him anything. He has always been a hell bent partying old biker, and he will probably die that way and BTW he still isn't one you would want to try to push around, if you know what is good for you lol. The problem is very real man. Most of my old druggie friends back there don't even smoke pot anymore, so they can maintain their pain relief programs and pass the UA's associated with them. 

 

Scary stuff...


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#18 riseabovethought

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 12:12 PM

Interesting new fun fact:

Aboput 15K people died last year from opioid related ODs.  Another 15 thousand people died from synthetic drug adverse effects.  I think these new man made substances are going to start to overtake and quickly eclipse even the already bloated opiate death toll.  People better start getting those kits and know what they're taking at all times.  People better really start getting it that stakes are high when it comes to ingesting whatever.  That most certainly also applies to the sick animals harvested for our meat we're eating and the veggies covered in pesticides and with every living system in decline and that decline accelerating, I think its up to us and what we do with the next ten or twenty years if we're going to save mankind.  Pharma is the most profitable biz on Earth, primarily from dying Americans.  How sick is that?  We cant get single payor healthcare for all because no one wants to cover anyone else, we do not care enough about our fellow countrymen.  I've heard once that it'd be a whole nother world if we thought of each other as family members, really...as brothers and sisters.  There's a lot of truth to that.  And circling back to OD deaths; they are only rivaled by the huge numbers of suicides- mostly recovering war veterans, who again we do not care enough to take care of them effectively.  How sad.    


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#19 Alder Logs

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 01:07 PM

 

...it'd be a whole nother world if we thought of each other as family members, really...as brothers and sisters.

 

The key here is in First, know thyself.   We wouldn't have to think of anything as anything, as it would be seen as true.  So, every time we come to some idea of identity, some notion of who and what we are, turn it into a question.  But not a question to answer, rather a question to hold.  

 

When I think I am this or that, look into it and ask; "What is it, and how do I come to such an idea?"   Do I know it, or is it simply a belief? 

 

Certainly there are physical facts about a held identity in a body, but how is it we hold so strongly to the idea that we, as consciousness, are limited and separate as such?  Are we not more?  

 

The more defined we take ourselves to be, the more estranged we become from the oneness of all.  Closer, more intimate than even brother or sister, we become when it is seen how we create our own limits and boundaries, as when we do, we ascribe this vision in projection, and thinking, "it's just how it is."   When we see to freeing ourselves, we free all of us. 

 

When it is clear that we have mentally created our own limitations as to who and what we are, do we not have empathy for all who are doing the same?  


Edited by Alder Logs, 02 January 2019 - 02:01 PM.

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