Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

Surprise cubes growing in yard


  • Please log in to reply
72 replies to this topic

#21 Microbe

Microbe

    civis scientiam

  • OG VIP
  • 4,419 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 20 June 2019 - 10:34 AM

I would clone one, it might have naturalized to your area, I would then do PF cakes, or a gourmet block (coir + bran), and then bury it outside when colonized.

Cubensis is much more adaptive than people think.

Im thinking they grew from the substrate he tossed out there and not up from the earth beneath but i could be wrong.

Edit: just seen your last post about naturalized.

Edited by Microbe, 20 June 2019 - 10:37 AM.

  • PJammer24 and Ferather like this

#22 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:11 PM

I meant more naturalized to the local environment more than the media. That being said Cubensis do grow on 'enriched' soils.
You need lots of oxygen to trigger anti-oxidant production, in addition even gourmet fruits are richer outdoors.

It's unlikely you will beat the richness of outdoor fruits, indoors, unless you have an extreme setup.
People grow active wood-lovers, by burying colonized cakes-blocks (enriched).

----

https://freshcapmush...he-king-oyster/

Indoor (medium oxygen, limited light) vs outdoor, Golden oyster.

IMG_20160729_212252.jpg IMG_20160510_152615.jpg

====

Also note, coco coir is not much different in composition to wood, cellulose-lignin (cellulose, hemicellulose, phenols-other).

"Coco’s woody, structural tissues consist of roughly two-thirds carbohydrates and one-third lignin.
The carbohydrates are the complex polysaccharides cellulose and hemicellulose."

Source

----

Psilocybe Cubensis Burma

Here I produced a selective isolate, which was germinated on WL-Tek, plus a sugar peg (cut down toothpick).
Once the peg was colonized, it was transferred to T-Gel + sucrose + MG, then to T-Gel plain.

T-Gel plain, contains no sugar, starch or cellulose (mostly all phenols-other).
The end result was adapted Burma, with white-rot ability.

https://mycotopia.ne...-3#entry1404587

----

Since phenols-other (and other materials), decay to oxygen, the mycelium must facilitate higher amounts of oxygen for enzymes and reactants.
Active materials are a primitive antioxidant, which defends the mycelium from oxidative damage, and allows for more oxygen.

Fruit bodies will normally be growing into air, and usually mycelium prefer to stay just under the surface.
I have noticed when mixing spawn, that the surface growth bruises the most.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3488923/

====

tab1-2k10-92-101.gif

Awesome information! I just skimmed through a little bit of it... but I'm definitely going to be reading over it again later today
Thank you

#23 Ferather

Ferather

    Mycological

  • Free Member
  • 1,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:28 PM

@Microbe: Yes, I apologize, it was slightly generic. No problem, I doubt bovine and equine dung will differ much around the world (in general terms), the same for each wood type, and PF cakes.

@Opendoors: No problem, yes it's a little complex, but I am trying to explain how things work in a simple enough way, for everyone to understand. Feel free to ask questions.


Edited by Ferather, 20 June 2019 - 12:29 PM.

  • Microbe likes this

#24 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:31 PM

I couldn't let them go to waste... I went ahead and a picked a few and left a few out to spread their spores
Somethings been nibbling on them , figure it might as well be me
It surprised me how strongly they were anchored into the ground , I'm also surprised by how solid and meaty they are
I think it's a mixture of z strain , golden teacher , and pfclassic
I'll give them a try in a couple days

Attached Thumbnails

  • tmp-cam-7953567699957027329.jpg
  • tmp-cam-4401879087977713771.jpg

Edited by Opendoors, 20 June 2019 - 12:35 PM.

  • roc and Ferather like this

#25 Ferather

Ferather

    Mycological

  • Free Member
  • 1,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:33 PM

Tub-o-mixed-magics

 

:tongue:



#26 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:43 PM

@Microbe: Yes, I apologize, it was slightly generic. No problem, I doubt bovine and equine dung will differ much around the world (in general terms), the same for each wood type, and PF cakes.
@Opendoors: No problem, yes it's a little complex, but I am trying to explain how things work in a simple enough way, for everyone to understand. Feel free to ask questions.

