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what are the pros and cons of using straw as a sub?


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#21 peacefrog

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 01:27 PM

Thank you sandy.

I used to keep my Martha cranked up pretty high with my cool mist doing my oyster grows. There was more than enough moisture in there to keep all well.

That finally did tam after the 3rd flush but that culture is usually spent after 2nd or 3rd anyway, so I didn’t mind lol.

With cubes, yes I use tubs and case very thick. ~1-2 inches. It takes longer for the casing colonization, but helps me keep my moisture levels throughout several flushes. I always patch the casing in between flushes and mist very well directly after.
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#22 CatsAndBats

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 01:35 PM

Thank you sandy.

I used to keep my Martha cranked up pretty high with my cool mist doing my oyster grows. There was more than enough moisture in there to keep all well.

That finally did tam after the 3rd flush but that culture is usually spent after 2nd or 3rd anyway, so I didn’t mind lol.

With cubes, yes I use tubs and case very thick. ~1-2 inches. It takes longer for the casing colonization, but helps me keep my moisture levels throughout several flushes. I always patch the casing in between flushes and mist very well directly after.

 

 

I did an all straw grow recently, like idk, 5-6 shoe boxes. They all contaminated before first flush. It was baffling to me because I rarely contaminate before 3rd flush. What's your pasteurization method for straw?


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#23 peacefrog

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 01:42 PM

Cats my great friend! Good to see you around brother.


It would be easier just to post a link to that very cube grow I did recently: https://mycotopia.ne...with-peacefrog/

It has pics, as we all know I love to share um lol and details my exact pasteurizion schedule for straw.

I had such a frustrating time when I first started working with straw. All I grew was green lol. Then I figured out that my pasteurizion technique needed tweaking. I do this every time and unless I screw something up, I rarely have issues for a few flushes.

Good vibes.

Edited by peacefrog, 22 June 2019 - 01:47 PM.

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#24 TVCasualty

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Posted 23 June 2019 - 11:07 AM

One additional factor that probably played a role in my getting so many flushes from my last grow is that the room I was using had constant positive pressure provided by my old flow hood.

 

I closed off an opening to the room and mounted my old hood on the wall:

 

Room_Filter.jpg

 

The register with the piece of blue tape on it allowed for some of the room air to be recirculated in order to minimize temperature fluctuations (which was more of an issue in Winter when I was heating the room; too much flow pushed all the heat out). The other side of the intake opening had a big pre-filter covering it which also helped muffle the sound.

 

I don't think I'm going to grow in a room without it after those results. With two exceptions (out of 14 trays) I only tossed those subs because they quit producing anything at all; they never contaminated. The fourth and fifth 'flushes' were just a few mushrooms each, but they were impressively large.

 

So at this point my approach to using straw includes getting the cleanest straw possible, pasteurizing it for a very long time (~12 hrs. minimum), and fruiting in a room that has positive-pressure HEPA filtration.

 

I'm not sure yet how important the top-dressing of coarse vermiculite was that I used, but I'd guess it was a relevant factor. I only used it because I didn't want to leave the straw exposed to air and I'd been forced to scrape off a top-dressing of pasteurized Hpoo that repelled ANY life form that attempted to grow on it, including any contams.

 

Mycelium will grow through/around most anything in its path but none of it would even touch that Hpoo. After a few weeks (when I noticed it wasn't being colonized) I scraped it off, dunked them, and added the verm thinking the grow was toast but might as well give it one more try, then a week later the pins were forming. So the first flush didn't even begin until nearly a month after the trays were spawned, suggesting the extra-long incubation time may be beneficial as well.

 

 

 

 


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#25 PJammer24

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 10:02 AM

 

Thank you sandy.

I used to keep my Martha cranked up pretty high with my cool mist doing my oyster grows. There was more than enough moisture in there to keep all well.

That finally did tam after the 3rd flush but that culture is usually spent after 2nd or 3rd anyway, so I didn’t mind lol.

With cubes, yes I use tubs and case very thick. ~1-2 inches. It takes longer for the casing colonization, but helps me keep my moisture levels throughout several flushes. I always patch the casing in between flushes and mist very well directly after.

 

 

I did an all straw grow recently, like idk, 5-6 shoe boxes. They all contaminated before first flush. It was baffling to me because I rarely contaminate before 3rd flush. What's your pasteurization method for straw?

 

 

 

I ALWAYS pasteurize a little longer when I am using straw... One of the reasons you need it finely chopped is that there are plenty of places for contaminate spores to hide out...

