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First grow log: Exploring a new hobby


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#121 CatsAndBats

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 10:44 AM

 

GODDAMN! Well done sir, well done.
 
Just keep those dry fruits out of the sun light.  :biggrin:

Thanks  :wub:  Will do! 

I'm still wondering what makes some of them grow so big. I can have two trays with the exact same spawn and recipes and one will be mostly small ones and the other has a few massive ones. Both end up with about the same yield in terms of weight but such a difference in size with the same genetics is just weird  :huh:

 

 

You're still working with multispore correct? There are countless sets of genetics in one spore print, which will express themselves all over the place.

 

When one starts narrowing down the genetics through isolation or through printing, one will see more consistent fruit sizes (and/or whatever trait one is trying to harness) IMHO/IME.



#122 MrModeon

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:17 AM

You're still working with multispore correct? There are countless sets of genetics in one spore print, which will express themselves all over the place.
 
When one starts narrowing down the genetics through isolation or through printing, one will see more consistent fruit sizes (and/or whatever trait one is trying to harness) IMHO/IME.


That's the thing, I'm using isolates  :tongue: 

 

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?



#123 CatsAndBats

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:19 AM

 

You're still working with multispore correct? There are countless sets of genetics in one spore print, which will express themselves all over the place.
 
When one starts narrowing down the genetics through isolation or through printing, one will see more consistent fruit sizes (and/or whatever trait one is trying to harness) IMHO/IME.


That's the thing, I'm using isolates  :tongue:

 

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?

 

 

 

 

 

6416d3c22555ee75bf4987ff45c564e4.png


Edited by CatsAndBats, 06 July 2017 - 11:20 AM.

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#124 Microbe

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 12:17 PM

You're still working with multispore correct? There are countless sets of genetics in one spore print, which will express themselves all over the place.

When one starts narrowing down the genetics through isolation or through printing, one will see more consistent fruit sizes (and/or whatever trait one is trying to harness) IMHO/IME.


That's the thing, I'm using isolates :tongue:

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?
How do you define a sector?

#125 MrModeon

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 01:54 PM

 

That's the thing, I'm using isolates :tongue:

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?

How do you define a sector?

 

Lines like mentioned here. It was just one single growth. 



#126 CatsAndBats

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 02:32 PM

 

 

That's the thing, I'm using isolates :tongue:

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?

How do you define a sector?

 

Lines like mentioned here. It was just one single growth. 

 

 

 

The second picture was cloned but not isolated completely out, and still had plenty of sets of genetics.

 

Pure isolates should look like this:

 

diversity-03-00136f7-1024.png

 

Species Coprinellus aff. radians found here:

 

http://www.mdpi.com/...818/3/1/136/htm

 

Effect-of-medium-on-mycelial-growth-of-M

 

 

Species Metacordyceps yongmunensis, found here:

 

https://www.research...e-EFCC-C-2134-A



#127 MrModeon

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 03:00 PM

I dug one up so you guys can be the judge

 

photo_2017-07-06_21-59-32.jpg



#128 CatsAndBats

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 03:04 PM

I dug one up so you guys can be the judge

 

attachicon.gifphoto_2017-07-06_21-59-32.jpg

 

 

Do you live near a nuclear power plant? I have no idea.



#129 Microbe

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 04:00 PM

That's the thing, I'm using isolates :tongue:

I've even checked to see if something went wrong (and I did have multiple genetics) but all the agar plates I dropped the solution on showed no sectors, just one single isolate. Weird, huh?

How do you define a sector?
Lines like mentioned here. It was just one single growth.
Lines are not the only signs of sectoring and even they can be so small you cant see them with the naked eye. Any irregular growth is to be considered sectoring. Just because you have a isolate doesnt mean the culture or parts of a culture cant begin to sector again. Its not fully understood what makes mono cultures, isolates, pure cultures, or what you prefer to call them, begin to sector. Also keep in mind cultures are not limeted to sectoring on agar, any media in which they grow on and consume cant allow for mycelium to begin to sector.

I dont know your culture like you do? Is that how all your other mono cultures looked like of the same culture? Was it perfect radial growth, no leading edge advancing quicker or falling behind? That is a fully grown plate, and without seeing it growing out across the plate its hard to judge that.

