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Switching to medicinal/edible


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#1 OGNate

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:45 PM

So after much discussion with the girlfriend I think I'm going to be moving from basic cubes to some of the more complicated mushrooms to grow.  I am planning on doing this indoors, I know this limits the number of species I can work with but I'm planning on moving across the country within the year and from what I have read many species take a long time to develop as they work directly with trees or other plants to develop (correct me if I'm wrong).

 

Are there any recommendations for switching over?  I read white buttons grow similarly to bulk grows in that they love manure based substrates, but I was looking into oysters, reishi, portobellas, shitake and lions mane.  I know shitake requires wood, was thinking of making some cultures and knocking up tubs of hardwood pellets.  The others I still have some research ahead of me but figured I'd post to get some insight.

 

Good vibes everyone.


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#2 Arathu

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 07:09 AM

There's no limits aside from our resources, hahahaha, to the numbers of different fungi we can work with......

 

Since I'm doing exactly what you're headed for you might find some new skills very helpful to you as you move forward.........

 

While not absolutely necessary........Agar work is at the top of the list in my book.......it has opened doors that were barred by having to order spore syringes and relying on others......one makes clones, germinating spores from prints, isolation and cleanup, and even finding fruiting strains (part of isolation) on agar. Various reactions and training/conditioning of specific fungi can be done by additives and on and on......it really open a new world up....... 

 

Surely it depends on your motivations but the list you called out seems to be a good place to go as we expand our skills. Right now I have Elm oyster from agar plates to significant grain spawn, Lions mane on plates, Reishi on plates, Brown Beech on plates, Maitake on plates, Shiitake on plates, with more planned. Since I own my place and we're zoned agricultural I'll be stacking up some logs and putting others in the dirt. It's in progress here........

 

Good luck and good vibes to you brother..........I highly recommend a copy of Paul Stamets book "Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms" and setting aside funding for lab gear and materials. I know I've certainly found a lifelong pursuit and I hope to sell some to restaurants and private mushroom lovers along the way..........not to mention eat a bunch myself........

 

I really want to get Maitake growing and fruiting out of bags in my basement.............it's a goal and one that can definitely be reached. Eventually I hope to have a small mushroom farm going. I'm in progress.........

 

A   


Edited by Arathu, 06 July 2017 - 07:10 AM.

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#3 Needles

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 07:33 AM

Arathu's advice is on... You will not regret getting Stamet's book growing edible and medicinal mushrooms. From your list I would start with lions mane. It can be grown in bags easily indoors. Have fun with it and try different types and techs. ...
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#4 OGNate

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 03:47 PM

I want to learn to work with agar but have yet to do the legitimate research as to how to do it.  Without a flowhood I was worried I wouldn't get that great of results, even though I have had great success with just my simple glovebox (provided I don't get lazy and skip steps haha).  I'll take your advice though and will have to look into it, I've read a few teks just never actually tried it out.

 

I was actually just looking up that book haha, I found a pdf file online but nothing beats a hard copy, I have no idea how people can read solely with kindles these days it just doesn't feel the same to me.. but I also have a tendency to highlight and write side notes so that might play a big part :tongue:.  I was also looking into Mycellium Running because I've seen some great reviews and I like the concepts it goes over from the description.

 

Taking your guys advice into account I think the first species I'm going to try are going to be lions mane and possibly oysters, I wish I could work outdoors but like I said I don't think I'm going to be in this state long enough to get good results, we'll see though I'll look into different types and see the possibilities, since they are endless who knows!

 

Gonna be starting a new notebook on the different teks for different species as my cube one is now filled front to back haha.  Got some purchases in the near future to make!  Appreciate the good vibes  :biggrin:


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#5 Myc

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 06:20 PM

https://mycotopia.ne...s-banzai-style/

 

I began my journey into agar by following the above tek. 

If you can do cubes, you may find Oysters a bit simple. I didn't care for their taste. Woodlovers are your challenge.

Reishi is fairly easy and rewarding. Shiitake are a bit more difficult but very very tasty. If you decide to get into spawn bags Enoki are slam-dunk easy and very tasty. 

I have yet to try Lion's Mane but they look pretty simple. 

 

All good choices. 


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#6 Nsnail

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 01:17 AM

I've had great luck with agar in my still air box.

Using a no pour tek where you fill little jelly jars with some and sterilize. If you go that route put a small hole in the lid that can be taped shut, then pressure can be equalized with an airport syringe.