 

The straw was also out in a field for months prior to the grain being harvested... Then it sat out in the field a little longer and has been well exposed to the elements... Not to mention the dust that gets kicked up while harvesting the grain and again when cutting, tettering, raking, and bailing the straw... Straw does not live a clean lifestyle, Straw be a dirty mofo!

 

You also have to give the straw a 12-24 hour soak prior to pasteurization so that any latent seeds or endospores germinate so that they can be neutralized by the pasteurization process. More than once, I have forgotten to soak pre-steam and ended up with grass and other sprouts growing up through my sub... When this has happened, I can almost guarantee contamination.

 

The soak also helps clean it up a little... Even the cleanest straw is a little dirty!


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#26 roc

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 11:56 AM

PJ's mention that straw has many of places for contamination made me stop and think...

 

Straw needs to be tightly compressed for quick colonization and elimination of air spaces.

Most commercial oyster growers use plastic 10 inch tubing that is stuffed tightly, tied off and is hung vertically.

If my memory serves me right Visions Baskets were weighted down on top to help compress the straw during colonization.


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#27 CatsAndBats

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 12:45 PM

One additional factor that probably played a role in my getting so many flushes from my last grow is that the room I was using had constant positive pressure provided by my old flow hood.

 

I closed off an opening to the room and mounted my old hood on the wall:

 

 

 

The register with the piece of blue tape on it allowed for some of the room air to be recirculated in order to minimize temperature fluctuations (which was more of an issue in Winter when I was heating the room; too much flow pushed all the heat out). The other side of the intake opening had a big pre-filter covering it which also helped muffle the sound.

 

I don't think I'm going to grow in a room without it after those results. With two exceptions (out of 14 trays) I only tossed those subs because they quit producing anything at all; they never contaminated. The fourth and fifth 'flushes' were just a few mushrooms each, but they were impressively large.

 

So at this point my approach to using straw includes getting the cleanest straw possible, pasteurizing it for a very long time (~12 hrs. minimum), and fruiting in a room that has positive-pressure HEPA filtration.

 

I'm not sure yet how important the top-dressing of coarse vermiculite was that I used, but I'd guess it was a relevant factor. I only used it because I didn't want to leave the straw exposed to air and I'd been forced to scrape off a top-dressing of pasteurized Hpoo that repelled ANY life form that attempted to grow on it, including any contams.

 

Mycelium will grow through/around most anything in its path but none of it would even touch that Hpoo. After a few weeks (when I noticed it wasn't being colonized) I scraped it off, dunked them, and added the verm thinking the grow was toast but might as well give it one more try, then a week later the pins were forming. So the first flush didn't even begin until nearly a month after the trays were spawned, suggesting the extra-long incubation time may be beneficial as well.

 

Do you have any theories as to why the myc wouldn't touch the horse dung? That statement threw me off.

 

 

 

 

Thank you sandy.

I used to keep my Martha cranked up pretty high with my cool mist doing my oyster grows. There was more than enough moisture in there to keep all well.

That finally did tam after the 3rd flush but that culture is usually spent after 2nd or 3rd anyway, so I didn’t mind lol.

With cubes, yes I use tubs and case very thick. ~1-2 inches. It takes longer for the casing colonization, but helps me keep my moisture levels throughout several flushes. I always patch the casing in between flushes and mist very well directly after.

 

 

I did an all straw grow recently, like idk, 5-6 shoe boxes. They all contaminated before first flush. It was baffling to me because I rarely contaminate before 3rd flush. What's your pasteurization method for straw?

 

 

 

I ALWAYS pasteurize a little longer when I am using straw... One of the reasons you need it finely chopped is that there are plenty of places for contaminate spores to hide out...

 

The straw was also out in a field for months prior to the grain being harvested... Then it sat out in the field a little longer and has been well exposed to the elements... Not to mention the dust that gets kicked up while harvesting the grain and again when cutting, tettering, raking, and bailing the straw... Straw does not live a clean lifestyle, Straw be a dirty mofo!

 

You also have to give the straw a 12-24 hour soak prior to pasteurization so that any latent seeds or endospores germinate so that they can be neutralized by the pasteurization process. More than once, I have forgotten to soak pre-steam and ended up with grass and other sprouts growing up through my sub... When this has happened, I can almost guarantee contamination.

 

The soak also helps clean it up a little... Even the cleanest straw is a little dirty!

