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Eleusis!


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#1 PistolPete13

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Posted 25 February 2019 - 07:52 PM

I thought this would be safest place to post this, where some like minded imaginations might be sparked. (and without being called a nutcase :wacko: !)

quote-the-ultimate-design-of-the-mysteri

 

I have always been fascinated by the Eleusinian mysteries of ancient Greece, truth be told I have always been fascinated by ancient Greece in general. For example it was documented Plato was an initiate of the Eleusinian mysteries. Where they took some sort of entheogen(kykeon), and it is also believed that most of the ancient Greek mythology was allegorical. For example(to me), Plato's allegory of the cave could easily be interpreted as a description of using these entheogens.

https://en.wikipedia...ory_of_the_Cave

The most famous artifact from Eleusis is the Eleusis amphora, from around 650 B.C.(please have a close look at the images);

3-p54-medium.jpg Perseus-Eleusis-Amphora-1.jpg Gorgons.jpg

 

It is a depiction of Perseus cutting off Medusa's head while two other Gorgons(Medusa's sisters) watch on. It is a bit damaged, but you can clearly make out a human figure that is believed to be Athena and Perseus a bird and something else are damaged. The Gorgons are monsters but why are they so weird looking? The amphora was believed to be a tombstone of sorts but it contained the bones of a young boy.....
 

Below are some botanical drawings and photos of Peganum Harmala, note;

  • The similarity between the seeds and their dresses
  • As the pods ripen they split open
  • The white five petal flowers (some have six but looks like they went back tried to change it)
  • The fact that to harvest you have to cut off its head

s794094284479881721_p60_i5_w500.jpeg 800px-Peganum_harmala_MHNT.BOT.2015.34.29.jpg

 

On the neck of the amphora is this;

3-p55-medium.jpg

 

Which is a depiction of Polyphemos the cyclops who gets a spear in the eye from Odysseus and his cohorts after getting him drunk on strong undiluted wine.

250px-Peganum-harmala-fruit.jpg

p_harmala1.jpg

 

Polyphemos who was usually depicted in ancient Greece as below with his eye on his forehead, his name means in Greek = abounding in songs and legends

images.jpeg polyphemus.jpg

 

Now a painter from the same time period (protoattic), painted this about the same time. note;

  • The same motifs(like the five petal flower) are repeated on this amphora
  • Look under the horses and what I call the ergot men's feet

24387019.a633e279.640.jpg 24387021.b210ad5c.800.jpg 24387033.0c3a146c.800.jpg 24387051.a37e6ebf.800.jpg

 

The Spurlock Museum sold an artifact that was found at Eluesis it was dated 'High Classical, 3rd quarter of 5th century BCE' and is a figurine of Demeter(her dress was originally painted a light blue, some of it is still on there after all these years);

https://www.spurlock...?a=1959.01.0001

 

hero_1920.jpg 1959.01.0001.8.JPG 1959.01.0001.20.JPG 1959.01.0001.2.JPG

 

It is believed to be a votive offering, something that was somewhat mass-produced and cheap and meant to be left at the religious site as an offering. They say the back was cut out to help it dry, but i cannot help but think if you filled the goddess of grain' figurine with wet grain and a cap of a shroom the ones that did not contaminate would look pretty awesome when they fruited!

 

 

 

 

Eleusinian01.jpeg an-ergot-fungi-sclerotium-calviceps-purpurea-growing-on-infected-wild-grass-dorset-england-uk-gb-PA4GA6.jpg

 

 

Food for thought..............


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#2 DonShadow

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 07:35 PM

I have a few thoughts on this. Keep in mind I am not a scholar and this is largely speculative, so please take it with a hefty grain of salt.

 

Eleusis was predated by Orphism, the Anthesteria and other Dionysian Mysteries, all of which bear common features. Eleusis seems to have been a condensed or refined version of these previous festivals. I believe Mycenae was occupied by Indo-Europeans, who arrived in a Greece which was already populated by the Minoans, Etruscans and others. The founding myth of Mycenae begins with Perseus picking a mushroom and slaying a gorgon who resided under a World Tree. Carl Ruck's book "The Apples of Apollo" discusses these things at length.

