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My Salvia Divinorum


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#1 Heirloom

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 05:06 PM

I just got some Salvia D. they don't travel well as brittle as they are and who knows how they were handled getting to me. I am confident I can nurse these back into good shape . I will attempt to clone the broke plant pieces. I have a few leaves that I will attempt to root like a African violet leaf can be rooted and makes a new plant.

I have never tried Salvia and if I ever do it will be the way the Shamans used it over the centuries. I am really excited to grow this special plant.

A special thanks to the member who gifted me these sacred plants.

namaste

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#2 Pan1

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 05:37 PM

Ive chewed dry leaf a couple times, havent put up a trip report here about it yet, but will next time.  i heard from a friend that he tried to chew fresh leaf and he said it was pretty horrible from the taste. i find dry leaf isnt that bad, taste wasnt bad, but the texture of chewing hay for 30 min.  i believe if you use it with the shamans, you eat it fresh which the taste may not be as bad as chewing fresh, because it is only in your mouth a min or so. My friend that chewed it fresh said it got more unpleasant the longer he chewed it.

 

My point is if your going to chew might be worth drying out the leaf first.

 

Very cool Heirloom, keep us posted, im still waiting for my seeds to pop.


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#3 Heirloom

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 11:49 AM

getting some light and fresh air on them has really perked them up. I am confident they are going to do well. I found lots of info on growing them. I love growing medicine plants even if I don't need the medicine some one will. I look forward to sharing these when they get big enough to clone I'll try making seeds but I understand the seeds may not germinate, fun to try though.

I'm going to dedicate a grow box to creating a cloud forest environment hope to get them several feet tall. I read that the leaves can retain potency for several years.

Attached File  SALVIA usersguide.pdf   158.41KB   85 downloads

Attached File  salvia-divinorum-users-guide-pdf 2.pdf   50.71KB   144 downloads

namaste

Edited by Heirloom , 29 August 2017 - 11:52 AM.

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#4 JanSteen

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 02:58 PM

Excuse me for not downloading the PDF's.

I've had Salvia Divonorum for quite some years. They love high humidity (I recommend putting a few of those cups inside ziplock bags to see if they might root better than the rest) but after the roots have developed they can grow like regular house plants. After some adjustment time that is.. Mine grew over 2 foot tall, and eventually started producing suckers. I've had it for 4 years or so, then I kind of forgot about it..
At some point, these plants even proved hard to kill unless you over-water them. I did just that.


Spider mites tend to be a nuisance, but they're usually not that problematic since the plants will just increase their repellent actives.

I wish you good fortune with these babies! I hope they root!

#5 Heirloom

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:40 PM

Yea I got the clone pieces inside a plastic dome.

I'm always open to advise

namaste

#6 Heirloom

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:05 PM

Looking even better

"When mature, Salvia divinorum seeds (technically mericarps
or nutlets) are 1.8–2 mm long, 1(1.2) mm wide, somewhat
pyriform, minutely tuberculate, and dark brown (REISFIELD
1993).
At one time it was believed that Salvia divinorum did not produce
viable seed, and the only manner in which it could be
reproduced was by cuttings (EMBODEN 1972; SCHULTES 1972;
HEFFERN 1974; MAYER 1977; FOSTER 1984). While this belief is
now known to be in error, it is true that S. divinorum only
rarely sets seed. Those wishing to grow S. divinorum from seed
face three obstacles: a low seed set, a low germination rate,
and a low survival rate.
The first inkling that Salvia divinorum did indeed produce
viable seed came from the 1973 book Growing the Hallucinogens,
wherein the author stated that, “This salvia is generally
grown from cuttings, but I know of one instance in which it
was grown from seed” (GRUBBER 1973).
Then in 1980 while working on his Ph.D. dissertation, LEANDER
J. VALDÉS III performed breeding experiments in which
he cross-pollinated 14 Salvia divinorum flowers (using the
“Cerro Quemado” clone and a “WASSON/HOFMANN” clone). 4
flowers were pollinated successfully, and 8 seeds were produced
(not 4 as has mistakenly been stated; OTT 1996). A
photo of these 8 seeds was published in 1987, the first time
that S. divinorum seeds had appeared in print (VALDÉS et al.
1987). These 8 seeds represent a 14.3% seed set, since each
flower has the potential to produce 4 seeds. Unfortunately,
these seeds were killed by overheating in a growth chamber,
and their viability couldn’t be ascertained (VALDÉS 1983).
AARON REISFIELD was the next person reported to attempt pollination
experiments. Self-pollinated plants with 108 flowers
produced 11 seeds—a 2.5% seed set, and his cross-pollination
of 190 flowers produced 24 seeds—a 3.2% seed set
(REISFIELD 1993). Clearly it is difficult to get Salvia divinorum
to produce seed. It has been noted that since the anthers and
the pistils of a single flower appear to mature at different
times (a way for a flower to prevent self-pollination), that
this must be accounted for when hand-pollinating flowers;
both the anther and the pistil must be ripe (VALDÉS 1999).
This may be partially responsible for the substantially lower


