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Subb hunt, tips?


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#1 Dimitri2teachme

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Posted 07 April 2019 - 11:28 AM

So I'm going on a subb hunt. I know they usually fruit around 80-86°, however I have a friend who brought me several pan foes asking me to ID them. So 70 degrees must be doing the trick.
I have stumbled upon them on girlfriends, grandparents, parents, and friends lawns. However i have read that they stop popping up on these lawns after a while. I plan to visit a few parks where i know the grass is taken care of. I will also visit a few hay fields and horse trails at my local nature reserve. Any other good ideas where the little guys could be hiding?
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#2 RutgerHauer

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 06:37 AM

Stamets gives this tip: go to a horse stable, look in the fields under trees where horses would stand to get some shade and take a dump. He says that that's where they like to grow.

#3 mjshroomer

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 12:52 PM

Rotted haystacks are the primary habitat for Panaeolus subbalteatus renamed as Panaeolus cinctulus.  They also on occasions can be found in manure.  The hose shit is a myth as shrooms can be grown directly in cow manure,. but those in horseshit are shrooms that grow in horse shit mixed with compost and stable shavings.  Then you would find them in giant compost heaps at racetracks and riding stables or where hay has been left out all winter with tarps to produce compost.  Some farmers or horse stable locations also add crushed  hickory shells to such compost heaps. Since I do not know how to add photos to this reply mode and I only know how to add photos when I make a new thread, so sorry I cannot put pictures here.

 

As far as lawns habitats. Joshua found a lawn in Oregon years ago that produced for a week or two.They do not return the following year in lawns. And that is rare in lawns.

 

Also in cow manure Panaeolus subbalteatus is common on occasion.Not every field has that species in it in manure.  Very rare.  Mitchnast of the Shroomery had a field that produced every year in Sydney Nova Scotia, Canada.  Lizard King of the Shroomery also had a field in Georgia that produced each year. I had three fields in Hawaii.  Two on Maui at the 3200 meter elevation on Kula Highway at Poli Poli Road, and a 2nd one there up Poli Poli road a quarter of a mile off Kula Highway on Maui.  However, that large one at the intersection was Hawaiian Land Home Property that was to be lotted out as homes to Hawaiians but I have not been there since 1994.  I had one place up on Kualoa Ranch property where I found two cow pies with specimens. They were sent to Guzman and he confirmed their identity and those are described in my published paper on Species ID in the Hawaiian Islands and in my book, Magic Mushrooms of Hawaii.  

 

There are massive haystacks in Oregon along Highway 99 West between Corvallis and Eugene, Oregon on the old Corvallis airport Runways.

 

Dosage for Panaeolus subbalteatus is the same as that for P. cubensis.  One fresh ounce or 3-5 dried grams.  This mushroom breaks apart very easily so care should be taken when harvesting them. Place in a shoe box or cardboard carton box all the same way and gently carry the box like a cup of hot coffee not disturbing or bouncing around the mushrooms when walking through a field..  Be good to those specimens you find and do not let them break apart in a collection box..

 

In Amsterdam, these were a popular grown species for a while producing 20,000 kilos a month of this species..


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#4 Dimitri2teachme

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 03:43 PM

Rotted haystacks are the primary habitat for Panaeolus subbalteatus renamed as Panaeolus cinctulus. They also on occasions can be found in manure. The hose shit is a myth as shrooms can be grown directly in cow manure,. but those in horseshit are shrooms that grow in horse shit mixed with compost and stable shavings. Then you would find them in giant compost heaps at racetracks and riding stables or where hay has been left out all winter with tarps to produce compost. Some farmers or horse stable locations also add crushed hickory shells to such compost heaps. Since I do not know how to add photos to this reply mode and I only know how to add photos when I make a new thread, so sorry I cannot put pictures here.

As far as lawns habitats. Joshua found a lawn in Oregon years ago that produced for a week or two.They do not return the following year in lawns. And that is rare in lawns.

Also in cow manure Panaeolus subbalteatus is common on occasion.Not every field has that species in it in manure. Very rare. Mitchnast of the Shroomery had a field that produced every year in Sydney Nova Scotia, Canada. Lizard King of the Shroomery also had a field in Georgia that produced each year. I had three fields in Hawaii. Two on Maui at the 3200 meter elevation on Kula Highway at Poli Poli Road, and a 2nd one there up Poli Poli road a quarter of a mile off Kula Highway on Maui. However, that large one at the intersection was Hawaiian Land Home Property that was to be lotted out as homes to Hawaiians but I have not been there since 1994. I had one place up on Kualoa Ranch property where I found two cow pies with specimens. They were sent to Guzman and he confirmed their identity and those are described in my published paper on Species ID in the Hawaiian Islands and in my book, Magic Mushrooms of Hawaii.

There are massive haystacks in Oregon along Highway 99 West between Corvallis and Eugene, Oregon on the old Corvallis airport Runways.

Dosage for Panaeolus subbalteatus is the same as that for P. cubensis. One fresh ounce or 3-5 dried grams. This mushroom breaks apart very easily so care should be taken when harvesting them. Place in a shoe box or cardboard carton box all the same way and gently carry the box like a cup of hot coffee not disturbing or bouncing around the mushrooms when walking through a field.. Be good to those specimens you find and do not let them break apart in a collection box..

In Amsterdam, these were a popular grown species for a while producing 20,000 kilos a month of this species..

Wow!!!! They used to pop up in my own back yard, every year. I think its because we fertilized so much?? However I do not live there anymore and I cannot go back... I may be able to snatch one or two quickly and take a print. Whether I find them there or in a field, I will take a print. I would attempt to clone them, and move them outside as they pop up here constantly (until i specifically go looking!!). Originally I was just looking for ideas on places to search where I won't get arrested for trespassing. But while we are on the subject, do you have any advice or a tek to point me to? So I can learn to take care of an outdoor patch of subbalteatus when I find one worthy to clone? It would be pure joy learning how to grow a native mushroom. Subbalteatus produce the best effect, I think they know we are a part of the same community haha.

Just so whoever sees the thread knows, I live in the Midwest, so we go through every season, and they cycle harshly where I am. However I have seen that this does not stop them from appearing through spring/summer. I do not know how they could survive a winter.

Edited by Dimitri2teachme, 09 April 2019 - 03:49 PM.


#5 Dimitri2teachme

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 03:58 PM

I have found a huge batch of what i believe are pan subbalteatus. I have some printing now. But what do you think by the looks of them? Growing on fertilized lawn under a tree.

The majority have a band around the cap.

Convex with black gills in maturity.

Bell shaped with lightly black gills in youth.

Hollow stem, lines going up and down the stem.


(Edit)£
The gills leave almost an ink like substance when I rub a cap apart. I assume these are spores, But as I said i am taking prints to be sure.

Looked into mica cap mushrooms, I see the mica caps are normally bell shaped into maturity, and the gills liquify.

I have found two patches today, one half sun dried subbalteatus, dried now, and tested with erlich for extra confirmation. One inky cap patch that fooled me and liquified while trying to dry. Good thing I separated the boxes i put each patch in. This inky cap batch only turns black in erlich. No tinges of purple to be found.

The image of the dry mushrooms are confirmed active with erlich. The others I threw away upon attempting to dry as they did the opposite of dry and became black paint.

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Edited by Dimitri2teachme, 17 April 2019 - 09:48 PM.


#6 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 01:44 AM

I have found a huge batch of what i believe are pan subbalteatus. I have some printing now. But what do you think by the looks of them? Growing on fertilized lawn under a tree.

 

 

Those are Coprinellus micaceus.


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