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Psilocybe Hoogshagenii/Semperviva Var. Convexa


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#1 DonShadow

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

This was my first attempt at growing Psilocybe Hoogshagenii/Semperviva Var. Convexa.

Genetics donated by the good man Mjroomer (thanks pal!). Big thanks to whomever collected this strain, and a nod to Searle Hoogshagen, R.I.P.

 

 

Substrate: Sterilized horse manure compost, 2" thickness.

Casing: Sterilized 50/50 peat moss/coarse vermiculite + oyster shell and calcium carbonate for pH adjustment. 1/4" thickness.

 

Culture cleaned on MYA, clean in three plates and transferred to malt/corn syrup liquid culture. Liquid culture was used to inoculate 1/2qt of millet, which was then expanded to bulk at a ratio of 1:2 grain to compost.

 

Fruiting temperature: 75F

Humidity: 92-95%

Light misting 2x/day.

Fresh air provided with airstones under water and 4" of perlite.

Additional fresh air exchanges provided automatically with a CPU fan on 5 minute/4 hour cycles.

Once pins appeared fanning was cut back to 3 minute/4 hour cycles.

Bach's flute sonatas were played to them occasionally throughout all stages of growth.

 

Incubation: 12 days @78F

Primordia formation: 14 days.

Harvest: 30-35 days (some fruits took longer to mature).

Harvested tray soaked in reverse osmosis water overnight and reintroduced to fruiting conditions on 5 minute/4 hour fanning cycles.

 

Total yield on first flush: 4g dry.

 

Stipes were very thick/dense and readily bruised brown to blue. Caps were a little small, and no spores were produced. I accidentally left the fan on for two hours mid-grow, and I believe this dried and stunted the growth of the caps. I think I'll eliminate the fanning entirely after primordia formation on the next flush. I can't wait to eat some.

 

In the coming days I'll post a description of my fruiting chamber along with a detailed tutorial on its construction, so stay tuned.

 

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#2 CatsAndBats

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

sml_gallery_147940_1513_380.png

 

 

 

 

 

What about casing? Thickness, material/s, time cased, etc...



#3 DonShadow

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Casing: Sterilized 50/50 peat moss/coarse vermiculite + oyster shell and calcium carbonate for pH adjustment. 1/4" thickness.

 

Fruiting conditions were introduced immediately after casing. Casing was applied with a fork to make it light and fluffy.

 

Also sorry to MJroom for getting your name wrong, I get confused because of the similarity to the other MJ :)



#4 elfstone

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Searle Hoogshagen was a Christian missionary and linguist sent to proselytize the fundamentalist Christian beliefs to the Mixe peoples of the Oaxaca region of Mexico by SIL. Like his fellow SIL compatriot, Eunice Pike, who lived with the Mazatec people in Huatla, and translated the King James New Testament into Mazatecan, they looked down upon the people they purportedly served with that supercilious attitude characteristic of white Protestant missionaries and were utterly blind to the essential mystery tradition harbored by these people of the Tradition and demonized the mushrooms as tools of the devil. When you read their writings, they characterize the people they are purportedly there to serve as primitive people embedded in childish superstitious beliefs whom they have come to convert to the true Christian faith (their Catholicism being, of course, just another set of superstitious beliefs that only add to their confusion). Having grown up among the people who collected donations in Sunday collection plates and who had the Eunice Pike books in their church library, I can only say that I am truly ashamed to have been among their rank, albeit unwittingly and naively, as a child. At age 14, thanks to Richard Nixon’s anti-psychedelic movies shown in all the public schools in 1968, which prompted me to go to the source literature (Leary, Alpert, & Metzner; R. Gordon Wasson, Richard Evans Schultes, etc.) I quickly saw through it all and committed myself to answer the call to place the mushroom in the center of my life, as the manifestation of the true Mystery that the fundamentalist missionary Christians had defiled and stepped upon in their ignorance.

I may be completely wrong in this, but I seem to recall reading somewhere that Wasson and Heim initially named this species as Psilocybe semperviva, due to the long-lived nature of the mycelium when grown on agar. It was Gaston Guzman who later classified it as a variant of Psilocybe hoogshagenii.