seed set that REISFIELD obtained when compared to VALDÉS
(but it could also be argued that VALDÉS’ sample was statistically
small). REISFIELD was able to get a few of these seeds to
germinate, and he described these seedlings growth as
“vigorous” (REISFIELD 1993).
In January 1994 DANIEL SIEBERT collected 70 seeds from “WASSON/
HOFMANN” clones residing at the BOTANICAL DIMENSIONS’
garden in Hawaii. Hand-pollination had not been attempted
on these plants, which means that the seeds were generated
in conditions that might be considered as being similar to
“the wild.” Of 70 seeds, SIEBERT was able to get 12 or 13 to
germinate (a 17.1% to 18.6% germination rate), and only 6 to
survived to maturity. (Clones of these seed-grown plants are
available for sale from SIEBERT’S web-based Salvia divinorum
business.) Unlike REISFIELD’S seedlings growth, SIEBERT described
his own seedlings as growing “very weakly,” and he
has commented that “[t]he seed raised clones seem a bit less
vigorous than some of the Oaxacan material” (SIEBERT 1999A;
Siebert 1999B).
More recently in 1999, BRENT LINDBERG—a commercial Salvia
divinorum farmer in Hawaii (growing about 800 of the socalled
“palatable” clone) collected 305 seeds from his plants.
The plants that produced these seeds were growing in pots
under 70% shade, with approximately 60 inches of rain per
year. They first started to flower in November, and they were
cut back at this time to promote better leaf growth, but by
December there were so many in flower that LINDBERG decided
to stop cutting them back. The seeds were first spotted
in January, when LINDBERG was hand-pollinating flowers;
LINDBERG does not think that his hand-pollination was responsible
for any of these seeds (presumably since he saw them
early-on in his attempts at hand-pollination). Nevertheless,
he did not notice any insects near the flowers, other than a
few ants. The seeds were collected over a 2 month period; by
February 13 LINDBERG had 162 seeds, and he harvested the
rest after this. Only about 80% of the seed had reached maturity.
Germination of 100 of these seeds was attempted, with
31 germinating (a 31% germination rate), and 10 surviving
to maturity. The seeds were germinated in potting soil mixed
with peat moss, and LINDBERG believes that those seedlings
that died (when they just had their first small leaves) did so
due to overly moist conditions (they dissolved from being
too wet). The first seed germinated after 10 days, and the
last seed took over 30 days to germinate. The surviving seedlings
are growing with equal vigor, comparable to that of a
cutting of the same size. As of August, these seedlings were

1–2 feet tall. They are kept outdoors in pots under 70% shade
cloth (BEIFUSS 1999).
Several others were also sent seeds from LINDBERG’S harvest.
In early April, SIEBERT attempted to germinate 20 of these
seeds, of which 3 sprouted (a 15% germination rate), but only
2 survived. The first seed germinated at about 10 days, and
the last at about 18 days. The 2 surviving seedlings are growing
vigorously. The seeds were planted directly into commercial
potting soil, about 1/8th inch deep. The 2 seedlings are
kept in a semi-tropical greenhouse with moderate humidity
and partial shade; by early August one plant was 12” tall and
the other was 21” tall.
WILL BEIFUSS attempted to germinate 27 seeds, of which 9
sprouted (a 33.3% germination rate), and 3 survived. Germination
was done between wet paper towels kept in a plastic
tupperware-style container with the lid half off. Seeds took
6–10 days to germinate. At 3 months old, one of these seedlings
was 9 inches tall and 13 inches wide at the base (leaftip
to leaf-tip), and its growth has slowed considerably (see
FIGURE 7). BEIFUSS believes that this is due to this seed-grown
plant having a more limited root system than a cutting of
similar size would have. The remaining two seedlings (germinated
at a later date) are a sickly yellow-green and much
less vigorous, having only grown to about 1 inch tall after
one-and-a-half months (see FIGURE 6). BEIFUSS does not think
that these will pull through."

