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Advice on indoor poppies? Please?


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#1 RectalCement

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 04:26 PM

So I want to grow some poppies indoors, either hydroponically or just in pots, and I am pretty much stuck at step 1. Firstly, I've asked some gardeners and they've said that poppies are really hard to grow, and won't flower in their first year, so is expecting any viable plants in my first year just naive? I am also still unsure of what strain and vendor is good, I already have some red Tasmanians but I was also thinking of another strain, maybe hens and chicks but I really have no clue but just some high yield high morphine strain or really any strain that would make a good tea. Then there's the matter of germination. I am so confused on how to go from seed to seedling, I was thinking just get some peat pellets or peat soil in a pot then sow seeds, watering slightly, and give plently of light, but after reading Skunk's poppy threads I'm not so sure anymore. Please, can somebody share their prefered method of germinating as well as how long it takes? Then just actually growing the damn plants. I was thinking a wick hydroponic system with the poppies growing in a cactus soil mix that has perlite, and doing top drip to give the nutrients with a fluorescent grow light and whatever else like a fan or handmade humitidy tent. I really need help with this part, and I know there's no best way, but just people's suggestions on the easiest/ simplest set up to get a good crop with a good potency and yield. I was figuring ~12 plants, but probably less, and even if I just get one plant to grow I'd be ecstatic. I've read Hydroponic Heroin and considering how space and odor aren't an issue, and humidity and temperature shouldn't be too much of an issue, what would be the best method, especially in terms of soil and nutrients, to have a good crop. Basically I need help with everything, from vendors and strain, to germination in regards to soil, temperature, and humidity, and then finally the actual system with everything from soil mix (even air filters seem like a good option for me at this point) nutrient and water delivery, and finally light schedule for best growth. Oh my god please help. All this information is out there, I know, but its all just so scattered, contradictory, unclear, and informal that to a complete newbie like me it is incomprehensible. I would like to preemptively thank anyone who even reads this and I hope my juvenile optimism amuses you. Also if anyone can reach out and get the poppy growing masters ( like Skunk) to read this I will be eternally grateful, so hope that means something to you. Oh god please make this thread be fruitful.
Peace and love, your friendly neighbourhood poppy information leech RectalCement over and out (not really im gonna be checking this thread every waking second)

#2 Skywatcher

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 06:01 PM

Hello arcee,

You have gotten some incorrect info right off. Poppies only live one season, so they will grow, flower, seed, and die in one growing season. Other than not taking kindly to transplant or root disturbing, they are really easy and not a very finicky plant. Persian white, tazmanian, danish flag, hens and chicks, and the purple/blues are all definitely good varieties, but they all work for tea as long as they are papaver somniferum.

 

I know nothing about how poppies will do hydroponically, but we have had quite a few members do well indoors under good strong lighting in potted environments. I use a good enriched soil that drains well. Seeds need to be sown on the surface, not buried, and kept warm and humid to sprout well. Once you have a few secondary leaves, they will begin to get hardier.

There are many good sources for seeds.........................

 

I'm sure you will get more people chime in......


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#3 pharmer

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 08:11 PM

Stop listening to the people you've been listening to. Damn, they couldn't have known less or been more wrong.

 

the good thing about growing under lights will be that you will always be giving them "growing" light as opposed to "fruiting" light. They do best under those conditions.

 

A downside to this is that the pods do best when they harden on the stem with warmth and light. This would have your hydro area unproductive for as long as it takes the seeds to ripen and the pods to harden.That said I'm sure you could get three crops a year out of any given lighted setup.

 

I'll take a guess that a ten by ten lighted area would produce less than 6 large pods per square foot. That's roughly 600 pods or 1800 per year. If you're growing for personal use and a medium to bad pain problem that might be enough.

 

my math may be wrong here. three large pods a day would add up to  365x3 or 1095 pods per year assuming every square foot produced 6 large pods. That's do-able.

 

but why hydro? why not grow in dirt?  MJ people do it all the time. I would think a bed six inches deep would be plenty for the roots.

 

seeding and germinating is simple.  put the seeds on top of the soil and water them. don't keep the soil wet all the time. they like water early in the growth stage but don't like being soaked all day every day. water and let the soil dry water and let the soil dry water and let the soil dry.......

 

consider growing gigantheums. they're the biggest pods on average. unless you're looking for some of those gorgeous eye candy types of poppy which almost always have smallish pods.

 

you could grow three plants in a 5 inch pot on your window sill starting today assuming you're not in the arctic circle or at the equator.


Edited by pharmer, 18 April 2018 - 08:20 PM.

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#4 RectalCement

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 08:36 PM

Stop listening to the people you've been listening to. Damn, they couldn't have known less or been more wrong.

 

the good thing about growing under lights will be that you will always be giving them "growing" light as opposed to "fruiting" light. They do best under those conditions.

 

A downside to this is that the pods do best when they harden on the stem with warmth and light. This would have your hydro area unproductive for as long as it takes the seeds to ripen and the pods to harden.That said I'm sure you could get three crops a year out of any given lighted setup.

 

I'll take a guess that a ten by ten lighted area would produce less than 6 large pods per square foot. That's roughly 600 pods or 1800 per year. If you're growing for personal use and a medium to bad pain problem that might be enough.