 

 

Lots of good tips in that post! :biggrin:

 

It's weird, I processed my straw with the same process that I use when I add it as a supplement and I rarely get contaminations during the spawn run.   

 

 

                                                                                                                            gallery_147940_1513_4238.png


Edited by CatsAndBats, 24 June 2019 - 12:48 PM.

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#28 TVCasualty

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 01:25 PM


Do you have any theories as to why the myc wouldn't touch the horse dung? That statement threw me off.

 

Yes, two. Both probably have some merit.

 

One is that the terrible results were due to it being stall-gathered hpoo. This happened in two separate cases with hpoo from two different barns from separate properties. Gotta get it from the pasture to be sure, I guess.

 

But also in both cases, I found discarded empty tubes of veterinary medicine for horses. I couldn't tell what it was (old, couldn't read labels) but it was clear the horses were being medicated with something (and a lot of it judging by the number of empty tubes). But in one case the manure was at least 5 years old so I'd hoped any residual medication would have broken down or been leached away be the time I gathered it.

 

I'd lean more towards the medication since the hpoo fell right off the trays leaving a perfect, undamaged surface of the fully-colonized block of straw. I doubt that piss-soaked stall poop would so thoroughly inhibit growth, especially after sitting in a barn for many years (hard to say how many, maybe 5 or 10). Or I used to doubt that, anyway.


Edited by TVCasualty, 24 June 2019 - 01:26 PM.

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#29 peacefrog

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 03:56 PM

You also have to give the straw a 12-24 hour soak prior to pasteurization so that any latent seeds or endospores germinate so that they can be neutralized by the pasteurization process. More than once, I have forgotten to soak pre-steam and ended up with grass and other sprouts growing up through my sub... When this has happened, I can almost guarantee contamination.

The soak also helps clean it up a little... Even the cleanest straw is a little dirty!

Nothing wrong or bad with that advice, but I have tried the pre-soak method with soap, no soap, lime and I don’t remember how many more variations over the years. And I never saw a benefit to it really.

I dont soak mine ever, it goes straight from the dedicated clean trash can I use for my processing with my trusty old weed eater straight into the water.

Just me though. It definitely will not hurt anything at all to pre-soak its just an added step I refrain from.

My tips and what I have learned over the years working with straw are:
1). Process it and pasteurize it properly at very consistent temperatures for at least an hour. Longer is better of course.

2). Clean spawn! Anything questionable goes straight to top fruit in another room or in the trash (depending on if I spot mold verses possible slight bacterial infections).

3), Spawn heavy and as cleanly as possible.

4), As roc said, tightly compacted after spawning.

5), For cubes, case much thicker than normal for better moisture retention and control via misting for multiple flushes.

Those 5 things have helped me a lot when working with straw and maintaining consistent results and very manageable contamination rates.

Edited by peacefrog, 24 June 2019 - 04:11 PM.

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#30 PJammer24

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 01:29 PM

 


Do you have any theories as to why the myc wouldn't touch the horse dung? That statement threw me off.

 

Yes, two. Both probably have some merit.

 

One is that the terrible results were due to it being stall-gathered hpoo. This happened in two separate cases with hpoo from two different barns from separate properties. Gotta get it from the pasture to be sure, I guess.

 

But also in both cases, I found discarded empty tubes of veterinary medicine for horses. I couldn't tell what it was (old, couldn't read labels) but it was clear the horses were being medicated with something (and a lot of it judging by the number of empty tubes). But in one case the manure was at least 5 years old so I'd hoped any residual medication would have broken down or been leached away be the time I gathered it.

 

I'd lean more towards the medication since the hpoo fell right off the trays leaving a perfect, undamaged surface of the fully-colonized block of straw. I doubt that piss-soaked stall poop would so thoroughly inhibit growth, especially after sitting in a barn for many years (hard to say how many, maybe 5 or 10). Or I used to doubt that, anyway.

 

 

 

I use hpoo in all of my grows and 95% of it comes from the stalls which are cleaned every sunday... I was about to comment that hpoo from the stalls is just fine for use in our hobby but then it occurred to me that while it does come from the stalls, I have a concrete block pit built out back where I age it... It gets rained on plenty (especially the last couple years) so it is leached well and it also starts to compost since I work my way down and what I use is typically 2-3 months old at a minimum. It is possible that your manure was urine soaked that somehow made it not colonize but I suspect we are missing a key element to why this happened...

