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Sauerkraut


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#21 wildedibles

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 10:03 AM

Yes I wanna ferment veggies not pickel them.....I was wondering about alcohol content but is all acid not alcohol when done no more alcohol in fermented veggies as yogurt or sourdough bread has no alcohol either
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#22 Juthro

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 12:13 PM

I understand what your saying WildE. But to be clear fermenting is a specific type of pickling, but is not the same as pickling in a high acid% vinegar. 

Here is an exert from the book 'Wild Fermentation' by Sandor Katz that explains it better then I can. (a great book, BTW) 

Pickling covers much ground beyond fermentation. Pickles are anything preserved by acidity. Most contemporary pickles are not fermented at all; instead they rely upon highly acidic vinegar (a product of fermentation), usually heated in order to sterilize vegetables, preserving them by destroying rather than cultivating microorganisms. “For pickles, fermentation was the primary means of preservation until the 1940s, when direct acidification and pasteurization of cucumber pickles was introduced,” according to Fred Breidt of the USDA. Vinegar sterilized pickles offer the advantage of not being perishable; however, certain nutrients, including vitamin C, are diminished by heat treatment, and vinegar pickles do not contain the live lactic acid bacteria found in raw fermented pickles.

 

​Also lactobacillus produces little to no alcohol, though with sourdough you'll get some alcohol  that forms on top of the starter (the clear liquid that forms there is called hooch), but that's mostly a byproduct of the yeasts.  

 

 


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#23 scott_1971_h

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 04:00 PM

The alcohol % is minimal and is likely to be dealt with by intestinal flora before entering circulation.


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#24 wildedibles

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 05:48 PM

:) Yes we want the healthy bacteria to help our guts out :) and fermenting veggies we do not need to eat yogurt or try and find a milk free lactobactilla .....the bacteria found in cabbage has no milk

I believe that eating food is better then a suppliment when we can get it from food why not fill our bellys too ;)

#25 cubesRAbore

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:13 PM

Real krout is both healthy and yummy! Youtube has TONS of vids about it!

 

Anyone interested in probiotics for gut health might also want to look into homemade milk kefir. Not the store BS!

 

IMO it is the king of probiotics!

 

It tastes just like runny yogurt. Like yogurt, It can be flavored a million different ways.

 

It is ridiculously easy to make.

 

Take jar off shelf and pour through strainer, put kefir grains in strainer back in the jar and give them new milk. Drink fermented milk and repeat every day. 

 

The grains expand and multiply like crazy. After a while you will run out of people to give them to and start throwing away a handfull every week or so.

 

I have kept the same grains alive for over 4 years. They just need fresh milk every day. That's it!

 

The fermentation lowers the level of lactose but does not eliminate it so its not good for those who are extremely lactose intolerant.  


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#26 wildedibles

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:25 PM

You can ferment almond milk but Im not having success with it yet....

speaking of youtube I found a good one using a jar

[Direct Link]



#27 wildedibles

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:46 PM

I think im gonna try
red cabbage
yellow carrots
beets a little bit
cucumer
garlic

#28 scott_1971_h

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 06:51 PM

Red sauerkraut makes for very complex, tangy flavours.


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#29 wildedibles

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 07:05 PM

:) my list thre sounds complex too so hoping the flavors work
my son picked up a 1/4 red cabbage the other day so using wht I have
I have a large restraurant pickel jar that I will use to ferment in
I also have peas beans raw in pods and cauliflower and broccoli ....I like the peper idea and tomato for saucees
....ideas and to think about the flavor and what I have lots of and need to perserve ;)
adding to salads as a dressing with a good oil
sauces that are not gmo or loaded with hidden gluten
using an ancient way to perserve the garden bounty :)
healing instead of hurting our bodys as so many additives in todays condements at the store

I have pickeling salt
himalian pink sea salt
and reg cheap iodised salt

which should I use?
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#30 scott_1971_h

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 07:42 PM

You can use any, but the iodised salt will make the resulting product slightly cloudy. Not that thats a problem with sauerkraut.

You can use just plain cooking salt, table salt, sea salt, just as long as it's salt :-).

I think the fine-ness of table salt could make it easier to work with, for 'pulling' the juice out of cabbage. But any salt will work.


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#31 Juthro

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 07:56 PM

I should mention too that weight per volume of salt changes depending on the kind of salt. I do a lot of canning and I can tell you that if the recipe calls for a couple of table spoons of kosher salt, that same measure of kitchen salts will make your recipe too salty.

Table salt has very fine granules compared to kosher, and has more weight by volume. I mixed up a brine one time for chicken and was out of kosher salt. So I used a 1/2 cup (the called for amount) of table salt in its place, and it made the chicken too salty to eat.

If you want to substitute one for the other, you can weigh the appropriate measure of the kind of salt the recipe calls for, and sub that amount of weight of the salt you want to substitute. But your probably best following what ever the recipe calls for, at least for your first batch.

Edited by Juthro, 28 February 2018 - 08:03 PM.