For those interested in reading more about this piece of history regarding the misunderstanding of the source Tradition, here are a few links:

https://www.sil.org/...ogshagen-searle

http://www-01.sil.or...-remembered.htm

https://mycotek.org/...p?threads/5647/

https://www.amazon.c...w/d/B005J9DW3O/

#5 DonShadow

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Thanks for sharing that Elfstone, I definitely share in your sentiments. Isn't it true though that Hoogshagen was the one to inform Wasson about the tradition?



#6 elfstone

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Thanks for sharing that Elfstone, I definitely share in your sentiments. Isn't it true though that Hoogshagen was the one to inform Wasson about the tradition?

Actually it was Robert Graves, the poet and author of The White Goddess, who wrote Wasson and alerted him of the work of Robert Weitlaner, the anthropologist who re-discovered the use of the sacred mushrooms in Oaxaca in 1936, that led Wasson on the trail. He met Eunice Pike and Searle Hoogshagen as American missionary contacts in the area due to that lead.

https://en.m.wikiped...rt_J._Weitlaner

Wasson documents all this in his magnum opus, co-authored with his wife, Valentina Pavlovna Wasson, “Mushrooms, Russia and History.”

http://www.newalexandria.org/archive/

#7 DonShadow

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Ah, good to have that cleared up. I revoke my nod to Hoogshagen. Thank you for that important correction!



#8 elfstone

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

The search for the sacred mushroom was delayed by WW-II until Wasson’s first trip there, where he struck out on personally trying them, in 1955, but hearing of the existence of curanderos and meeting Don Aurelio, he witnessed their use by him. On returning in June 1956, he managed to have a velada with Maria Sabina, arranged by the Sindico, Cayetano Garcia, which he documents in great detail in The Wondrous Mushroom: Mycolatry in Mesoamerica. The evening of June 29/30 1956, changed everything.

#9 mjshroomer

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

Elfstone, that data is also in my two journals on Maria Sabina and R. Gordon Wasson, in addition to more info i Mushroom Pioneers.  And in numerous other journals and books.  In addition to scholarly articles posted at my website,  Including Robert Graves' 1st experience on psilocybine mushrooms  And Graves also informed Wasson of Schultes two masterpieces on the Aztecs and the mushrooms.  Schultes set Wasson up with Blas Pablo Reko.  Here   is a link to my page of scholarly articles free downloads at my site on the history of those mushrooms.  

 

A Link.   http://mushroomjohn.org/articles2.htm

 

 

This is the best in articles on their history although my bibliography of entheogenic Fungi cites over 3,000 references to hallucinogenic fungi and their related sundry fields of study.  2300 annotations, more than 10,000 cross-references and over 1680 full colored photos from thumbnails to larger images.

 

(1): Angus McDonald's Abuse of Drug Terminology.
(2): Andrew Weil's 1975 High Times Interview - Aug-Sept 1975.
(3): Andrew Weil's Stalking the Wild Mushroom High.
(4): Andrew Weil's The Strange Case of the Harvard Drug Scandal.
(5): Bernard Lowy's Hallucinogenic Mushrooms in Guatemala.
(6): Carlos Castaneda: Fact or Fiction (Obituary News Item).
(7): E. R. Badham's Ethnobotany of Psilocybin Mushrooms, Especially P. cubensis.
(8): Eunice V. Pike's Mazatec Sexual Impurity and Bible Reading
(9): Eunice V. Pike and Florence Cowan's Mushroom Ritual Vs. Christianity.
(10): Gastón Guzmán and Jonathan Ott's Psilocybe stuntzii.
(11): Guzmán, Ott, Boydson and Pollock's Magic Fungi from California to Canada.
(12): Hallucinogens in Native American Shamanism in Modern Life (1978).
(13): Homero Aridjis' Marìa Sabina in Mexico City.
(14): In Memory of Steven Hayden Pollock.
(15): J. Borovicka, A. Rockefeller and P. G. Werner's Psilocybe allenii.
(16): Jonathan Ott's Entheogens.
(17): Jonathan Ott's Recreational Use of Magic Mushrooms in Mexico.
(18): Jonathan Ott's Washington's Magic Mushrooms.
(19): Jonathan Ott and Steven H. Pollock's Interview with R. Gordon Wasson.
(20): Martha Singer's Marìa Sabina's Mistake.
(21): Nat Finklestein's "Honghi" Meester.
(22): Pollock's A Novel Experience with Panaeolus: A Case Study from Hawaii.
(23): Pollock's Liberty Caps: Recreational Hallucinogenic Mushrooms.
(24): Pollock's Psilocybian Mycetismus with Special Reference to Panaeolus.
(25): Pollock's The Psilocybin Mushroom Pandemic.
(26): R. Gordon Wasson Reviews Castaneda's First Four Books.
(27): Robert Graves Reveals his First Voyage on Mushrooms (1958).
(28): 2nd International Conference on Hallucinogenic Mushrooms (1977).
(29): Rolf Singer's Medical Mushrooms.
(30): Sheep and Magic Mushrooms.
(31): Smith, Ott, Singer and Wasson's: Feud of the Shroom Scholars - BIG TIME
NEW (32): Tjakko Stijve's: Psilocin, Psilocybin, Serotonin, and Urea in Panaeolus cyanescens from Various Origin.
NEW(33): Stijve and de Meijer's: Macromycetes From the State of Paraná, Brazil. The Psychoactive Species 4.
(34): Valentina P. Wasson's I Ate the Sacred Mushrooms.
(35): Weston La Barre's Anthropological Perspectives.
(36): Weston La Barre's Psychedelics Galore.
(37): Weston La Barre's Shamanic Origins of Religion and Medicine.

