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differences between cube strains?


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#1 joeya

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 09:22 PM

I'm into my first grow in about 30 years, it's amazing how many strains there are now. Way back, we had pans or cubes. And, most of the pans we did were acquired in fields after it rained. 

 

Anyway, I did a lot of reading up front and learned that the ideal cube strains for noobs are B+ or Golden Teacher, so I bought a syringe of of the GT and shot up 10 jars a week ago. All but one are showing growth, so I'm off on the right foot. 

 

My question is, given that there are so many strains of cube, why are some (such as Penis Envy) reputed to be to difficult for noobs? Are they more sensitive to certain conditions? If so, what? Are they not as forgiving for PF TEK culture? PE are supposedly more potent than GT, so I would really like to get a grow of them started soon, but want to know what challenges I'm facing with that, any suggestions are welcome, as well as any other info on tougher strains. 

 

Thank you all!


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#2 Myc

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 05:41 PM

I'll take a stab at trying to answer your question.

 

Re: differences between strains

 

Ever looked into cannabis and the endless variety of strains? Most people can relate to this as many of us have sampled pot for a long time. Each strain is distinctively different - no question.

The same can be said of cubensis.

 

So what makes either of these items different?

In cannabis, it is the terpene and cannabanoid profile. Change any of the ratios - as happens from plant to plant - and you have variation of effect. 

With fungi - it is the presence of psilocin, psilocybin, baeocystin, and possibly other players which remain yet unidentified. I can say with absolute certainty that there is a distinct difference in experience when comparing the same dosage of dried mushrooms versus the same mushrooms consumed while fresh. The fresh fungi have something more - which seems to be destroyed by the drying process. 

A similar thing could be said about cannabis - whether eaten, vaporized, or smoked, the experiences from each method produce distinctively different effects. 

When, or at what point, you choose to harvest either of the aforementioned also makes a difference. Just like apples, tomatoes, or any other berry or herb - all things have their peak of readiness. 

 

If you really want to get down to the tiny details a study in biochemistry and organic chemistry is well worth your time. There really are no simple - in a nutshell - answers to your query as you will quickly find.


Edited by Myc, 10 April 2019 - 05:45 PM.

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#3 joeya

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 06:33 PM

Thank you Myc, 

I like the comparison with cannabis, which is much more universally understood. 

 

Although your points are well made, and informative, the question I intended to ask was what aspects of growing these strains makes one more difficult than another? Back to your cannabis correlation, some weed strains need more nutes than others, some need lower pH than others, and those variations from conventional patters are well described and documented. I'm wondering if the same concepts can be applied to shrooms?



#4 Myc

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 07:16 PM

I might not be the best resource for that type of information. While I have raised several sub-strains of cubensis, I found that they all pretty much behaved the same. Let's just say that everything I raised responded to the same care and technique - when I grew indoors. 

 

When I switched to outdoor grows - the effort went to spawn-raising, bed preparation, watering and waiting. Other than spawn production, there are no other aseptic processes. Everything is done outdoors, open-air, with suitably aged manure. But to re-iterate, I treated B+ just the same as Chitwan or Ban Hau Thanon or Thai Pink Buffalo ......etc. And they all produce prolifically outdoors if you time your seasonal temperatures correctly. 

 

The longer I live, the more I realize that we (people in general) tend to over-complicate things (or at least some of us). ;)


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#5 RutgerHauer

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 04:18 AM

Who is a strainist? I have heard about strains that like warmer temperatures and have difficulties fruiting in lower temps. Not sure, but I am saving those strains for warmer days.
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#6 Myc

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 08:46 AM

Who is a strainist? I have heard about strains that like warmer temperatures and have difficulties fruiting in lower temps. Not sure, but I am saving those strains for warmer days.

 

I've been around here for over a decade now and have seen more arguments than I care to recount. LOL

People get so involved over arguing the minutia that sometimes it seems more of an ego contest than a journey of personal, spiritual exploration. 

 

"Cold" fruiting strains like Captain Max's - "Ps. cubensis var. Oh Canada" - What an EPIC, gigantic ego show that one was. LOL ( Just one example of what I'm talking about. )

 

There have been so many penis comparing contests around here that one day, I just decided to leave it to the new guys. Now, I just grow what likes to grow where I grow. It takes a lot of practice and failure to find that out. Once you find something that works - don't "fix" it. 

Observe and emulate nature. 'Trip like I do.' 


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#7 snake

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 12:24 PM

Joeya,

Myc did an excellent explanation of strain differences.Makes me want to do a fresh one now.
If I may add something to the best-strain-for -newbs discussion, I have been pleasantly surprised with PE6, it is a very aggressive colonizer and ouick fruiter. The size are average but consistent with minimal amount of aborts.
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#8 LegoMyego

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 06:07 PM

I can attest to PE being much more potent.  I just got done with an APE grow and these suckers are much more powerful than other cubes I have tried.  2gs had me blasted, most intense trips of my life.  Beautiful visuals, heavy body load.  


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