Yes ...I love the complexity of mushrooms, it seems like no matter how much i read , i still find more material and am always learning , and i love learning anything that has to do with nature
  • Ferather likes this

#27 Ferather

Ferather

    Mycological

  • Free Member
  • 1,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:55 PM

Indeed. I also have another tip, if you are able to clone tissue I would suggest doing so, spores will be a collection of random genetics, ideally if you want to grow outside again, you want the genetics that fruited.

Are you able to use agar? I'm not so sure if you will be able to make a clean clone if you can't, even if you put a sample to egg carton, it will probably still need to go on agar as normal.



#28 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 20 June 2019 - 01:48 PM

Indeed. I also have another tip, if you are able to clone tissue I would suggest doing so, spores will be a collection of random genetics, ideally if you want to grow outside again, you want the genetics that fruited.
Are you able to use agar? I'm not so sure if you will be able to make a clean clone if you can't, even if you put a sample to egg carton, it will probably still need to go on agar as normal.

Agar is my next venture, I've explored pretty much every aspect of indoor growing(within reason) except agar.. and pf cakes( but not really interested in those) and I've had alot of luck ... I was a little intimidated by agar at first but I've had so much luck with everything else that I'm confident enouph to try it
  • Ferather likes this

#29 Ferather

Ferather

    Mycological

  • Free Member
  • 1,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 21 June 2019 - 07:27 AM

If you have issues with making wedges (I know a few people with shaky hands), you can try cut down wooden toothpicks, hydrated and sterilized.

My containers are much taller than plates, so I can just add a peg in front of mycelium, wait for growth, then transfer.

 

The pegs can be removed, and re-used, in addition more pegs can be added (same holes).

Use metal tweezers, they can be flamed over, or chemically cleaned.

 

IMG_20181119_204221.jpg   IMG_20181122_133646.jpg   IMG_20190101_115805.jpg

 

Flame the peg to remove excess water.


Edited by Ferather, 21 June 2019 - 07:29 AM.

  • Microbe and Opendoors like this

#30 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 21 June 2019 - 06:17 PM

I pulled this meaty mofo out of my yard this afternoon .... there was nothing there this morning ...this things solid , golden teacher?
Ferather, want about doing a spore print off this until my agar comes in?

Attached Thumbnails

  • tmp-cam-5676236843961825753.jpg


#31 Ferather

Ferather

    Mycological

  • Free Member
  • 1,437 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 22 June 2019 - 06:39 AM

I am not a dictator, you can do what ever you like, taking a clone was a suggestion. If you have Cubensis popping up overnight, that's a really good sign.

Sounds like you have a very good environment outside (in your area), I would take note of the humidity and temperature for reference.

 

You can Google to find local stats for your area in the world, for example "London temperature humidity".

 

This way, when the weather is good, you can start an outdoor grow in the future.


  • Boebs and Opendoors like this

#32 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 11,594 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 22 June 2019 - 08:29 AM

Would anyone seriously pick and eat these ?

 

One thing I feel compelled to remind people who toss spent subs in their yards to get a few more mushrooms (which everyone should do!) is that we need to Positively identify each individual mushroom.

 

Don't assume that all of the mushrooms growing in roughly the same spot outside are all the same species.

 

This old thread I posted back in '09 has an example of the kind of thing to watch out for (with pictures):  https://mycotopia.ne...k-alike-thread/

 

And if there are still some concerns about eating positively identified outdoor mushrooms then make tea with them.


  • roc, Tenderfoot, Ferather and 1 other like this

#33 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 22 June 2019 - 03:50 PM

Would anyone seriously pick and eat these ?


One thing I feel compelled to remind people who toss spent subs in their yards to get a few more mushrooms (which everyone should do!) is that we need to Positively identify each individual mushroom.

Don't assume that all of the mushrooms growing in roughly the same spot outside are all the same species.