 

I feel like in the past, prior to building my pit, the manure being used had not been leached well and I was still getting acceptable results... This is years ago... I know I was not as thorough back then but I can't recall if I was using it directly from the stalls or not....

 

Our horses are old and they have been medicated off and on. Horses stomachs do not process food all that well which is why they get colicky... I suppose it is possible that certain medications don't get metabolized completely and there is some remnant in the manure...

 

Rereading your post... urine soaked or not, I feel like the PH would have balanced after 5 years and that the manure would have started to break down to a significant degree...

 

This really is a conundrum!! Even if it was fresh manure, that had been urinated on, if it was then pasteurized for use, I think you would have acheived full colonization... I am baffled!!

 

I also believe that most pasteurization processes do a fair job of leaching the urine... If you are doing it stove top, the manure gets fairly well washed... Before I steam substrate, I pour hot water over it to make sure it is saturated and to raise the temperatures so I don't have to wait as long for it to hit 160 degrees and I feel between the hot water and the steam, it is getting leached...

 

I wish you still had this questionable manure... I would really like to get to the bottom of this!! My horses are older so they have been switched to a senior sweet feed... I have questioned whether the extra sugars they are digesting produces positive or negative effects when I then use the manure in my projects... i wish I had a younger horse who was still eating straight oats so I could make the side by side comparison!!



#31 PJammer24

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 01:37 PM

 

You also have to give the straw a 12-24 hour soak prior to pasteurization so that any latent seeds or endospores germinate so that they can be neutralized by the pasteurization process. More than once, I have forgotten to soak pre-steam and ended up with grass and other sprouts growing up through my sub... When this has happened, I can almost guarantee contamination.

The soak also helps clean it up a little... Even the cleanest straw is a little dirty!

Nothing wrong or bad with that advice, but I have tried the pre-soak method with soap, no soap, lime and I don’t remember how many more variations over the years. And I never saw a benefit to it really.

I dont soak mine ever, it goes straight from the dedicated clean trash can I use for my processing with my trusty old weed eater straight into the water.

Just me though. It definitely will not hurt anything at all to pre-soak its just an added step I refrain from.

My tips and what I have learned over the years working with straw are:
1). Process it and pasteurize it properly at very consistent temperatures for at least an hour. Longer is better of course.

2). Clean spawn! Anything questionable goes straight to top fruit in another room or in the trash (depending on if I spot mold verses possible slight bacterial infections).

3), Spawn heavy and as cleanly as possible.

4), As roc said, tightly compacted after spawning.

5), For cubes, case much thicker than normal for better moisture retention and control via misting for multiple flushes.

Those 5 things have helped me a lot when working with straw and maintaining consistent results and very manageable contamination rates.

 

 

 

So you are telling me that you never have seeds sprout straight out of your substrates when you don't soak it prior to pasteurization? I rarely use straw these days but in the past, every time I forgot the overnight soak, I ended up with seeds sprouting my substrate... I would get grasses growing up and without fail I ended up contaminated...

 

Where are you sourcing your straw? Is this well cleaned hobby straw? Mine is coming straight out of the hayloft where the farmer down the street unloaded it after pulling it off the field... Maybe my raw materials are dirtier from the get....

 

I am also amazed that you get away with only an hour of pasteurization.. I pasteurize for a minimum of 4 hours at steady temperatures of around 170 degrees...I usually aim for a 5-6 hour pasteurization.

 

What pasteurizing method do you use? I built a pasteurizer that is fed by two wallpaper steamers... I got turned on to the PID tip several months back so the PID keeps the temperature within a couple degrees of 170F. Inside the pasteurizer, which is a big rubber made with a second rubber made flipped upside down and set on top, is a 2 shelf rack that I put bags of substrate on. The bags are mesh laundry bags that I fill with whatever raw material I am working with... Straw for oysters as an example... The method is flexible and allows me to do as much or as little as I like...

 

I am amazed by the 1 hour pasteurization and that you don't find yourself either contaminating due to no soak or having seeds sprout and grow up through your substrate... I already asked this, but from where do you source your straw?


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#32 peacefrog

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 02:07 PM

I have gotten my straw from many sources over the years. Home Depot, Lowe’s, local nurseries, etc. (standard bails of wheat straw). They have all acted the same if treated properly.

I have NEVER had grass sprouts from my pasteurized and spawned straw. I have grown a shit ton of the green monster before but never grass.