 

Here is a vase depicting Perseus' slaying of the Gorgon. Notice the mushrooms above his head:

Greek Vase, with Perseus.jpg

 

And a Mycenaean vase with what looks like psilocybe mushrooms painted on it:

Virgo_det_Josef_Moroder.jpg

 

The mysteries all appear to metaphorically represent cycles of death, decay and rebirth. The life cycle of fungi is an obvious parallel, as is alchemy. When two disparate spores germinate, the hyphae produce pheromones and travel in search of a compatible mycelia. The marriage of Hades and Persephone alludes to the decay of plant matter (Persephone) by mycelium (Hades). This sacred marriage culminates in the birth of the "Divine Mystery Child" sometimes depicted as Plouton (wealth) or Triptolemus (who taught the Greeks about agriculture). Triptolemus' winged chariot seems to resemble the "wings" of ripe grain, and Triptolemus himself is the sclerotia of ergot protruding from within the wings. The "Divine Child" is often the personification of fungi, being the literal offspring born of dead plant matter and the mycelial underworld.

d12f670d4a150a762167944cc3de8adb.jpg

 

The "Keres" of the Anthesteria (Maenads of Orphism and Eleusis) are the frenzied ancestral feminine spirits of the dead, which return at the end of winter when repression can no longer be kept at bay. Festivals like this permitted repressed emotion (sexual and otherwise) to emerge in a somewhat controlled fashion, and the consumption of fungal metabolites (alcohol, psilocybin, ergot derivatives, muscimol and who knows what else) initiated the decomposition of the egoic boundaries built up during the profane time of winter frugality.

 

The word "Anthesteria" seems (at least to me) to be derived from the prefix ant- (opposed to, against) and Greek hysterikos- (of the womb, or suffering in the womb). Basically what this means is that spring festivals helped to foster connection with the feminine principle, encourage healthy sexual activity and dissolve unnecessary egoic boundaries that might prevent people from cooperating and thus "stifle" the womb of mother Earth. Mystery festivals "clear out the pipes" of the world soul.

 

In the Orphic cosmology, which I would call an "indigenous" cosmology (indigenous meaning "sprung from the earth"), the universe was born from the Orphic cosmic egg, which emerged from the womb of Nyx, the goddess of night. This is like the seed or spore that germinates in the soil, or even the big bang that burst from the dark vacuum of space.

cosmology.jpg


Edited by DonShadow, 28 February 2019 - 12:42 AM.

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#3 PistolPete13

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Posted 27 February 2019 - 11:08 PM

You rock Don! I love this stuff, thanks for sharing.

 

 

Keep in mind I am not a scholar and this is largely speculative, so please take it with a hefty grain of salt.

 

Maybe I should have put that before my post also :blush:

 

I need to read Apples of Apollo!

 

Your description above fits in nicely with the depiction of Mithras killing the sacrificial bull, from the Mystery religion in Rome(complete with liberty cap as his back leg);

supp_Marino-il-Mitreo.jpg

I would also like to find some evidence of what was being used, Syrian Rue was well known to the ancient Greeks and could have been used as an ayahausca analog. Or they could also theoretically potentiate some of the water soluble ergot alkaloids Ruck and Hofmann suggested may have been used at Eleusis?


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#4 DonShadow

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 12:28 AM

thanks for sharing.

 

My pleasure dude. I share because I think that secrecy is the cause of terrible violence, and people who sequester information in order to write big fancy books are often only in it for fame and/or money. Language is an enzymatic process, a tool for solving problems and breaking down barriers, not for creating them.

 

MAOI containing plants change the game in a big way, since they render so many otherwise innocuous substances poisonous or psychoactive. I don't know anything about the use of P. Harmala in the ancient world, but I suspect it was thoroughly exploited.