aarainbowline1.jpg
aarainbowline1.jpg

  18 BOOK REVIEWS OF ANDY LETCHER'S
"SHROOMS: A Cultural History"

Alice in Dallas' Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
John W. Allen's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Brian Akers' Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
A Kind Rejoiner by Andy Letcher to J. W. Allen's Review of Andy's Book, Shrooms.
Billy Bardo's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Bwookie's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
DonkaDoo's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
G. V. Guest's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
R. "Rob" Hardy's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Michael Hoffman's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms with 6 Comments.
Jan Irvin's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
James Kent's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
S. Marsh's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
H. Mowrey's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Mr. A. Muscaria's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Onanas' Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Tjakko Stijve's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Jacob Sullum's Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms.
Magickal Merlin "Wizard's" Review of Andy Letcher's Book, Shrooms. 

 

Early Documented Studies of Richard Evans Schultes and Others.

With commentary by J. W. Allen   (1): John W. Allen's Modern Scholarly Research (1900-1938).
(2): R. E. Schultes' The Identification of Teonanácatl: A Narcotic Basidiomycete of the Aztecs.
(3): R. E. Schultes Teonanácatl: The Narcotic Mushroom of the Aztecs (1940).
(4): R. Singer's Mycological Investigations on Teonanácatl: The Mexican Hallucinogenic Fungi Part. 1. (1958).
(5): R. E. Schultes' Teonanacate (teonanácatl): Botanical Sources of the New World Narcotics (1963).
(6): R. E. Schultes' The Plant Kingdom and the Hallucinogens: Part I (July 1969).
(7): R. E. Schultes' Little Flowers of the Gods [High Times, Oct. 1987, with letter from Schultes, 1988].
(8): R. E. Schultes' Peer Review of J. W. Allen's, Springtime Magic (1988).
(9): R. E. Schultes 3 Pers. Comms. to John W. Allen (1989, 1989, 1994).
(10): R. E. Schultes' "Introduction:" to The Sacred Mushroom Seeker (1990).
(11): E. J. Kamm. Jr's Profiles: Jungle Botanist. New Yorker Mag Biography (1992).
(12): Wade Davis' One River: Explorations and Discoveries in the Amazon Rain Forest (Schultes' Bio. 1996).
(13): Wade Davis' R. E. Schultes and his Search for Teonanácatl (1938-1939). Shaman's Drum Journal, 1997.
(14):Jonathan Kandall's R. E. Schultes, 86, Dies. New York Times Obit., April 13, 2001 (2 versions, 1 Photo).
(15): Deborah Lynn Siegel's Richard Evans Schultes, Swashbuckling Ethnobotanist. TRP Mag. Fall, 2001.

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#10 elfstone

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

What a fantastic resource! Thank you!

#11 DonShadow

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Posted 26 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

As promised, here is my in-depth tutorial on the fruiting chamber design used for this grow. Also included are instructions for cultivating the Psilocybe Mexicana mushroom species.

 

https://mycotopia.ne...-grow-tutorial/


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