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#1 Skywatcher

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:43 PM

Last year I let my lawn die and just maintained my Oak tree because of the drought, and it just seemed irresponsible to waste so much water for grass lawn. It has sat in a state of bare dirt and dead grass, with a few hardy natives that struggled.

 

I have been studying xeriscape, or very low water use landscaping and was finally decided on what I wanted to create that would be somewhat natural looking. I am maintaining a small patch of grass under the tree as that will let it breathe and keep it healthy. The rest is a dry creek made from rocks out of the ground around my home (there are lots) and low water use plantings of grasses, agaves, sages, lavender, and low growing wormwoods and lantanas. The hummingbirds are quite happy with the additional forage, and I am happy with the overall appearance.

 

With the underground drip water system, and the gravel mulch, I can keep these plants happy with 2 waterings a week right now with 100+ temperatures, and come cooler weather, only the tree will need water a few times a week and the rest no more than once a week. If we get rain, none needs additional water.

 

My neighbors (many of which also let the lawns die), have been very interested and asking lots of questions about xerascaping. I have been happy to show what I am doing, and have had several requests to help them design something for their yards. I will never tackle a project like this in August again, but would help with ideas and basic design for the neighbors who know me.

 

I think I am pleased with the results..........

 

post-126525-0-70527900-1504579282.jpg

 

 

front xerascape 1.jpg  front xerascape 2.jpg

 

front xerascape 3.jpg

 

Agave sample

 

agave and plant sample 6.jpg


Edited by Skywatcher, 04 September 2017 - 09:44 PM.

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#2 coorsmikey

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:53 PM

Nice job Skye! I notice that you included your famous trademark circles or orbs in 2D. I can't believe how good it looks. Again nice Job!
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#3 happy4nic8r

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:54 PM

Love the rocks. I also have them all over, and have made a rock driveway, planters, and retaining walls where my cactus and succulents thrive.
When you have a shortage of water, or it's expensive you've got to be sensible about your landscaping, or it'll cost you.

Your place is really nice looking, and probably will get the neighborhood on board with some native plants and use of alternative Xeriscaping. Not sure what that is, but I'm going to look it up!!

Edited by coorsmikey, 04 September 2017 - 10:02 PM.
Added Definition :)

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#4 Spooner

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 10:53 PM

Using rock mulch to let rain go through but still cut down on evaporation is a good plan, looks good also.  Congrats on your work saving that Oak.


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#5 Skywatcher

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 11:14 PM

 I notice that you included your famous trademark circles or orbs in 2D. 

I have a preference for curved lines, and just find them more appealing than straight line. The front bed is actually oval, but I drew it out from out in the street to appear as a circle. If I had a drone, you could see an overhead that makes the sacred geometry incorporated visible. I used fibbonacci spiral, and metatrons cube. The (not very visible) centerpoint has a circular opening, with 6 points from a stone pillar, set in stone triangular formation. I did use 4 quartz points in the construction at the true direction of the four winds, and a much larger generator point beneath the 4 sided central pillar.

 

Obvious to me, but i doubt anyone will ever see that, (but I am sure they will feel it)

Positive vibes.............................................

 

Black tourmaline has been a protective stone used around the home for many years. I did not disturb these.

 

Anything I do has multiple layers beside the surface. I do appreciate the complement Mikey.


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#6 pharmer

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 08:10 AM

Well done! From past descriptions of projects around the house I had pictured a more rural location. But you've made city livin' look good   :)


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#7 Skywatcher

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:34 AM

I have the best of both pharmer. I am 5 houses from the "San Sevaine", which is the natural water settling plain at the base of the Mountains. This is all untouched, protected, scrubland that rises quickly to the edge of Angeles Crest, and a 8,000 elevation. I have all the people free area steps from the door. If I go the other direction downhill, it is all now developed with homes and stores.

 

I am high enough to see the smog line, but not have to breathe it except on exceptionally nasty days. I do have much more fire risk than homes not out on the edge of suburbia......



#8 Alder Logs

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:42 AM

A neighborhood of stucco walls with tile roofs will generally be safe from wild fires.   We in the north coast, however, where it has never dried out in the summers as we've seen over the past few years, could be in an unaccustomed danger.   The rains are supposed to begin in a couple of days from now, but beginning with thunder storms.   I have no front yard of rocks, but of brown grass with a back yard of forest.  


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#9 fungi2bwith

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 12:57 PM

This is what everyone's lawn looks like where I live.....


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#10 Skywatcher

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:42 AM

This is what everyone's lawn looks like where I live.....

 

And thats the point......

S. California is essentially a reclaimed desert and arid scrub land in a majority of the areas. It is one thing to irrigate in the desert for crops, but just to keep green golf course lawns alive is wasteful IMO. I live on the edge of a mountain system, and any water bearing storm systems come from the southern areas either west or east. As a result, when the cloud mass tries to lift over the mountains, it is like throwing a wet sponge at a wall. They drop most of their water on my side. I get without fail 2-3X whatever rainfall is reported only a few miles south of me. 

 

We were once self supplied with water when I moved here. But now, there are about 40,000- 70,000 more homes using the same water supply to keep nice green lawns. It obviously does not work.............. and water is supplemented (for now) with Colorado river and northern California water stores.

 

I am not saying that we should not have lawns at all, they do serve a cooling and microclimate adjusting stablizer, but where possible , eliminate and make the water count, don't just humidify the air by spraying it mid day. I also replaced what grass I maintain in the back where my dogs play, with the newer low water use varieties. You don't even need to remove the old. I just over seeded and/or plugged, and let it get established. Then the water is cut back, the weak varieties die out and the low water usage grass takes over.

 

Our weather is changing, and I have no reason not to expect more drought. I just would rather not contribute to wasting water. If I thought I could get away with it, I would drill my own well as I know I am over one of the largest underground settling areas in the valley edge, but then again, this is how the farmers in central valley got into trouble by unrestricted draining of the underground water tables with no effort at all to monitor or conserve the use as much as possible.

 

I think we are at the point where everyone needs to make effort to use water wisely and not waste. If everyone does not make the effort, the ability to choose will be taken away anyway, as Earth will adjust her circulatory system to adjust as she needs, to maintain and/or adjust the living veneer. We are expendable. She will be a living entity with or without us....... (Just my opinion)


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#11 Spooner

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 11:30 AM

Humans are not a requirement for life on this planet.  When we plunder more in one area than nature can replace, then we push ourselves out of that environment.  This works fine for hunter/gatherers, just move on and let nature recover.  It does not work so well for folks who build large solid stationary homes.


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