 

I forgot to mention that Plato (or was it Pythagoras?) spoke of philosophy as being an "anamnesis", or a process of remembering. Both Plato and Pythagoras were likely Orphic initiates, and the Orphics were encouraged to drink from the river of the goddess Mnemosyne (memory), which would free them from the cycle of reincarnation. Here is Mnemosyne offering an initiate a bowl of water from her river:

Portrait-Of-Mnemosyne-TB411.gif

 

Hmm, I wonder what was in that water? Orpheus means "orphan", or, one separated from one's parents. A mushroom is often depicted as being "born of a virgin" or by some other miraculous means (lightning strikes, droplets of blood etc).

 

It has been shown that Psilocybin induces hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. It is also known that hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to allocentric memory (metaphorical/mythic memory, as opposed to egocentric memory, which refers to literal or autobiographical material). Psilocybin also reduced conditioned fear in the rodent subjects.

 

-Psilocybin study on mice: https://www.ncbi.nlm...ubmed/23727882/

 

-Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity and memory: facts and hypotheses: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17593874/

 

This is more than enough to paint the big picture for me. Psilocybin (or Psilocin, technically) is an exogenous neurotransmitter which aids in the restoration of the enduring, eternal memory of all biological life. Its absence creates the illusion of duality, of separation from the divine eternal whole. The oral tradition, the creation of myths and symbols and the ritualized passing of knowledge from elders to youth is integral to the health of a civilization. It is the chain that binds people together through time.


Edited by DonShadow, 28 February 2019 - 12:55 AM.

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#5 PistolPete13

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 12:57 AM

 

This is more than enough to paint the big picture for me. Psilocybin is an exogenous neurotransmitter which aids in the restoration of the enduring, eternal memory of all biological life. Its absence creates the illusion of duality, of separation from the divine eternal whole. The oral tradition, the creation of myths and symbols and the ritualized passing of knowledge from elders to youth is integral to the health of a civilization. It is the chain that binds people together through time.

 

Well said!

 

I am not sure if it the same where you are but regarding psilocybin;

https://www.sbs.com....bourne-hospital

 

As the link suggests they are literally giving dying patients psilocybin at hospitals here, to help them overcome the anxiety and fear of dying(and it works!!). So when things like this start coming to light also, it makes me think psilocybin is more likely than Amanita's in a lot of cases also, regarding immortality, euphoria ect.

 

Also I would have to point out in Norse mythology Odin and his famous encounter with Mimir at his well where Odin is required to put one of his eyes in the well before he can take a drink and receive the wisdom. The well is located below the world tree.

 

 

Also the amphora above I linked shows a depiction of Heracles about to kill the centaur Nessos;

post-157057-0-09817500-1551140676_thumb.post-157057-0-43555400-1551140612_thumb.

 

Which also has mushrooms present.

 

Here is another ancient Greek amphora depicting the same scene and below the ever familiar Perseus beheading Medusa;

6-p64-medium.jpg

Very similar to Mithra scene above(in fact with everything that has been discussed).

 

Would love to know what the motifs like this represent(if anything)'

Eleusis amphora;

m1.jpg

Second Amphora

n1.jpg

 

m2.jpg


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#6 DonShadow

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 01:20 AM

That's amazing to hear, regarding the end of life trails in Australia. I caught wind of that a couple of days ago but I didn't realize it was already underway. That's absolutely fantastic, what a progressive and intelligent move on the part of the Australian government to approve such a trial.

 

I have read most of Clark Heinrich's book "Magic Mushrooms in Religion and Alchemy", and in it he describes his own experiences with Amanita Muscaria in great detail. He claims that it requires a fair bit of diligence and practice to realize the whole range of potential effects, which he says can be every bit as amazing as is described in the Vedic literature.  I haven't tried it myself, but given that it is well-known to be used to this day by many indigenous peoples in the old and new world, it must have some value that requires dedication to understand. Heinrich's book also suggests that the "slaying of the bull" motif in Mithraism and Zoroastrianism may have began with the Vedic tradition of preparing the Amanita mushroom, which was sometimes referred to as the "bull" due to its propensity for plowing up through the earth like the horn of a bull. I have a good stash of Amanita var. Flavivolvata which I plan to imbibe soon.