 

my math may be wrong here. three large pods a day would add up to  365x3 or 1095 pods per year assuming every square foot produced 6 large pods. That's do-able.

 

but why hydro? why not grow in dirt?  MJ people do it all the time. I would think a bed six inches deep would be plenty for the roots.

 

seeding and germinating is simple.  put the seeds on top of the soil and water them. don't keep the soil wet all the time. they like water early in the growth stage but don't like being soaked all day every day. water and let the soil dry water and let the soil dry water and let the soil dry.......

 

consider growing gigantheums. they're the biggest pods on average. unless you're looking for some of those gorgeous eye candy types of poppy which almost always have smallish pods.

 

you could grow three plants in a 5 inch pot on your window sill starting today assuming you're not in the arctic circle or at the equator.

Hydro, dirt, whatever works pretty much. Also I wanted like 12 or less plants, not anywhere near the industrial crop you're thinking of, but thanks for the math my dude. If soil with nutrients and either a water delivery system, like wick or ebb and flow, or just watering like a normal person would also work then all the better, because if just having some plants in a pot under a grow light or outside is all it takes to have a viable crop, then like growing poppies is easy? What soil types are suitable for poppies then? What nutrients or should I even worry? But if soil with however many plants under grow lights or outside is actually viable without any fans, or too much temp. and humidity control is viable then like what the hell. Also is peat mixed with sand and eggshells viable for both seedlings and flowers? How long would just a single harvest take from seed to flower? Also thank you so much.



#5 Skywatcher

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 09:09 PM

What soil types are suitable for poppies then? What nutrients or should I even worry? But if soil with however many plants under grow lights or outside is actually viable without any fans, or too much temp. and humidity control is viable then like what the hell. Also is peat mixed with sand and eggshells viable for both seedlings and flowers? 

 

Poppies will grow outside in all kinds of native soils.

IMO peat, sand, and egg shells really is not a great choice. You can germinate the seeds in the same soil and pot you are going to grow them in. I have done well and used containers. I would suggest a regular, good potting soil.

Easy and more nutritionally complete. As far as nutes, the ones I have grown outside did not need much, but in a container I have used an organic like kelp, or some other that was in the 7/7/7 range if I saw any signs that the plants were getting weak like they had depleted the fuel in the soil.



#6 RectalCement

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 09:40 PM

Oh wow thanks! So germinate a few seeds in a 6 inch deep pot with good draining soil, something sandy and loamy (like a little sand with just yard dirt and gravel maybe?), and keep moist but not drenched and let dry before watering again. Also only give them nutrients when it looks like they're dying because otherwise the potency or yield will decrease I think? Seedlings like to be warm (right?), but sprouts like to be cold at night and warm in the day with plenty of sunshine if I recall. But in general getting a few plants with a good yield shouldn't be too hard from seed?

 

Also I feel like this website is pretty much in line with what you're saying:

https://www.worldsee...oppies-indoors/


Edited by RectalCement, 18 April 2018 - 09:48 PM.

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#7 pharmer

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 10:07 PM

. But in general getting a few plants with a good yield shouldn't be too hard from seed?

 

As easy as most easy plants. Not too much wind and keep the cats and dogs away. I've never done it but have considered staking them when they get tall enough to flower.


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#8 RectalCement

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 12:54 PM

Yo so is it really just that simple? Aren't there like signs of nutrient deficiencies and soil pH that I need to look out for? Also what is the ideal temperature for poppies and also if I do end up using grow lights, or just sunlight, what would be the light schedule for them?

#9 coorsmikey

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 06:08 PM

Are you in an area that you cannot grow poppies outdoors? I’m pretty far north and throw seed out every spring and just watch the do their thing. It is that easy! Indoors under lights just seems to be a waste of energy for 12 pods. Unless you were already growing something else under the light like MJ for example. Perhaps the OP is just wanting to go indoors for the sak of learning and science, but a dozen pods will hardly have any medicinal value in comparison to the amount of energy consumption when a single 14” pot on a sunny porch will give you the same.
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Edited by coorsmikey, 19 April 2018 - 06:13 PM.


#10 MsBehavin420

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 06:45 PM

I got that crap butterfly seed mix from dollar tree or general had poppies. Threw them in crap soil and they worked. Minimal care. Of course some care would have been a little better but I had no time.
I want real ones as I want a permaculture yard. Which is what brought me here initially.

#11 RectalCement

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 08:43 PM

Oh wow, I could probably get a good tray or whatever, and I already have some peat moss clay laying around, there's a park down the street with sand and gravel, and also I have some Neptune's Harvest Fish Fertilizer if need be. I had some seeds in the fridge for close to a week, but really I should just plant the damn things and stop worrying, right?

 

Also I found some giganteum seeds from West Coats Seeds, anyone ever bought from there? Are there any other good sources that offer small (under ~800 seeds) shipments of P. Som seeds?


Edited by RectalCement, 19 April 2018 - 08:51 PM.


#12 coorsmikey

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 10:34 PM

The seed from the grocery store in the spice section or even online for baking are P. Somniferium. Yes the seed on bagels (which are no good cuz they were cooked) there is poppy seed all over, no need to pay the high prices for 100 seeds in a dime bag unless your gonna grow your own high quality seed for future large crops.

Edited by coorsmikey, 19 April 2018 - 11:57 PM.

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#13 RectalCement

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 10:38 PM

Damn thanks!




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