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Mad Mead (Grayanotoxins)


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#1 Schteuben

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 08:00 AM

A few years ago I read an article about "Mad Honey". 

Now, if you don't know; mad honey is a rare semi-toxic medicinal and hallucinogenic honey made from the pollen of the rhododendron plant. 

 

Grayanotoxins are polyhydroxylated cyclic diterpenes. They bind to specific sodium ion channels in cell membranes, the receptor sites involved in activation and inactivation. The grayanotoxin prevents inactivation, leaving excitable cells depolarized.Ito, S.; Nakazato, Y.; Ohga, A. (1981)

 

Hailing from West Virginia, rhododendrons are our state flower and they are quite literally fucking everywhere. I can look out my window and see one right now. 

So this gave me an idea..

 

What if I could set up a beehive right next to these rhododendrons and try to get mad mead?

 

BUT WAIT.. Theres more!

 

 

I wanted to take it a step further and use the mad honey to make some mad mead. 

Mead was once considered a drink of the gods, and has a medicinal value itself. 

Never have I heard of this drink of the fucking gods, but every time I think about it I get goosebumps. I have just recently started cultivating my own medicinal herbs and fungus, but this is my ultimate goal.

 

What do you guys think? Have you had any experiences with mad honey? any knowledge? 

 

 



#2 Sidestreet

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 08:57 AM

 

This amber-hued mutant’s effects range from a pleasant tingling to dizziness, blurred vision and impaired speech. Worse, it was once used as a weapon of war. In 67BC, King Mithridates’ army left chunks of “mad honeycomb” in the path of the Roman enemy, who gobbled it up, lost their minds and were promptly slain. The honey is also said to have medicinal qualities – from treating hypertension and diabetes to improving sexual performance – when consumed in small amounts. It is more or less confined to the Black Sea region. There, in humid conditions, apiarists herd bees to fields of special rhododendron flowers containing grayanotoxin, and the toxin spikes the resulting honey (incidentally, it is the same poison used by the chief antagonist Lord Blackwood to feign his death in the 2009 film Sherlock Holmes).

 

If you do find yourself in the area and want a taste, you’ll have to dig a bit deeper than supermarket shelves. Ask nicely, and chances are most local shopkeepers will hand over a jar from a stash tucked behind the counter, adding to the old-world mystery of it all. But be very careful: do not spread it on toast, drizzle it over yoghurt or generally treat it like normal honey. A tiny spoonful on the tongue is more than enough; any more and you’re at risk of “mad honey poisoning”, which afflicts a handful of unwitting travellers each year. It is no laughing matter – it causes low blood pressure and heartbeat irregularities, and in extreme – and thankfully rare – cases, can be fatal. This is honey at its most hardcore.

 

https://www.theguard...honey-mead-buzz

 

 

I don't know, sounds too toxic for my taste.  It's got a cool story though!

 

 

 

I'll probably stick to mushroom honey.  It's safe, tasty, and very effective:

 

https://mycotopia.ne...ealthier-honey/

 

https://mycotopia.ne...k-for-cubensis/

 

https://mycotopia.ne...fungi-in-honey/

 

 

I am curious about the whole mead thing too.  I'm sure it wouldn't be too complicated to brew up some psychedelic mead. 


Edited by Sidestreet, 15 April 2018 - 09:04 AM.

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#3 Schteuben

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Posted 15 April 2018 - 04:06 PM

 

 

This amber-hued mutant’s effects range from a pleasant tingling to dizziness, blurred vision and impaired speech. Worse, it was once used as a weapon of war. In 67BC, King Mithridates’ army left chunks of “mad honeycomb” in the path of the Roman enemy, who gobbled it up, lost their minds and were promptly slain. The honey is also said to have medicinal qualities – from treating hypertension and diabetes to improving sexual performance – when consumed in small amounts. It is more or less confined to the Black Sea region. There, in humid conditions, apiarists herd bees to fields of special rhododendron flowers containing grayanotoxin, and the toxin spikes the resulting honey (incidentally, it is the same poison used by the chief antagonist Lord Blackwood to feign his death in the 2009 film Sherlock Holmes).

 

If you do find yourself in the area and want a taste, you’ll have to dig a bit deeper than supermarket shelves. Ask nicely, and chances are most local shopkeepers will hand over a jar from a stash tucked behind the counter, adding to the old-world mystery of it all. But be very careful: do not spread it on toast, drizzle it over yoghurt or generally treat it like normal honey. A tiny spoonful on the tongue is more than enough; any more and you’re at risk of “mad honey poisoning”, which afflicts a handful of unwitting travellers each year. It is no laughing matter – it causes low blood pressure and heartbeat irregularities, and in extreme – and thankfully rare – cases, can be fatal. This is honey at its most hardcore.

 

https://www.theguard...honey-mead-buzz

 

 

I don't know, sounds too toxic for my taste.  It's got a cool story though!

 

 

 

I'll probably stick to mushroom honey.  It's safe, tasty, and very effective:

 

https://mycotopia.ne...ealthier-honey/

 

https://mycotopia.ne...k-for-cubensis/

 

https://mycotopia.ne...fungi-in-honey/

 

 

I am curious about the whole mead thing too.  I'm sure it wouldn't be too complicated to brew up some psychedelic mead. 

 

 

Duuude, so dope! Thanks for that article, and I had no clue I could do all that with the honey!

Seriously a super food. 


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#4 Rangley

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 02:56 PM

You could add powdered mush, or exctracted psilocybin straight to the finished mead.
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#5 Spooner

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 03:12 PM

Mead is a wonderful and easy to make refreshing beverage.  Bees tend to forarge within about 2 miles of their hive.so it is not necessary to be right next to the nectar source.  When one flower is the predominate bloom in an area it is an easy matter to isolate that flavor honey.  Crop hives prior to the flow, then crop again after the flow and what you will get is a distinct honey based on that dominate flow.

 

Good luck, we can always use more beekepers.


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