This old thread I posted back in '09 has an example of the kind of thing to watch out for (with pictures): https://mycotopia.ne...k-alike-thread/

And if there are still some concerns about eating positively identified outdoor mushrooms then make tea with them.
Great info ... thanks
I ended up eating them last night ... my gf and I ate about 5gs a piece of some dry fruit I had.... but we just ate some 3 days earlier( I keep trying to make myself wait a week, but impatience combined with beer always talks me into eating them early ) I've been eating between 5 to 7gs on average every 4 days and have been doing so for months... I still go on some beautiful trips, but doing them so frequently it's kind of hit and miss
Anyway , 5g last was a good mellow ride and after a couple hours I( still drunk and ringing off the mush) decided I wanted more than a mellow ride so I cut up the fruit I picked from yard and threw it in a pan of boiling water( it was 94 g wet)I made tea ..the outside fruit were incredibly dense and they were extra nasty
I expected a big come up.... but I think I already passed my peak from the ones I ate earlier
I ended up just getting this weird sleepy spaced out body high that just had me in a stupor, so I just laid down and watched a doc on sid barret ... then I laid in bed all night trying to sleep while I listened to my head hum-I hate when that happens - so I'm on no sleep, drinking a beer and trying to nurse this mushroom hangover
...I've got to learn some self control

Btw I love your honey tek , I have 50gs sitting in honey now ... can't wait to try it... oh wait, no , self control
  • TVCasualty likes this

#34 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 24 June 2019 - 01:34 PM

I have another question : does anybody throw contaminated sub in their graveyard?
I had a beautiful looking sub going in a 20qt tub I pulled the first flush, and dunked it( actually heavily misted it) I drained it ,after 12 hrs , for thirty mins and when I checked it this morning I found a suspicious looking patch, not wanting to take any chances I threw it on out in the yard in the same spot where I picked the last volunteer mushrooms, I had 4 wbs qt jats in that 20qt tub and only got one flush before I threw it out so it should grow a few more , but if its contaminated should I have not threw it in my graveyard? Will the mush that grow in the yard be contaminated?
Another question : if I make a spore print from a contaminated sub, go through all proper procedures and keep it extremely dry, will the contamination die off and the spores continue to live ? I'm trying it as experiment

#35 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 11,594 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 June 2019 - 01:45 PM

One of my very first successful grows (and among the most ironic) came from a horribly contaminated tray of grain that had three different colors of mold growing on it.

 

I took the tray outside and dumped it out off next to some bushes. It rained like hell the following afternoon. A few days later there were a dozen or so giant mushrooms growing out of the pile and the colorful contaminants were no longer visible (but probably still present).

 

Another early success was with a similarly-contaminated batch of jars that I put into a clear trashbag (edit: just the cakes from the jars, not the actual jars) and set out next to the trash for the next trip to the dump (we had no trash service living deep in the hollers of the Appalachians). A few days later I noticed a nice flush of large mushrooms growing inside the trash bag.

 

I'd been lovin' on 'em for weeks, fussing with them and taking care to accommodate whatever it seemed they needed but i guess all they really needed was for me to back off and let them do their thing like they've been doing without any help for for millions of years.

 

It's hard to beat the fresh air exchange rates you'll get growing outdoors, and just being outside sure seems to help achieve success so it appears to me that lots of fresh air is the key to success more so than humid air.


Edited by TVCasualty, 24 June 2019 - 01:46 PM.

  • roc, Ferather and Opendoors like this

#36 roc

roc

    Forum International Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 7,987 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 June 2019 - 01:49 PM

One of my very first successful grows (and among the most ironic) came from a horribly contaminated tray of grain that had three different colors of mold growing on it.

 

I took the tray outside and dumped it out off next to some bushes. It rained like hell the following afternoon. A few days later there were a dozen or so giant mushrooms growing out of the pile and the colorful contaminants were no longer visible (but probably still present).

 

Another early success was with a similarly-contaminated batch of jars that I put into a clear trashbag (edit: just the cakes from the jars, not the actual jars) and set out next to the trash for the next trip to the dump (we had no trash service living deep in the hollers of the Appalachians). A few days later I noticed a nice flush of large mushrooms growing inside the trash bag.