I promise you an hour is sufficient (however the low end) if all the material stays with pasteurization temperatures. Longer is always better, but 1-3 hours is all I do. Try keeping a lower pasteurization temp. I like to keep all of mine at 140-160. I know there is debate about the “perfect pasteurization temps” for substrate but that’s what has worked for me over the years. I keep manure at the same temps.

I promise you, you do not have to soak. It may be a beneficial step but not necessary. Like I said in my previous post, I agree there is absolutely nothing wrong with doing that step. But I have found no reason for it to help me with my grows. Just me.

I do an old school pillow case tek. Works like a charm for me and my style of growing. There is a previous post in this thread where I linked my grow explaining my procedures. It’s on the previous page.

Good vibes my friend!

EDIT: Here is a pic of the bail that I have used on a small amount so far:
5DB17099-E502-490C-A37E-5DA41778D107.jpeg

In my shed. Very dirty conditions. But that’s what the proper pasteurization does. It cleans it up and knocks back the competitors until your mycelium has taken over and beaten them.

Edited by peacefrog, 25 June 2019 - 02:33 PM.

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#33 HrVanker

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 02:39 PM



Where are you sourcing your straw? Is this well cleaned hobby straw? Mine is coming straight out of the hayloft where the farmer down the street unloaded it after pulling it off the field... Maybe my raw materials are dirtier from the get....


Are you sure that you aren't getting hay? Hay is whole grass, so you get the seed tops and whatnot, because you're feeding it to cows/horses. Typically straw is cut from a grain field, after harvest, so all/most of the seeds are gone. I've not heard of a farmer feeding straw to their animals, unless it's to stretch the real hay or grain.

Hay will also have a much higher nutrition content, relative to straw. And would, I think, be more like spawning to pasteurized grass seed, than pasteurized straw. Hence contamination.
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#34 TVCasualty

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 04:13 PM

This really is a conundrum!! Even if it was fresh manure, that had been urinated on, if it was then pasteurized for use, I think you would have acheived full colonization... I am baffled!!

So am I. I've used hpoo a lot over the years and never had anything like this happen before, even when I've gotten it from a stall and it had pine shavings and rocks in it.

 

And the fact that it happened with hpoo sourced from two different locations was doubly baffling. But the one thing both locations had in common was empty medication tubes laying around.


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#35 CatsAndBats

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 05:13 PM

I have gotten my straw from many sources over the years. Home Depot, Lowe’s, local nurseries, etc. (standard bails of wheat straw). They have all acted the same if treated properly.

I have NEVER had grass sprouts from my pasteurized and spawned straw. I have grown a shit ton of the green monster before but never grass.

I promise you an hour is sufficient (however the low end) if all the material stays with pasteurization temperatures. Longer is always better, but 1-3 hours is all I do. Try keeping a lower pasteurization temp. I like to keep all of mine at 140-160. I know there is debate about the “perfect pasteurization temps” for substrate but that’s what has worked for me over the years. I keep manure at the same temps.

I promise you, you do not have to soak. It may be a beneficial step but not necessary. Like I said in my previous post, I agree there is absolutely nothing wrong with doing that step. But I have found no reason for it to help me with my grows. Just me.

I do an old school pillow case tek. Works like a charm for me and my style of growing. There is a previous post in this thread where I linked my grow explaining my procedures. It’s on the previous page.

Good vibes my friend!

EDIT: Here is a pic of the bail that I have used on a small amount so far:


In my shed. Very dirty conditions. But that’s what the proper pasteurization does. It cleans it up and knocks back the competitors until your mycelium has taken over and beaten them.&&0){for(var>
)throw>

 

Microbe turned me on to using 5gal paint straining bags. They hold up to 221f and are

re-usable. They're cheap and useful for all sorts of myco-tasks.


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#36 PJammer24

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:51 AM

 

Where are you sourcing your straw? Is this well cleaned hobby straw? Mine is coming straight out of the hayloft where the farmer down the street unloaded it after pulling it off the field... Maybe my raw materials are dirtier from the get....


Are you sure that you aren't getting hay? Hay is whole grass, so you get the seed tops and whatnot, because you're feeding it to cows/horses. Typically straw is cut from a grain field, after harvest, so all/most of the seeds are gone. I've not heard of a farmer feeding straw to their animals, unless it's to stretch the real hay or grain.

Hay will also have a much higher nutrition content, relative to straw. And would, I think, be more like spawning to pasteurized grass seed, than pasteurized straw. Hence contamination.

