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Basic indoor fruiting setup


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#1 Ferather

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 06:27 PM

Basic indoor setup:
 
I'm using CaCO3 with my misting water, as it promotes fruiting with many types, wood ash can also be used.
 
Any CO2 that dissolves into the outer water will convert to calcium bicarbonate.
This will trap the CO2 and also increase the pH of the inner bath.
 
Mist the propagator lid, and the cake, when its dry repeat.
 
Alternatively use a clear or white bag for the lid.
 
1.jpg 2.jpg
3.jpg 4.jpg
5.jpg 6.jpg

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#2 Ferather

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 06:33 PM

Also, if you try the grow-up method, it should produce a dense surface growth when higher O2 is detected.
This will trap in humidity-water, and help prevent infection, it also produces a fruiting base.
 
1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg
 
See image two of the above post for the surface base.

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#3 Hash_Man

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:15 AM

Basic indoor setup:
 
I'm using CaCO3 with my misting water, as it promotes fruiting with many types, wood ash can also be used. ."


This is sounding intresting, when you mentioned 'many types' are you meaning types of mushrooms?

#4 Ferather

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:23 PM

Yes, many types of mushroom. I have not tested every type unfortunately. It effects Oyster, Black poplar, Cubensis, Reishi and Shiitake.

Morels also are known to fruit after a fire, fire in the presence of oxygen produces wood ash, wood ash + rain = fruiting.

 

Wood ash contains about 25% CaCO3 equivalent, as well as other oxidizes, and has a high pH.

 

Wood Ash.jpg


Edited by Ferather, 23 December 2017 - 03:26 PM.


#5 Ferather

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 06:25 PM

If you are adding lime to your substrate make sure you know what the end result will be.

 

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Example:

 

Lets say you have Shiitake strain "47", which likes pH 7 the most.

 

L.edodes - strains pH.jpg

 

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Test substrate:

 

10g wood or other pellets, 20g boiling hot water, [X]g of CaCO3 (mixed with the water).

 

Test the end pH using a reader, adjust the CaCO3 until pH 7 is achieved.

 

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Main substrate:

 

Lets say you needed to add 2g of CaCO3.

 

You now want to build enough for a medium small tub, lets say now 100g dry. That would be x10 everything you did.

Example: 10g of pellets is now 100g, 2g of CaCO3 is now 20g, 20g of boiling hot water is now 200g.

 

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Unknown pH, can't find it:

 

Using your test setup, take readings of various end results, from no CaCO3 to pH 8.0.

Assemble them into 250ml suitable, round, containers, and add a grain.

 

Take note of the pH that produces best visible growth.

 

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You may want to add a little more water and sterilize for fairness.


Edited by Ferather, 23 December 2017 - 06:28 PM.


#6 Ferather

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 06:31 PM

You can also do the same to your misting, and-or dunking water and test none to pH [X].

Mycelium make substrates acidic over time, which can prevent further decay.

 

 

Good luck everyone.

 

:thumbs_up2:


Edited by Ferather, 23 December 2017 - 06:32 PM.


#7 CatsAndBats

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 09:49 PM

What about dung lovers? I baseified some h2o to about 8pH and didn't see any difference when used as my regular misting water.


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#8 Ferather

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 01:38 PM

Wait until it stops fruiting, and then dunk the cake in pH 8 water for 24+ hours. Cubensis substrates, are usually low in acidity, the grain is around 6.5, and coir the same.

You could also do a dunk after each flush to maintain a good pH around the surface area, the dunks will also allow the mycelium to remove waste.

 

Here is a two year old spent block of oyster on paper pellets, in CaCO3 (pH 8.4) water, removing waste and regenerating in O2.

Lots of myco waste being removed from the substrate, fortunately the paper is highly absorbent.

 

IMG_20170323_165905.jpg IMG_20170323_170035.jpg


Edited by Ferather, 25 December 2017 - 01:47 PM.


#9 Ferather

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 02:24 PM

Another example is tea leaves, high in phenol's and very acidic. 3.28g of black tea to 125g of pH 8.4 water produces pH 5.5, pH 7 is neutral.

Cubensis do not target phenol's (no laccase), however it does oxidize materials via other enzymes, phenol's are secondary.

 

By spending the tea bag (removed the phenol's), the pH increased to pH 6.5, phenol's can also be inhibitory.

For cubensis you will now need a primary carbon source to run on, I tested trace sucrose.

 

My cubensis sample fully utilized the tea bag, fully colonizing the bag and leaves.

 

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In addition most fungi grow best in an acid pH, but dung fungi grow best when the pH is around 7, which is the average pH of dung. -- Source.


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#10 OldBear

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 09:27 PM

Yes, many types of mushroom. I have not tested every type unfortunately. It effects Oyster, Black poplar, Cubensis, Reishi and Shiitake.
Morels also are known to fruit after a fire, fire in the presence of oxygen produces wood ash, wood ash + rain = fruiting.

attachicon.gifWood Ash.jpg

I’ve been saving fireplace wood ash for traction on a steep driveway this winter. I’m thinking that any leftover at the end of the winter will get spread on the flats next to the river where we found maitake growing when we moved in this past October. Looked like a prime spot for morels.

Any thoughts?

Edited by OldBear, 29 December 2017 - 09:30 PM.


#11 Ferather

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 03:42 PM

Here you go: https://www.mushroom...h.cynjldg1.dpbs



#12 CatsAndBats

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:16 PM

 

 

The problem is there's only like three to four photographs of people doing it (all posted on shroomery I might add) and they could have easily put the fruits in the tubs. It's supposedly a company called Diversified Natural Products, which sells their wares through a company named Midsummer Exotics, that worked with Michigan State University, but internet searches turns up few photos, no real website and nothing much else.

 

http://msutoday.msu....m-hunt-indoors/

 

https://www.bloomber...vcapId=23777021

 

http://www.producene...ory-cat/739-650



#13 Myc

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:36 PM

I have picked morels locally. Once, I cloned one and grew it out on agar. Tried the slurry - nada. 

That doesn't mean it doesn't work. Just my .02

 

I always find them in sandy areas near a creek bank. Roughly 8 feet above the water level and roughly 8-10 feet from the bank - as well as in the creek banks occasionally. I've never dug down to the rhizome to see what they're fruiting from........if there's a chunk of wood debris or whatnot. I just lean 'em over and then fill the divot with some damp sand after plucking the fruitbody. 

 

In my opinion, it's easier to wait for the wild  harvest than to mess with cultivation. 


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