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Suggested New Book Covers for Metzner, Sacred Mushrooms of Vision: Teonanacatl.


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#1 mjshroomer

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 12:12 PM

Over a decade or so ago,  Harvard alumni and scholar Dr. Ralph Metzner, ask me if I would like to make a contribution to a collection of articles to be presented in an anthology of scholarly papers concerning various sundry fields of research related to psilocybian fungi.  That collection was to be published in the summer of 2014 and would be known as, "Teonan├ícatl: Sacred Mushrooms of Vision."  Cover, Index, and Back Cover of 1st Edition (200 Copies Printed).

 

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In this fine tomb we have two sections.The first is historical, ludible/religious, and  medicinal use.  Ludible is (an epithet that Jonathan Ott wishes will be used in the future when referring to the use of these mushrooms outside of a ceremonial setting. He prefers that word and would like to see more people use this word, 'ludible' as a replacement for the negative term, 'Recreational' drug or 'recreational' use.  btw, it was Jonathan who in the mid-1970s who first coined the phrase 'Recreational' drugs, etc.  Ott wants to remove the stigma of the misuse of that terms from drug enforcement and media sources as he feels that that term has a negative meaning in the ears of the general public who often hear it on the news, tv, etc.

 

The 2nd portion of the book has a lot of personal reports of the effects of shrooms, including many with rewarding experiences noted.  Some scholars such as Tjakko Stijve in a book journal publication book review noted that some of the chapters in that section had titles that were over the top in describing what they had seen or felt while under the influence of the fungi.

 

Later I will post Ott's actual comments to me about this matter because there is a lot of misuse and abuse in drug terminology amongst Law Enforcement's spokespersons, as well as in the media. 

 

What I am getting to here is that after the book was published and the original 200 copies were sold, Ralph asked me if anyone might want to contribute a cover for the 2nd printing which, of course, would be a lot more than 200 books.  And because Ralph was selling the rights to the reprinted 2nd edition, he was seeking a new cover to go on that book.

 

So, as a concerned shroomer who was paid for writing a paper for the book, I went through hundreds of images in my shroom art photos by me, or by me and Wipaporn of Koh Samui, who hand-painted the soft-colored cube and samuiensis T-shirt from my photo design I made for a friend at Shroomtalk website and magazine. 

 

I wish to point out that none of the images I proposed was used for the cover of that 2nd Edition.  However, the new publisher who purchased the right to reprint the book erred in his or their judgement by creating a cover from a photograph of Panaeolus papilionaceus.  That species as most know by now is inactive and was mistakenly misidentified by a mestizo field assistant to Dr. Richard Evans Schultes and Blas Pablo Reko in the late 1930s as being the Teonanacatl sacred mushroom of the Aztec, and by shaman and curandero's in Mexico who were believed to have used Panaeolus papilionaceus in their sacred ceremonial healing and curing rituals.  Years later,  Schultes and many  other scholars, including Gaston Guzman also noted that P. papilionaceus was not active and was never used by the Mazatec or other indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica.

 

In Schultes and Hofmann's various printings of Plants of the Gods, Dick Schultes wrote that the Mazatec Indians still used that species in their ceremonies.  In the late 1970s I had talked to Dick about this mistake which I came across reading his original papers and his descriptions of his and Blas Pablo Reko's herbarium deposits at Harvard, and Rolf Singer's deposits at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.  Even later on, Dick Schultes mentioned to me in a pers. comm. that he would eventually correct that misinformation, but unfortunately he passed away before he could make the changes in his published literature.  

 

I did notice that when Christian Ratsch became the new editor and third co-author for Dick and Albert Hofmann's Plants of the Gods Revised Edition, Christian failed to correct that information.  I have mentioned this in several places over the years.  Dr. Guzman also confirmed my comments to me about the species.  And also provided me with new data on what Indians still use the mushrooms. Now I know, that there are six groups in Mesoamerica and I know what mushrooms they use. That will be in one of my final two issues of Ethnomycological Journals: Sacred Mushroom Studies Vol. X or Vol. XI.

 

So here is the cover of the newer version and the name was changed around from the original printing shown above.  

 

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The late James Arthur and I presented a lengthy paper for Ralph Metzner's reprint. NOt published here but it has been published on my website with added info not in the book.

 

Tjakko Stijve's Book Review from Mushroom the Journal published  by Leon Shernoff in Chicago.

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Mjshroomer  

 

I will post the photos of the proposed book covers that did not get chosen for that reprint below.  

 

Thanks for checking this data out.  And have a shroomy day.

 


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#2 mjshroomer

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 12:35 PM

Here I present the 15 proposed book covers that the new publishers were not interested in seeing.   And as I mentioned above, The poster edged styled cover using a photo from Panaeolus or a simple sketch of Panaeolus papilionaceus to represent the Teonanacatl species of the Aztecs is not an active mushroom in that it doe not contain any psilocine/psilocybine whatsoever/

 

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#3 mjshroomer

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 12:37 PM

While two cubes look alike, they are different when opened up.  My favorites were either the cyan or one of the two cubes for the books cover.  But I still get to share them with all.


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