 

 

lmfao... I grew up on a horse farm, I know the difference between hay and straw... We had our own hay fields for years. It is definitely not alfalfa or timothy...

 

It was probably wheat sprouts that were growing and not actual grass. The grain is harvested, and then the straw is cut and allowed to lay on the ground to dry for about a week... If it is humid or if they get rain while the straw is down, they use a tetter which spreads the cut straw around some more... So they are basically taking the straw and spreading it around in the middle of a field that has all kinds of different weeds growing in it... Then they rake it into rows and then they bale it... There are all kinds of miscellaneous seeds that get mixed in with both straw and hay... You have your wheat plant that grows up but then there is all kinds of vegetation growing beneath the canopy, weeds, grasses, etc... wheat and other cereal grains are not grown in a vacuum... That field is filled with tons of different plants which are producing seeds right around the same time that the wheat is producing seeds... Pretty much every bale of straw has seeds from many different types of plant baled in with it...

 

I have a bale of wheat straw and a bale of oat straw in my garage right now... It is pretty clean... I haven't used straw much for years, except for oysters... I used to use it in all of my substrate mixes... I will give it another try without the soak but I have had seeds sprout in my substrate after a 4-6 hour steam pasteurization at no less than 160 degrees...

 

I think that pasteurizing with steam is why I pasteurize so much longer than you, I have always thought that submerging the entire bag of substrate in water is probably a more thorough method. I have also had batches of substrate go bad due to their not being wet enough when put into the pasteurizer. That is not a concern with the method you use but when pasteurizing with steam it is pretty essential to have it thoroughly hydrated or it is not going to pasteurize properly.

I am pretty sure sandy pasteurizes for  4+ hours... We discussed pasteurization times in an old tek of his after I had been surprised by the short pasteurization times... he said that since, he has increased his times... I forget what pasteurization method he uses.

 

I also think that one of the reasons I need to pasteurize longer is

1. the steam method opposed to being completely submerged

and

2. I was doing large batches of straw for oysters when I had the sprouting issues, if I remember correctly, I think that the volume I am preparing may be why I have found that under 4 hours of pasteurization has given me trouble in the past.

 

I get almost not contamination prior to 4th flush, knock on wood. The only contaminates have had this year post pasteurization have been when my roommate didn't put enough substrate in the bags and the exposed grain contaminated... I toss them by 3rd or 4th flush... I am hesitant to change my methods, but if I could get away with pasteurizing for only 1 hour, that would be amazing!!


Edited by PJammer24, 26 June 2019 - 09:12 AM.

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#37 roc

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 12:40 PM

I'm going to guess but I believe that over 90% of oysters are still grown on wheat straw in hanging plastic tubes and have been for decades.

 

Pasteurize the straw, spawn it and stuff it in bags.

Yes it's that simple!

 

Growing up in SW Kansas I've bucked and stacked my share of straw bales and I can assure you that it gets no special treatment.

 

Let's not complicate things.

 

Maybe some of the peeps having trouble here don't know the difference between straw and alfalfa and their problems are related to growing on alfalfa.

PJ was pleasant but I find it fucking insulting for someone to ask if I was sure it was straw and not alfalfa!


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#38 HrVanker

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 12:44 PM

PJ was pleasant but I find it fucking insulting for someone to ask if I was sure it was straw and not alfalfa!

Lol
ed2b305af4a53c43efd5a134657dba9d.jpg

Edited by HrVanker, 26 June 2019 - 12:46 PM.

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#39 hyphaenation

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 02:23 PM

The thing about straw is ...the length of the dang stalks. They can dangle out or up and invite contams like an antenna. There are various ways of chopping it up from the humble scissor to varios shredders. I still love my trusty old leaf mulcher with bag attachment. I removed the plastic blade it came with which did nothing to the straw and welded a flat metal (sharpened) bar to a rachet-head and put the original screw through that to retain it. It sheds like a mofo! 2 passes and the straw is the size of chunky sawdust. Then it can be added with horse manure etc etc etc

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#40 roc

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 03:34 PM

 

PJ was pleasant but I find it fucking insulting for someone to ask if I was sure it was straw and not alfalfa!

Lol
 ed2b305af4a53c43efd5a134657dba9d.jpg

 

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I love you to man!

It's the farm boy thing so don't take offense... back in the day like 20 years ago we had peeps here that used timothy hay but we were trying a little of everything including Hip's Donkey shit!
Fun days!


Edited by roc, 26 June 2019 - 05:29 PM.

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