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#1 tizoc4u

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 12:10 AM

Mirando City Wild specimens for Ceremomial use. Im to clean the banged up medicine and root the ones that have a bigger stem. 20180207_115226.jpg 20180207_123223.jpg 20180207_123308.jpg 20180207_155001.jpg
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#2 JanSteen

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 02:27 PM

When taking from nature, I believe one should not take more than one needs. That's ceremonial use for me.
This kind of wild specimen collection can take a giant toll on the natural population. And to be honest, I can't say I'm very fond of that kind of scavenging.

Feel free to disagree, of course.
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#3 onediadem

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 04:03 PM

The sad part about what I see in that picture is whoever harvested those had no idea what they were doing. 


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#4 illigitimateJester

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 05:15 PM

The sad part about what I see in that picture is whoever harvested those had no idea what they were doing. 

Because all of them are cut below where the button meets the root? And now all of those roots out there will most likely die, and not re-grow due to poor harvest technique?

 

That's about what? Like 2-300 buttons there, at about 6-10 years of age....that's at least 1200 years of collective growth.....

 

You can make the trip to the northeast of Phoenix, AZ to the Peyote Way Church and go through a ceremony there with legally cultivated/harvested peyote, without decimating the wild populations....

 

If I were to go to Southern Texas and harvest wild yotes, it would only be 5-10 larger ones with the hopes of propagating them at home and collecting seed and continuing the genetic lines.....This past year, I collected upwards of 30 seeds off of my 2 oldest lophs in my collection.

 

20-30 buttons is enough for a personal experience, what's pictured above is overkill....


Edited by illigitimateJester, 09 February 2018 - 05:24 PM.


#5 Spooner

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 06:31 PM

Congratulations tizoc4u.  That is quite the ceremonial pile of wild buttons.  The other side of the coin is guerrilla gardening.  It is fun to assist nature by transplanting yearlings to semi protected spots near the base of Sagauro or Opuntia where the environment is already supporting cacti, and where youngsters are less likely to be trampled by man or beast.  Yearlings are grown enough to have a solid taproot, and have passed the most delicate phase of sprouting to seedling.  Since they pass this stage in humidity controlled and calibrated beneficial lighting, it's possible to bring +80% of seeds to yearlings.  This is far more success than nature could do with the same number of seeds.  It is emotionally satisfying to mirror Johnny apple seed with your own favorite fruit.  Think of it like restocking trout streams.

 

For those interested, it is best to not cut the root, just trim off the button head without cutting any of the foot.  Several of the pix show cuts made too low but most are cut correctly.  It is important to make sure that buttons do not become extinct in the wild, and remain a sacrament, not just a commodity grown using unhealthy intensive big agriculture methods.


Edited by Spooner, 09 February 2018 - 06:42 PM.

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#6 onediadem

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 07:26 PM

Interesting. I was taught to harvest above the first set of tufts on the button by a Cherokee medicine man.. Must have just been tribe tradition.


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#7 coorsmikey

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 08:11 PM

That’s a lot of cactus to take care of! Since the Dead is already done, I would be happy to root and care for some of those. You know maybe give a hand to help them survive, get some seeds and share those as well. Very safe at my home cuz I can’t eat something that takes so long to grow, I get way to attached.

#8 Spooner

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 08:26 PM

Interesting. I was taught to harvest above the first set of tufts on the button by a Cherokee medicine man.. Must have just been tribe tradition.


That sounds like a great procedure, but I was told to cut at a slight angle leaving a ring of green with the root. The roots I have seen regrown, were cut lower than the tufts, however cutting above the first tufts would clearly be less traumatic, and sounds like a beneficial procedure.

P.S. Agree with coorsmikey, my plants are too special for me to eat.

Edited by Spooner, 09 February 2018 - 08:31 PM.

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#9 tizoc4u

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:06 PM

These are not from wild. These buttons come from reharvested plants for 80 years. because they are puped under ground the subterrenial stem is huge. these were harvested legally by licensed peyotero.

#10 tizoc4u

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:12 PM

I would never take wild specimens. These are from Mirando city, im sure the peyoteros would not shoot themselves in the foot over a small order of 1000 buttons. There was 150 buttons. peyoteros cut half an inch of suterrenial stem. the stem is supper long and must connect to the previous root , plenty of subterrenial stem is left for re roots. these were picked up legally for an equinox ceremony were 65 people are to attend. This was just my small pile that i was to clean and re plant.

Edited by tizoc4u, 09 February 2018 - 11:18 PM.

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#11 tizoc4u

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:32 PM

Spooner the problem with that is introducing the wrong type of specimens. Because these are from jeb county, introducing these to another area could be catostrophic for they will vompete with eachother. Another problem is accidently introducing nematoads or unwanted predators that dont belong in the eco syst3m. However, i could re introduce sterele specimens to is native region. Or graph one of these to produce seeds then throw em out the window as im driving by.

#12 illigitimateJester

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:12 AM

Good to know that these were acquired legally. That information should have been in the first post.



#13 Spooner

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Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:58 AM

Out of likes but love your informative posts.

Thanks, tizoc4u.


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