 

I'd been lovin' on 'em for weeks, fussing with them and taking care to accommodate whatever it seemed they needed but i guess all they really needed was for me to back off and let them do their thing like they've been doing without any help for for millions of years.

 

It's hard to beat the fresh air exchange rates you'll get growing outdoors, and just being outside sure seems to help achieve success so it appears to me that lots of fresh air is the key to success more so than humid air.

Besides the air exchange I believe the UV all but destroys the green mold.

Mother nature knows her shit and has powers beyond our ability to duplicate.


  • TVCasualty and Opendoors like this

#37 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 24 June 2019 - 01:56 PM

They're still going strong

Attached Thumbnails

  • tmp-cam-9066877919518599471.jpg

  • joeya likes this

#38 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 24 June 2019 - 02:10 PM

Yesterdays

Attached Thumbnails

  • tmp-cam-2623017959394716641.jpg


#39 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 24 June 2019 - 02:38 PM

One of my very first successful grows (and among the most ironic) came from a horribly contaminated tray of grain that had three different colors of mold growing on it.

I took the tray outside and dumped it out off next to some bushes. It rained like hell the following afternoon. A few days later there were a dozen or so giant mushrooms growing out of the pile and the colorful contaminants were no longer visible (but probably still present).

Another early success was with a similarly-contaminated batch of jars that I put into a clear trashbag (edit: just the cakes from the jars, not the actual jars) and set out next to the trash for the next trip to the dump (we had no trash service living deep in the hollers of the Appalachians). A few days later I noticed a nice flush of large mushrooms growing inside the trash bag.

I'd been lovin' on 'em for weeks, fussing with them and taking care to accommodate whatever it seemed they needed but i guess all they really needed was for me to back off and let them do their thing like they've been doing without any help for for millions of years.

It's hard to beat the fresh air exchange rates you'll get growing outdoors, and just being outside sure seems to help achieve success so it appears to me that lots of fresh air is the key to success more so than humid air.

That's funny , I've only been growing a couple years , and pretty clumsy, scatterbrained , and forgetful( I'm also experimental)and my best grows always come from all the things screw up on or forget to do( which, I admit , is almost everytime)yet I'm repeatedly successful, not by skill or knowledge, just by blind luck, I've only had 2 or 3 out of maybe 40 grows contaminate on me , and I'm not even sure if they contaminated , I just didnt want to take chances
But it's like everytime I make a mistake or get clumsy or forget something( or accidentally do something everyone says not to do) I get my best grows.... its like this hobby is perfect for me ( now if I could just learn a little self control and stop doing them so much...) it's funny how they work , only under their own terms

#40 Opendoors

Opendoors

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 147 posts

Posted 24 June 2019 - 02:42 PM

One of my very first successful grows (and among the most ironic) came from a horribly contaminated tray of grain that had three different colors of mold growing on it.

I took the tray outside and dumped it out off next to some bushes. It rained like hell the following afternoon. A few days later there were a dozen or so giant mushrooms growing out of the pile and the colorful contaminants were no longer visible (but probably still present).

Another early success was with a similarly-contaminated batch of jars that I put into a clear trashbag (edit: just the cakes from the jars, not the actual jars) and set out next to the trash for the next trip to the dump (we had no trash service living deep in the hollers of the Appalachians). A few days later I noticed a nice flush of large mushrooms growing inside the trash bag.

I'd been lovin' on 'em for weeks, fussing with them and taking care to accommodate whatever it seemed they needed but i guess all they really needed was for me to back off and let them do their thing like they've been doing without any help for for millions of years.

It's hard to beat the fresh air exchange rates you'll get growing outdoors, and just being outside sure seems to help achieve success so it appears to me that lots of fresh air is the key to success more so than humid air.

Besides the air exchange I believe the UV all but destroys the green mold.
Mother nature knows her shit and has powers beyond our ability to duplicate.
I'm starting to see that now ... where I live is not ideal at all for cubes but , coincidentally, weve had the perfect weather lately and when my totes were undoubtedly done growing indoors nature pulled the rest out of them

Edited by Opendoors, 24 June 2019 - 02:43 PM.





Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!