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Venison Sausage.


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#1 Jeepster

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 02:30 PM

I try not to eat cured meats, but after sharing a bit of the cannabis I grew outdoors this year with a friend, he returned the favor by giving me some venison sausage, and man, is it ever tasty! I'm hooked on venison sausage, Munster cheese, with baby spinach, and sweet onions on rye bread.

#2 Juthro

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 03:34 PM

Do you know what kind of spice mix was used on it? Did he make it himself? I personally like a summer sausage blend with venison.


I don't buy into a lot of the fear associated with nitrites and nitrates for curing meat. It's there to inhibit the growth of botulinum and without it your ham and bacon wont be pink and it wont taste like ham or bacon.

I use curing salts all the time when I slow/cold smoke meat, its the only safe way I know to do it. Without the use of cure salt you should abide by the 40 to 140 in 4 rule. That means you should not take longer then 4hrs with your meat in the temp range between 40F and 140F. To leave uncured meat longer then that in the danger zone is risking food poisoning someone.

You need to know what your doing when you use it though, cuz too much is bad for you. The moral of the story is, do your home work, and follow directions.
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#3 Jeepster

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 05:50 PM

Yes, he made it himself. It tastes like summer sausage seasoning, but I will ask him to verify this.

#4 Juthro

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 05:58 PM

No worries brother, was just curious as to what you liked. I think summer sausage is about the most common/popular mix for DIY meat sticks (probably cuz it tastes killer, :)...

I would like to get me a grinder/sausage stuffer. I haven't had one since I moved to AK.
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#5 Soliver

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 06:35 PM

Pink curing salt is the business.  A decent sack cost under ten bucks online and will last you a lifetime; it only takes a teaspoon per 5 lbs of meat, which means, like ... five teaspoons to preserve Alder for posterity.

 

:)

 

soliver


Edited by Soliver, 17 December 2017 - 06:36 PM.

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#6 Juthro

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 07:04 PM

Pink cure#1 is for meat that will get cooked before it is consumed. Like ham, bacon, corned beef, or any cured sausage that get gets cooked.

Pink cure#2 is for meat that will not get cooked before consumption. Like beef jerky, and dried sausages like summer sausage, and pepperoni.

Pink #1 has sodium nitrite
Pink #2 has sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate (IIRC)

EDIT: Just curious Soliver, would you use alder chips, to smoke Alder Logs....

Edited by Juthro, 17 December 2017 - 07:05 PM.

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#7 Jeepster

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 07:13 PM

you guys crack me up, poor Alder Logs, LOL.


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#8 pharmer

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 09:27 PM

I don't know how he sleeps with Soliver at large.


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#9 pharmer

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 12:34 PM

I don't know how he sleeps with Soliver at large.

Soliver X. Dahmer


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#10 Soliver

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 04:17 PM

Pink cure#1 is for meat that will get cooked before it is consumed. Like ham, bacon, corned beef, or any cured sausage that get gets cooked.

Pink cure#2 is for meat that will not get cooked before consumption. Like beef jerky, and dried sausages like summer sausage, and pepperoni.

Pink #1 has sodium nitrite
Pink #2 has sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate (IIRC)

EDIT: Just curious Soliver, would you use alder chips, to smoke Alder Logs....

 

I never realized there was a difference - mine's pink #1, so do I need #2 for the next jerky batch?  I made jerky with zero pink salt for 20+ years and I'm still standing, so .... hmmm ....

 

I'm not sure Alder would make a good smokin' chip - perhaps its namesake will pop in and give me some advice on that one.

 

:)

 

soliver


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#11 Juthro

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 04:47 PM

I double checked, and I am only partially correct, or I was somewhat misleading at best.

If your doing fairly thin cuts of meat for jerky, that your going to dry and smoke relatively quickly then #1 will work just fine. If your doing a long aging/drying process like summer sausage or peperoni you want the extra kick of the #2.

These guys are where I get my info, and I always try and double check it, cuz sometimes I forget some stuff. Here is a thread that explains it better then me.
https://www.smokingm...6/#post-1706877

And I totally hear you about how they say the traditional ways and recipes that worked for generations aren't safe to use now... I'm pretty sure that's mostly BS.

But I generally try and hedge my bets with food prep on the side of safety. I would rather waste a little time and money then worry about weather or not I was giving the gift of botchalism as part of my x-mas spirit.

Edited by Juthro, 18 December 2017 - 04:48 PM.

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#12 Juthro

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 03:37 PM

Here is a cut and paste from that thread that pretty well covers it all. Credit goes to Nepas, a moderator at the Smoking Meat Forum.

1 level tsp of cure 1 or 2 per every 5lbs of meat. half the meat 2.5 lbs would use 1/2 tsp cure.

CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in the low temperature environment of smoked meats. Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures.

There are two types of commercially used cures.

Prague Powder #1 Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.

Prague Powder #2 Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. (1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.) It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly. Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat. When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe

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