Make a bunch as you may introduce outside contaminants on the first few before you get the hand movement right. Use lots of alcohol and keep track of which fingers touch what, sometimes rewiping / spraying hands and jars.

It sounds like a lot but after a few times the steps become instinct like inoculating a jar of grain.

One day I'll build a flow hood, right now it seems like hepa filters are expensive until I have commercial need for them.
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#7 OGNate

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 10:50 PM

https://mycotopia.ne...s-banzai-style/

 

I began my journey into agar by following the above tek. 

If you can do cubes, you may find Oysters a bit simple. I didn't care for their taste. Woodlovers are your challenge.

Reishi is fairly easy and rewarding. Shiitake are a bit more difficult but very very tasty. If you decide to get into spawn bags Enoki are slam-dunk easy and very tasty. 

I have yet to try Lion's Mane but they look pretty simple. 

 

All good choices. 

 

Appreciate the link, gonna have a cold one and do some research as I have the next two days off from work.  Only growing cubes for one more batch of jars so it's about time to look into this (even though I've got a good 2 months).

 

I heard that shiitake can be a pain, do you think I could grow them on hardwood pellets made for a pellet stove?  I can get woodchips but for 4 dollars a bag I can get 40 pounds of pellets easily, just gotta check and see if there is any additives even though I don't think there would be considering people use them to burn and heat their houses.  I really want to grow them, they're my favorite to cook with except morels but that's a whole other conversation haha.

 

I'm thinking for the first few times going with shiitake (if the above substrate seems to work), lions mane and reishi.  Appreciate the tips!

 

I've had great luck with agar in my still air box.

Using a no pour tek where you fill little jelly jars with some and sterilize. If you go that route put a small hole in the lid that can be taped shut, then pressure can be equalized with an airport syringe.

Make a bunch as you may introduce outside contaminants on the first few before you get the hand movement right. Use lots of alcohol and keep track of which fingers touch what, sometimes rewiping / spraying hands and jars.

It sounds like a lot but after a few times the steps become instinct like inoculating a jar of grain.

One day I'll build a flow hood, right now it seems like hepa filters are expensive until I have commercial need for them.

 

Thanks for the encouragement, since agar doesn't seem expensive by any means I might as well give it a try (how else would one learn otherwise haha).  I think I actually read a tek similar to what you described by hippie3, if you've had good success with it (or something similar anyways) I think I'll go ahead and give it a try!

 

Good call on making a bunch at a time, I've had a whole batch of jars go bad so I know the massive frustration involved in having to start over after 2 weeks deep lol.  From what you said it reminded me of a quote that I read when I first starting cultivating; "There is no such thing as semi sterile, if sterility is in question in any way consider it non-sterile and start over".  Definitely an excellent piece of advice.

 

I was looking into building a flow hood but with the filters costing a couple hundred bucks it seemed better to just buy one pre-built, especially considering what I read talked about having to get a fan that provides the perfect amount of air flow for the filter you're using (correct me if I'm wrong).  Even though now trying to find an article I read by looking up "building a flowhood" it seems there are easy (easier anyways) methods to build one that aren't so specific...  maybe one day haha.

 

Good vibes everyone, appreciate the insight.


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#8 Myc

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 08:20 AM

I heard that shiitake can be a pain, do you think I could grow them on hardwood pellets made for a pellet stove?

 

Yes you can!

I've not done it personally but there are some teks which use pellet-stove fuel (wood pellets) as a substrate. 

 

Here is recipe shared with me privately by A. Friend:

5 lb. formula
830g oak sawdust (pellet fuel)

30g gypsum (can use less, I think this is a max)

30g corn gluten meal (also a max, some species may like less nitrogen)

1360ml hot tap water

15ml H2O2 (27.5% concentration, added to the tap water. Best to use a syringe for this.)


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#9 Nsnail

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 02:59 PM

IMG_6593.PNG
Found this going through shroomology last night.

Myc's recipe has the enrichment which many species will enjoy, haven't compared these two yet but probably very similar ratios

Typically 15% enrichment (bran) is good

#10 OGNate

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 11:15 PM

Nice, appreciate the recipes!  Thinking of maybe using Snails' to make the sawdust for Myc's recipe as far as bulk substrate.

 

Also I got to thinking, after looking it up it appears when you knock up a log for wood lovers it usually takes around 6-12 months to fruit.  Considering I'm planning on moving in that time frame I'm wondering if I should get a few logs together and use dowels to colonize them so when I move I'll have them fruiting.  






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