Screenshot of a PDF i have on my phone, PSU is my first to go to place for advance learning! I know some are weird about downloading unknown files but if you want it, i posted a link where you can get it. It is a short read on culture care and maintenance. I think everyone should read this regardless of skill set.

https://www.google.c...ueRVBb3o6JW_q9Q
be99c3a3754526e8a83f54586299e24d.jpg

Edited by Microbe, 06 July 2017 - 04:25 PM.

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#130 Microbe

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 04:36 PM

GODDAMN! Well done sir, well done.

Just keep those dry fruits out of the sun light.

Thanks :wub: Will do!
I'm still wondering what makes some of them grow so big. I can have two trays with the exact same spawn and recipes and one will be mostly small ones and the other has a few massive ones. Both end up with about the same yield in terms of weight but such a difference in size with the same genetics is just weird :huh:
Genetics are the primary factor but not the only. We cant change the genetics of a culture but instead we place a culture into a enviroment so that it can perform up to its maximum potential genetically possible. Which leads me into my next comment.

Just because you have the same recipe, spawn ratio and etc, you can still get slight to major variances in performance. The first thing that comes to mind is density, texture, and moisture or how the moisture flows through the substrate. The density and texture will vary from tub to tub and lets say a example would be a little more straw collected in a single spot might not allow for water to flow as freely through the sub.

Im not saying thats the cause but is a possibility. Microbial life, nutrients, ph, temps, chemicals, and etc can all play a factor. There could be nothing wrong your culture bit instead a environmental factor can be the culprit.

Kick Ass AA grow!

#131 MrModeon

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 05:04 PM

Lines are not the only signs of sectoring and even they can be so small you cant see them with the naked eye. Any irregular growth is to be considered sectoring. Just because you have a isolate doesnt mean the culture or parts of a culture cant begin to sector again. Its not fully understood what makes mono cultures, isolates, pure cultures, or what you prefer to call them, begin to sector. Also keep in mind cultures are not limeted to sectoring on agar, any media in which they grow on and consume can allow for mycelium to begin to sector.

I dont know your culture like you do? Is that how all your other mono cultures looked like of the same culture? Was it perfect radial growth, no leading edge advancing quicker or falling behind? That is a fully grown plate, and without seeing it growing out across the plate its hard to judge that.

Screenshot of a PDF i have on my phone, PSU is my first to go to place for advance learning! I know some are weird about downloading unknown files but if you want it, i posted a link where you can get it. It is a short read on culture care and maintenance. I think everyone should read this regardless of skill set.

So you're saying it's possible for a culture to start 'dividing' on its own? Crazy stuff those fungi!

 

From what I remember the ones from LC looked like a perfect circle from the start, the ones from agar looked like this: paint.png The lines were very even though and the weird shape was probably because I put the agar in on its side. 

Interesting link, thanks! I'll check it out, seems to always be something new to learn  :tongue:

Genetics are the primary factor but not the only. We cant change the genetics of a culture but instead we place a culture into a enviroment so that it can perform up to its maximum potential genetically possible. Which leads me into my next comment.

Just because you have the same recipe, spawn ratio and etc, you can still get slight to major variances in performance. The first thing that comes to mind is density, texture, and moisture or how the moisture flows through the substrate. The density and texture will vary from tub to tub and lets say a example would be a little more straw collected in a single spot might not allow for water to flow as freely through the sub.

Im not saying thats the cause but is a possibility. Microbial life, nutrients, ph, temps, chemicals, and etc can all play a factor. There could be nothing wrong your culture bit instead a environmental factor can be the culprit.

Kick Ass AA grow!

True, there are always differences and that might be the cause. The main difference that I can imagine is moisture content: the substrate on the bottom of the mixing box is probably a bit wetter than up top. It could also be how flat the sub and casing layers are.

 

But still, the difference seems like such night and day that it makes you wonder it that would be 'enough'  :tinfoil: I'll try the same culture on my upcoming grow and see if I can replicate the weird stuff. Maybe I can find a pattern to explain the big boys. 

 

And thanks!  :wub:


Edited by MrModeon, 06 July 2017 - 05:04 PM.





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