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#1 Harlow

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 01:59 PM

So, what if we are looking at trees and plants upside down?  Or, maybe we should be looking at them upside down sometimes.  I think because people see what is above ground, they mostly focus on that, I get it but hear me out.  What if the roots are the true heart and life of the tree, at least in more of a spiritual sense, and we need to look upside down at how the tree really is.

 

What if the roots are the true center of life, and the branches and leaves are the 'roots' as we think of them now.  Instead of roots reaching out to gather nutrients and water, think of the leaves and branches as roots reaching out to gather sun and carbon dioxide.  The parts above ground are obviously required for the life of the tree and are a part of the living body of the tree, but it is the roots underground which are connected to everything in a way we cannot see, and may be the center of life which we cannot see.

 

Baby trees start growing roots first, then grow out into the open air later on.  Trees shed their leaves in fall and pull their sap back to their roots, even evergreens pull their sap back to their roots.

 

Just a random thought.


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#2 Alder Logs

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 05:02 PM

What I like to think about is that the bark is inside out, and the oldest bark on the tree is on the outside, unlike the wood, where the oldest is in the center.  We have nearly one hundred year old spruce, hemlock, cedar, and fir trees here on this property and that outside-most bark has seen nearly a century pass by.  Well, maybe not the Sitka spruce, as it sheds its outer bark in big flakes. 

 

Here's a Douglas fir I can see on the hillside across the valley from a window in this room.  It is 23 feet around at chest height.  I am posed with it here about five years ago.  I would guess this tree is over five hundred years old.  It is on a nearly vertical slope, which is probably why it's still there, as it is timber company land.

 

gallery_131808_1351_5982.jpg


Edited by Alder Logs, 13 May 2019 - 05:11 PM.

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#3 onediadem

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 09:19 PM

I like to look at trees as bodies. The inside is underground and lungs above. Doesn't matter which way you look at them, the are living beings that communicate and live just like you and me. Fun concept either way tho.


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#4 Skywatcher

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 08:50 AM

So, what if we are looking at trees and plants upside down?  Or, maybe we should be looking at them upside down sometimes.  I think because people see what is above ground, they mostly focus on that,

I think this perspective is much closer to the truth. It at least suggests opening up to non-traditional ways to see.  :smile:

When I "see" a tree, I think of "As above, so below". It's my opinion that all parts of the tree are as what we think of as "organs". The leaves breathe, but so do the roots. The roots are perhaps more like the trees mouth, to feed, but not exclusively. The upper branches and leaves feed on the sunlight and the rain. The bark is as skin, sensitive to touch. They may not react as rapidly (to anything) as we do, but they most definitely feel and can feel the differences between appreciation, love and enjoyment, fear and malice.

 

Where the "heart" of consciousness dwells I can't say. It feels more like a whole entity to me, but it could as easily be in the core, protected by the layers of growth.

 

If you place your hand on any part of the tree with quiet appreciation and love, the tree will "know" you, and because they constantly talk with all their friends, so will the trees surrounding. If you can slow yourself to their pace, they may "speak" to you...


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#5 Myc

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 09:12 AM

I liked Alder's observations also.

If you think about it the tree expands from someplace between the center and the outside - in regards to girth.

Then, the same is also true of the tree's height/depth. The plant material at ground level never grows "up" - it just expands and gets larger in diameter. Again - that odd expansion observation. 

 

So when looking at a tree:

The heart and the exterior bark are the oldest parts - in regards to girth.

The ground-level material (midway between the highest branches and the deepest roots) is the oldest. The material farther away from center is the newest. 

Interesting relationship. 

 

I'm glad I visited this topic. Thanks for the thought exercise. 


Edited by Myc, 14 May 2019 - 09:14 AM.

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#6 Harlow

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 11:24 AM

I really wasn't sure if I would get responses, or people would just read this and think I was a bit off the deep end.  Reading through all these amazing comments, you opened my mind so much more.  Thank you all.  Lately I have been thinking more about trying to be conscious of plants and trees.  I try to avoid hurting or damaging any living plant, when walking I purposely avoid stepping on living plants and intentionally walk around them...but I have never really interacted with them.  I live in a climate where it is not green everywhere, I can go to higher elevations and there is more but "lower" elevations have a good amount of bare ground; so I can avoid stepping on stuff most the time.  Reading what you all said, and especially Skywatcher's explanation, you all really made me realize so much more.  They really are living and breathing, part of life and living energy as we all are.  Maybe it's time for a little plant and tree love!  Thank you all.

 

Alder, that tree is gorgeous.  Thank you for sharing that photo and sharing about the different parts of the tree.  That whole area is so beautiful.


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#7 Alder Logs

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 01:17 PM

I sometimes describe myself (here in this lifetime) as a tree-hugger with a sawmill.    Yesterday I had to mow my future shop area to stem the encroachment of the jungle.  In doing so, I had to mow some foxglove plants whom I would love to have left to flower.  It hurt to do that, but I did it.   I fell trees and saw them up too.   I bought the sawmill so I could have lumber without doing clearcuts.  I have taken out dead or dying Douglas firs and western red cedars.  When my logging is done, the forest is still there.  That's why I do it that way, instead of going to the lumber yard.   I built a lumber storage structure two years ago and in the past few days of no rain, moved my dried lumber into it.  I will soon get some pictures of the stored lumber and post them to the thread where I chronicled the build. 


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#8 Alder Logs

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:51 PM

Okay, as promised, I got the pics of the lumber storage and posted it.  Here's the link:

https://mycotopia.ne...om-farm/page-14



#9 Harlow

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 09:50 AM

We are required to utilize living things in order to survive and thrive...what is important is how we use those resources and how we respect them.  You are not going through and clearing large sections of land, leaving the land bare just for some extra cash in your pocket.  You use what you need, especially the dying trees, and if you cut down living trees it is in a respectful manner.  Like you said, the forest is still there when you are done.  You are using those resources but you are also living with the land, not abusing the land.  That is what is really important.  The fact that you are still bothered when you cut the foxglove plants shows you care, and you would not have done so for a less important reason.  I believe this is the difference in how we should be living with and off the land, rather than just USING the land and living things.  Thanks for the lumber storage picture.

 

At some point in my life I would like to move to a green lush place like that in your pictures.  It is so beautiful there.


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