 

I wonder if you could specify where you see mushrooms in the amphora you pointed out? Also I'm not sure which scene you've referred to which allegedly illustrates Perseus and the gorgon?


Edited by DonShadow, 28 February 2019 - 01:21 AM.


#7 PistolPete13

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:00 AM

I am assuming they are mushrooms (they are mushroom like), under the foot of the first character. Second picture under the centaurs back legs. third pic under Ares horses feet. (correct me if I wrong but they looked like mushrooms?).

24387033.0c3a146c.800.jpg
24387051.a37e6ebf.800.jpg
24387021.b210ad5c.800.jpg
24387019.a633e279.640.jpg

Edited by PistolPete13, 28 February 2019 - 02:01 AM.


#8 DonShadow

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:08 AM

I see those as cranes, but they could have a hidden double-meaning. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

#9 PistolPete13

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 02:25 AM

Haha, touche! You are correct there, I must have got so excited when I saw them I did not even notice :blush:  I went and got a higher definition picture and they are definitely more crane like than mushroom like....



#10 PistolPete13

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 07:30 PM

You have to let me digest some of this stuff, a lot is new to me. Very interesting stuff regarding Amanitas, from the first hand reports of friends and my own experiences I had pretty much written it off. But you are quite right about its continued use ect, just something that sprung to mind after reading about the bulls horns coming up from the ground;

 

 

Odin asked for a drink and Mimir replied that Odin must sacrifice an eye for a drink. ... Odin sacrificed an eye, but gained a more sacred, divine level of wisdom in return. This happens multiple times in Norse mythology, as Odin sacrifices his physical body to gain a cosmic understanding of reality.

 

It has a flesh of the gods ring to it;

TW_PsiloGerm02_575-1.jpg

A: Azurescens            B: Cyanescens                C: Germanica

 

 

Of what wouldst thou ask me? Why temptest thou me? Odin! I know all, where thou thine eye didst sink in the pure well of Mim." Mim drinks mead each morn from Valfather's pledge.

 

She knows that Heimdall's horn is hidden under the heaven-bright holy tree. A river she sees flow, with foamy fall, from Valfather's pledge. Understand ye yet, or what?

https://en.wikipedia...iki/MĂ­misbrunnr

 

The second stanza I quoted sounded more Amanita like horn found under a tree (as Soma was meant to be juiced?). Also Thor the god of thunder and lightning has been suggested by some to have some mushroom connotations.

 

Sorry for being so random, it just came to mind.


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#11 DonShadow

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 02:31 AM

You've reminded me that I would like to read more Norse mythology. Greek myth seems to resonate with me most strongly, so it has been my primary focus, but I ought to diversify. I live on the west coast of Canada so I feel a certain responsibility to observe the myths of the local indigenous peoples here. It is astounding how closely they parallel Greek myths. We really are all one big family, sadly divided by our inherited amnesia. I think this is rapidly changing though. Actually, I know it's changing.

 

I want to clarify what I said about secrecy being the cause of violence. I thought about this very deeply afterward, and I felt ashamed for saying it, though I do believe what I said. Surely it could just as easily be said that violence is the cause of secrecy; it is obviously a tug-of-war. What I intended to convey is that it is important to share information and help others learn. When information is withheld and we neglect to educate others, we create boundaries and divisions that can only be overcome violently. I believe that we are much stronger when we learn together, rather than placing emphasis on heroism and individual accomplishments. I for one do not wish to be a hero or a prophet. I would much prefer to be like a beating heart that allows information and kindness to flow freely.

