Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

supplementing raised beds


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 majormillet

majormillet

    Mycophiliac

  • VIP
  • 74 posts

Posted 15 October 2018 - 12:42 PM

Now that the seasons crops are harvested, were turning out attention to supplementing the soil in our raised beds.  I will be adding various soil amendments, such as kelp meal, azomite, a dash of elemental sulfur, some granular gypsum, maybe some alfalfa meal or chopped alfalfa hay.  Im not going to get carried away, as I use a full nutrient program (fox farms) during the growing season, as well as mycorhyzal application.

 

What amendments do you add?

 

Also, I wonder if I cant screen the ashes from my wood stove, and save the chunks of charcoal and add them as well.  Are these chunks of charcoal akin to bio-char, even though they are created by a different method?  I understand that I ought not add wood ash, as it will raise the soil ph if applied in large amounts.

 

best regards,

millet


  • coorsmikey likes this

#2 majormillet

majormillet

    Mycophiliac

  • VIP
  • 74 posts

Posted 15 October 2018 - 01:04 PM

I am also wondering if the beds would benefit from the addition of a product like hygrozyme to help break down the roots left behind in the soilless mix.

 

#3 PapMyc

PapMyc

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 71 posts

Posted 15 October 2018 - 06:49 PM

Have you ever done a soil test ? I wouldn't add anything until I knew what is missing or in excess. I do mine every fifth year so as to get maximum growth for the time I'm investing.

#4 majormillet

majormillet

    Mycophiliac

  • VIP
  • 74 posts

Posted 15 October 2018 - 07:51 PM

Hi there, I have taken soil samples in the past from grain fields and had them tested.  We used the test results to figure out how much fertilizer to add for the next crop.  I really had not considered having the soilless mix tested.  These particular beds at 6 x 18', and we grow 3 plants per.

 

I think you are right, its a good idea and will give a baseline to work up from.  Thanks for your recommendation, its much appreciated.  I notice peaceful valley garden supply offers a soilless mix test, ill order a kit from them (Its just a sample bag really, and some rudimentary instructions on how to collect samples) then send off a sample for testing.

 

Ill post results here when I get them and we can take it from there.

 

Thanks again!

 

best regards,

millet


  • coorsmikey likes this

#5 PapMyc

PapMyc

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 71 posts

Posted 16 October 2018 - 05:56 PM

Peaceful Valley is one of my go to companies for new gardeners. Good inexpensive products and organic seeds, and great customer service.

#6 PsyBearknot

PsyBearknot

    Psyche-Killa

  • App Administrator
  • 5,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 17 October 2018 - 06:27 AM

Why about a cover crop. Lots of organic and urban Gardner’s will do a winterr cover crop or make a new bed and grow a cover crop for a year
  • T0them00N likes this

#7 scott_1971_h

scott_1971_h

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 1,434 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 17 October 2018 - 08:40 AM

Comfrey. Seriously so useful you can never have enough. Deep deep roots 'mine' for nutrients and the leaves are pretty well compost as soon as they are cut. And anything growing close by seems to grow better by osmosis. It's not a 'neighbour strangler'.


  • PapMyc likes this

#8 PapMyc

PapMyc

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 71 posts

Posted 18 October 2018 - 01:16 PM

I don't think that comfrey in a grow bed would be good. But comfrey is a great herb for everyone. It's medicinal properties are good for lots of ailments. If we had a calf with scours a bottle or two of comfrey tea took care of the problem. Great cell building properties.

#9 majormillet

majormillet

    Mycophiliac

  • VIP
  • 74 posts

Posted 26 October 2018 - 10:06 PM

I got my sample bag and instructions from peaceful valley a few days ago.  I will try to get a good mixed sample in the next few days and get it mailed to them,  it takes 7-10 days for the test results to be emailed to me.

 

Ill post them up when I receive them.

 

I do not wish to spend the time and expense to run a cover crop.  I dont think theyd be warm enough or get enough lite to make it worth my time.  It will be snowing and coldcold in 3-4 weeks or so.  I figured I supplement the beds, and staple black plastic titely over top, after a good watering, and let them ruminate over the winter.  I am in a temperate continental climate.

 

best regards,

millet


Edited by majormillet, 26 October 2018 - 10:11 PM.


#10 T0them00N

T0them00N

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 112 posts

Posted 28 October 2018 - 01:59 AM

I'll be re amending with kelp, comfrey, malted barley(or an extract), and worm castings. Maybe some eggshells or some shellfish meal depending how I feel. As well as any compost I make and maybe some bought ones with beneficial insects in it (bu's blend or oly mtn). Also I'll toss some basalt or a quality glacial rock dust, plus a cover crop.