https://erowid.org/p...ultivation4.pdf

#7 Heirloom

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 02:09 PM

Hofman, A - LSD, My Problem Child, Chapter 6:


In Search of the Magic Plant "Ska Maria Pastora"
in the Mazatec Country


R. Gordon Wasson, with whom I had maintained friendly relations since the
investigations of the Mexican magic mushrooms, invited my wife and me to take
part in an expedition to Mexico in the fall of 1962. The purpose of the
journey was to search for another Mexican magic plant. Wasson had learned on
his travels in the mountains of southern Mexico that the expressed juice of
the leaves of a plant, which were called hojas de la Pastora or hojas de Maria
Pastora, in Mazatec ska Pastora or ska Maria Pastora (leaves of the
shepherdess or leaves of Mary the shepherdess), were used among the Mazatec in
medico-religious practices, like the teonanacatl mushrooms and the ololiuhqui
seeds.

The question now was to ascertain from what sort of plant the "leaves of Mary
the shepherdess" derived, and then to identify this plant botanically. We also
hoped, if at all possible, to gather sufficient plant material to conduct a
chemical investigation on the hallucinogenic principles it contained.


http://www.sagewisdom.org/hofmann.html






Ride through the Sierra Mazateca


On 26 September 1962, my wife and I accordingly flew to Mexico City, where we
met Gordon Wasson.

#8 Heirloom

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 12:32 PM

They are doing great

They are so delicate that transporting across town or moving them could break them

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#9 sinful

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 05:46 PM

You'll need a whole tub or cpl rows of plants to be able to harvest an amount to produce a breakthrough, trading salvia on here got me my first ever spore prints. Good luck
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#10 Heirloom

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 06:03 PM

Thanks dude. my main goal is to grow and be able to spread this plant to others in time. If I ever try Ska Pastora it will be as shamans have not smoking it as common nowadays.

They are all doing really good
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#11 Heirloom

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 01:35 PM

This piece seems to have sprouted roots above the rockwool substrate, my first instinct it to plant this covering the roots. the second one is a piece that appears to be doing very well. Cleaned off dead leaf and noticed a side branch popping up very tiny.

Well I will post new pics in a month to show the progress. Thanks for looking , advise always welcome

peace


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#12 Heirloom

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 07:38 PM

The Salvia Divinorum Research and Information Center. My plants are doing awesome here's the link to Salvia info, I'll post pix in a few weeks

http://www.sagewisdom.org/

#13 Heirloom

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 07:29 PM

Flowers on my salvia. I must be very lucky. They are very small flowers hope to get seeds, we'll see. I tried to show the square stems but the pics aren't very good.

Weather has turned with temps down to -8F. inside it's warm but my humidity is only 11% inside. All this seems to make challenging to provide fresh warm humid air that cloud forest plant thrive in.

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#14 skunk

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 08:58 PM

Bloody Hell Heirloom!  Those are some of the rarest flowers I have ever seen!  Not too many people can say they have had a Sally D plant put forth flowers.  I have read a few threads on other forms about flowering Sally D.  

 

I'll be following along with your adventure here, some good work you have put forth and some interesting data you have recorded about the flowering parameters needed to produce flowers.  

 

Please do keep us posted as this progress along..  glad I came across this post.  

 

skunk


Edited by skunk, 07 January 2018 - 08:58 PM.

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#15 Rangley

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 05:35 PM

Absolutely perfect plant! You can slowly see where you perked it back up to life!

#16 Seeker2be

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 07:06 PM

I now have 10 plants 4 ft tall and all have flowered but no seeds.






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