 

Also, I accidentally quoted Carl Ruck as the sole author of "The Apples of Apollo", when it was in fact a collaboration between he, Blaise Daniel Staples and Clark Heinrich. I apologize for this misattribution.


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#12 PistolPete13

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 03:28 AM

Yes you should, I have been into Norse mythology for sometime. As it is apparently is the closest to the Pagan religions my ancestors most probably practiced. Although it did not seem to help the vikings when the Algonquins were showing them who was boss. I am from Australia which obviously has an indigenous population so I guess I feel a similar way, as they really have one the most ignored religions. I am not sure if you are familiar with the Dreamtime for example? Or the rainbow serpent (who sounds a lot like Quetzalcoatl).

 

I understand what you meant, I agree completely but it is just unfortunate that there are financial motivations for secrecy (and not just on the part of the humble researcher) more so the governments ect that profit greatly by keeping knowledge under lock and key and selling only to the highest bidders like Ivy League Colleges for example and keeping it out of the hands of everyone else.

 

I have some more thoughts to follow.

e975b84d4ebf1f99e70df1ee23c3940f.jpg

Terracotta Relief of Persephone (daughter of Zeus and Demeter; made queen of the underworld by Pluto in ancient Greek mythology) Seated on a Throne Receiving Dionysus.

 

Because I am seeing mushrooms everywhere at the moment, just saw this as possible Amanita's drying.



#13 PistolPete13

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 04:56 PM

Here is something to think about!

 

The Spurlock museum featured the Demeter figurine on their blog;

 

 

This figurine was originally brightly painted, as seen from traces of blue on the front of her draped clothes, as well as traces of red paint on her lips.

hero_1920.jpg

1959.01.0001.13.JPG

https://www.spurlock...ject-demeter/51

 

 

After reading the Homeric Hymn to Demeter again, if someone was going to go to the trouble of painting the lips red. Surely it would be Persephone's who had famously just eaten the Pomegranate in the Underworld?

 

Demeter(grain) grows spring through summer, then in late summer dies(it is immortal so is reborn). In fall the Thesmophoria was celebrated, which they celebrated the ascent(coming up from the underworld) of Persephone as they were(sowing the seeds for next spring) putting Demeter in the underworld....??

https://en.wikipedia...ki/Thesmophoria

 

What if this was a creation myth(like aboriginal creation myths) of a time before, then explaining how the current situation came about. Like the myth of how the crow became black.

 

For example say originally Demeter and Persephone were together all the time, then Hades came along in his golden chariot(extra sun in spring and summer) and took away Persephone(Semilanceata). Demeter(grain) is harvested in late summer(at the end of its life cycle so is an old lady) and comes to rest at the well in Eleusis after being harvested, and is processed and stored until Autumn and planted in the underworld at Thesmophoria as Persephone(Semilanceata) is ascending coming up(missing each other!).Persephone was destined to spend 1/3 of year underworld(it would be half; autumn, winter under and spring, summer up for grain).

 

The ritual performed at the mysteries? Maybe reuniting Grain(Demeter) and Semilanceatea(Persephone), in which they embrace and Demeter ensures a bumper harvest!

 

I suggest that it may be possible using Pennyroyal(Mentha Pulegium) as an antibiotic, and feeding ambrosia and burning away the mortality of the child could be a way to prepare a sterile mushroom culture? By mixing just enough water, Pennyroyal and Barley covering the pot and bringing to the boil and draining the excess water and cooling with lid on, then flame sterilizing a mushroom cap and dropping it into the grain.

 

Antifungal activity of essential oils against mycelial growth of Lecanicillium fungicola var. fungicola and Agaricus bisporus

 

hhhh.jpg

The selectivity of EOs is presented in Table 4. However, S.hortensis and Z. multiflora with 0.48 and 0.57 selectivity indices, respectively acted more selectively in comparison to other EOs  and their fungitoxicity was less to the mushroom than the myco-pathogen mycelium.