I don't think enzymes would be a bad thing to add but they're expensive and compost/vermicompost should have enzymes and microlife to work the stuff especially with malted barley and kelp jumpstarting them.

This year I will be adding in benificials as well for my to supplament my current IPM

And screened charcoal will work. if you charge it, it would help you out more. Soak it in an alfalfa tea then a compost tea and add in.
My preference would be hardwood

Aeriation is another thing I'll add in which I usually get from organic rice hulls as well as grains from a bulk or something that got composted.. lava rock or pumice

On a new bed the first year or two I would add in some fulvic and humic acids. A little goes a long way.

feeding regime other than top dressing with kelp and malted barley.
I'll use some knf fish amino acid and fermented plant juice or fermented fruit juice as foliar feeds with the leftovers going in the ground. I view these more as an amendment though and will add these to the beds before and after winterization to keep things alive and kicking.

Absolutely agree than a soil test is a good idea before going to crazy and would be worth the small fee
  • majormillet likes this

#11 PsyBearknot

PsyBearknot

    Psyche-Killa

  • App Administrator
  • 5,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 October 2018 - 03:47 PM

I don't think that comfrey in a grow bed would be good. But comfrey is a great herb for everyone. It's medicinal properties are good for lots of ailments. If we had a calf with scours a bottle or two of comfrey tea took care of the problem. Great cell building properties.


Why do you say no coMfrey in Grow beds?

#12 T0them00N

T0them00N

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 112 posts

Posted 28 October 2018 - 11:28 PM

I don't think that comfrey in a grow bed would be good. But comfrey is a great herb for everyone. It's medicinal properties are good for lots of ailments. If we had a calf with scours a bottle or two of comfrey tea took care of the problem. Great cell building properties.


Why do you say no coMfrey in Grow beds?

I think he's referring to planting actual rhizomes in the beds, like companion planting. I would agree as well but don't believe that was the intention of the advice that was given.. or a miscommunication. comfrey in the bed would be top dressing with the leaves either dry or shredded up fresh. This is the way I view it at least? I could be wrong? If I am wrong ×2 on why no comfrey?

#13 scott_1971_h

scott_1971_h

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 1,434 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2018 - 04:36 AM

Comfrey can be grown in the beds depending on what you grow with it. Comfrey is, at most, 18 inches high (usually 12) and most other plants are obviously taller than that. What are you planning to grow?

 

But even if not grown in the raised bed, you can plant it elsewhere and cut and dig into the raised bed. It is seriously, extremely useful.


Edited by scott_1971_h, 29 October 2018 - 04:41 AM.


#14 PapMyc

PapMyc

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 71 posts

Posted 29 October 2018 - 05:32 AM

If planting comfrey it will mine minerals due to it's long taproot and the leaves can be sheet composted.

The variety of comfrey I have grows about two foot tall and starts to fall over as the 30" flower stalk matures.

As mentioned it is a very worthwhile herb to have around either way.

And your right TTM I'm assuming this is for an outdoor grow and not for veggies.

#15 T0them00N

T0them00N

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 112 posts

Posted 29 October 2018 - 07:27 AM

Mine are not even 12 months old and already pushing 24" its bocking14 variety

#16 scott_1971_h

scott_1971_h

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 1,434 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2018 - 07:40 AM

If planting comfrey it will mine minerals due to it's long taproot and the leaves can be sheet composted.

The variety of comfrey I have grows about two foot tall and starts to fall over as the 30" flower stalk matures.

As mentioned it is a very worthwhile herb to have around either way.

And your right TTM I'm assuming this is for an outdoor grow and not for veggies.

I always cut mine early. They might be better around the base of trees (I had some under an apricot tree, did wonders for the soil) I think I had the russian... but I could be wrong lol. 



#17 scott_1971_h

scott_1971_h

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 1,434 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 October 2018 - 07:41 AM

Mine are not even 12 months old and already pushing 24" its bocking14 variety

Oh yes sorry mine was a bocking too.



#18 PapMyc

PapMyc

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 71 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 06:52 PM

Hey MajorMillet

Just curious what the results of your soil test were?

Edited by PapMyc, 18 November 2018 - 06:53 PM.


#19 majormillet

majormillet

    Mycophiliac

  • VIP
  • 74 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 09:22 PM

I havent gotten them back yet.  Will post when I get the results.


  • PapMyc likes this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!