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#32 wildedibles

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 01:19 PM

Thanks to the boys in my house we have started the fermented veggies ...cabbage cucumber and celery

we got pictures too thanks to my youngest (hes taking an art course with digital photos) so he was happy to help that way
Heres hoping for a better gut flora in no time ;)
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#33 CatsAndBats

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 02:35 PM

I should mention too that weight per volume of salt changes depending on the kind of salt. I do a lot of canning and I can tell you that if the recipe calls for a couple of table spoons of kosher salt, that same measure of kitchen salts will make your recipe too salty.

Table salt has very fine granules compared to kosher, and has more weight by volume. I mixed up a brine one time for chicken and was out of kosher salt. So I used a 1/2 cup (the called for amount) of table salt in its place, and it made the chicken too salty to eat.

If you want to substitute one for the other, you can weigh the appropriate measure of the kind of salt the recipe calls for, and sub that amount of weight of the salt you want to substitute. But your probably best following what ever the recipe calls for, at least for your first batch.

 

 

Then why don't the recipes do it by weight? I'm over Imperial, we should go metric.


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#34 CatsAndBats

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 02:39 PM

Real krout is both healthy and yummy! Youtube has TONS of vids about it!

 

Anyone interested in probiotics for gut health might also want to look into homemade milk kefir. Not the store BS!

 

IMO it is the king of probiotics!

 

It tastes just like runny yogurt. Like yogurt, It can be flavored a million different ways.

 

It is ridiculously easy to make.

 

Take jar off shelf and pour through strainer, put kefir grains in strainer back in the jar and give them new milk. Drink fermented milk and repeat every day. 

 

The grains expand and multiply like crazy. After a while you will run out of people to give them to and start throwing away a handfull every week or so.

 

I have kept the same grains alive for over 4 years. They just need fresh milk every day. That's it!

 

The fermentation lowers the level of lactose but does not eliminate it so its not good for those who are extremely lactose intolerant.  

 

 

 

That is fascinating! Fermenting is cool.


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#35 Juthro

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 03:00 PM

A lot of professional kitchens do use weight as their chosen units of measure. Measuring by weight is generally considered more accurate.

Volume type measuring is much more common in home kitchen recipes, where people might not have scales. And measuring by volume is generally faster/easier then measuring out weights on a scale.

But the smaller amount of variance +/- you get with weight measurement becomes more critical when you multiply your recipe to make much larger batches, like a professional kitchen most likely would be making.
So in very large batches, weight measure keep your results more consistent then volume measurements, allowing you to deliver a more consistent finished product to your guests.
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#36 wildedibles

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:59 PM

A lot of professional kitchens do use weight as their chosen units of measure. Measuring by weight is generally considered more accurate.Volume type measuring is much more common in home kitchen recipes, where people might not have scales. And measuring by volume is generally faster/easier then measuring out weights on a scale.But the smaller amount of variance +/- you get with weight measurement becomes more critical when you multiply your recipe to make much larger batches, like a professional kitchen most likely would be making.So in very large batches, weight measure keep your results more consistent then volume measurements, allowing you to deliver a more consistent finished product to your guests.


I didnt know that thanks for mentioning it :) makes sense

I just sprinkeld a good bit over every level of cabbage and repeated till cabage was all cut up
I used reg sea salt mixed with pink sea salt and I used green cabbage....
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#37 Juthro

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Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:04 PM

I think its very cool that your doing this with your boys. This will make memories that will last a lifetime.

Kudos to you WildE :)
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#38 wildedibles

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 05:31 AM

I think its very cool that your doing this with your boys. This will make memories that will last a lifetime.Kudos to you WildE :)


I hope so ;) ......I needed help beating the water outa the cabbage sounded like a teenager job o me :) let out some fustration
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#39 scott_1971_h

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 06:12 AM

 

I think its very cool that your doing this with your boys. This will make memories that will last a lifetime.Kudos to you WildE :)


I hope so ;) ......I needed help beating the water outa the cabbage sounded like a teenager job o me :) let out some fustration

 

lol. At least they won't be ones who think food grows on a supermarket shelf.


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#40 wildedibles

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 12:13 PM

I think its very cool that your doing this with your boys. This will make memories that will last a lifetime.Kudos to you WildE :)


I hope so ;) ......I needed help beating the water outa the cabbage sounded like a teenager job o me :) let out some fustration
lol. At least they won't be ones who think food grows on a supermarket shelf.

Not my boys ;) they have some interest in gathering (berries) lol and mushrooms now and help some in the gardens and we are trying tto raise rabbits but I think we have 3 girls ;) no babies in about a year now...

I wanted my kids to knwo how to cook for themselves so they do not have to eat out or to rely on others to cook for them ....that and with out diet restrictions its cheaper to eat from scratch foods

my olest isnt sure on the taste of this stuff when its done but hes the boy drinking pickel juice to get rid of heart burn so I think he needs it ....used in salads or on a sandwich used as relish ;) bot a meal
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