Attached File  mehrparvar2016.pdf   936.43KB   29 downloads

 

You can see above that it can hold back verticullium and still let the bisporus mycelium grow, I have a lot of other papers documenting its anti-microbial properties. But that one shows that it has some selectivity towards pathogens over mushroom mycelium.

 

***********************************************************************************************************************************************************

 

Here is an excerpt from a literal translation of the Westcar papyrus a nearly 4000 year old ancient Egyption artifact;

 

These gods then went out, having delivered Ruddjedet of the three children, and they said: 'Rejoice, Reusre, for three children have been born to you!'
Then he said to them: 'My ladies, what can I do for you? Please give this barley to your bearer, and accept it as a tip.' Then Khnum loaded himself with the barley, and they proceeded to where they had come from.
Then Isis said to these gods: 'What is it that we have come for, if not to perform a wonder for these children that may report to their father who let us come?'
Then they created three lordly crowns (l.p.h.!), and they put them in the barley.
Then they made the sky turn into storm and rain, and they returned to the house. They said: 'Please put the barley here in a sealed room, until we return from making music in the north.' And they put the barley in a sealed room.
Then Ruddjedet became pure in a purification of fourteen days.
Then she said to her maid: 'Has the house been prepared?'And she said: 'It has been prepared with every good thing except for the jars; they haven't been brought.'
Then Ruddjedet said: 'But why haven't the jars been brought?' And the maid said: 'There is nothing for contents here, except for the barley of these musicians, which is in a room under their seal.' Then Ruddjedet said: 'Go down and fetch it from there, and Reusre will give them compensation for it after he returns.' And the maid went and opened the room. Then she heard the noise of singing, music making, dancing, cheering and everything that is done for a king, in the room. Then she went and recounted everything she had heard to Ruddjedet.
Then she went through the room, but couldn't find the place where it was done. Then she put her ear to the sack, and found it was being done in it. Then she put(it) in a box, which was put in another chest, bound with leather. She put it in a room containing her belongings, and locked it up.
Then Reusre returned, coming from the land, and Ruddjedet recounted this matter to him, and he was exceedingly happy. Then they sat down for a day of celebration.

 

https://en.wikipedia...Westcar_Papyrus

Translation used;

 

The story makes more sense if you read it whole and not just this little snippet......

 



#14 PJammer24

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 05:06 PM

What does Plato know?? He may not even have existed! His philosophies and writing didn't really appear until 1300 years after his death... There is even more speculation that Socrates, his supposed teacher, was not a real person... Socrates didn't write anything down? I find it hard to believe that a philosopher wasn't writing down his philosophies... 

 

Unfortunately I was not a fly on the wall in Classical Athens, though that would have been pretty F'n sweet, but I wouldn't be surprised if some or all of what is attributed to these two figures is a conglomeration of the ideas of many men...

 

I saw "Plato" and went on a mini-rant... I am at work and did not really read the thread... *sorry*


Edited by PJammer24, 05 March 2019 - 05:07 PM.


#15 PistolPete13

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 05:20 PM

That is a good point, there is even enough speculation as to whether Shakespear was real or just a collection of writers(even female ones, who would not have been accepted at the time).

 

As to Socrates I have even read the speculation that any great philosophical idea was just credited to Socrates like you would a god.

 

 

Unfortunately I was not a fly on the wall in Classical Athens, though that would have been pretty F'n sweet, but I wouldn't be surprised if some or all of what is attributed to these two figures is a conglomeration of the ideas of many men...

 

It is also a favorite pastime of mine to get really high, and speculate about these matters......

 

 

I saw "Plato" and went on a mini-rant... I am at work and did not really read the thread... *sorry*

 

All good! I am just throwing ideas out for Don to shoot down anyway(academic clay pigeons), hopefully we end up coming across something of substance.



#16 PistolPete13

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 12:00 AM

Just about to order a bag of pennyroyal, I wish I had some now.

 

 

Would be nice if @Ferather saw this, he has done a lot of work using tea as an antibiotic.......






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