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Ps. Semperviva: Two substrates compared


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#1 DonShadow

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 08:17 PM

For this grow I tested the performance of Psilocybe semperviva/hoogshagenii var. convexa on two different substrates; a mixture of manure compost, coconut coir and vermiculite, as well as a supplemented coconut coir substrate. The trays, incubation and fruiting conditions were identical; both trays were incubated and fruited simultaneously in the same chamber, with the same casing, and both trays came from the same cloned liquid culture.

The recipe used for the manure compost substrate is as follows:

Makes about 3 quarts of substrate

- 1 quart manure compost (a mixture of composted chicken, horse and mushroom manure from a local farm)
- 80g dry coconut coir
- 1 to 1.5 quarts course vermiculite (add more vermiculite to adjust for field capacity)
- 25ml gypsum
- 25ml calcium carbonate (CaCO3) (add as much as required to achieve pH balance of 7 on probe meter)
- Approximately 1300ml reverse osmosis water (pour 1000ml boiled water over coir to hydrate. Once coir has been fully broken up, mix in remaining ingredients and add more water or vermiculite as needed to achieve field capacity)

 

The recipe used for the supplemented coir substrate is as follows:

Makes about 3 quarts of substrate

- 275g dry coconut coir
- 100ml used coffee grounds
- 100ml oat bran
- 100ml clean dry sand
- 25ml gypsum
- 25ml calcium carbonate (CaCO3) (add as much as required to achieve pH balance of 7 on probe meter)
- Approximately 1300ml reverse osmosis water (pour 1000ml boiled water over coir to hydrate. Once coir has been fully broken up, mix in remaining ingredients and add more water as needed to achieve field capacity)

The culture was a first-generation clone from a healthy specimen grown via MS on manure compost. No isolation was attempted, a vigorous looking sector was simply transferred to liquid culture, which was then used to inoculate two quart jars of millet, filled about 2/3 full. Millet makes an excellent grain spawn for its high surface area, compatibility and low cost.

 

Jars were incubated for 12 days @ 77-80F:

 

Photo 2019-05-01, 4 23 33 PM.jpg

 

 

When fully colonized, spawn was broken up and mixed with substrate at a ratio of 2 : 1 // sub : spawn in 3x6x9" trays. Substrate depth: 2 inches.

 

Photo 2019-05-01, 5 07 31 PM.jpg

 

 

And incubated for 12 days @ 77-80F

 

Photo 2019-05-12, 8 57 31 PM.jpg

Photo 2019-05-12, 9 05 42 PM.jpg

 

 

A casing mix of 10 : 1 : 0.5 // Peat moss : CaCO3 : Sand was applied very lightly with a fork at a depth of 1/4 - 1/2":

 

Photo 2019-05-12, 9 13 18 PM.jpg

 

The trays were then set out in this fruiting chamber. The only modifications made to the TEK were to change the lighting schedule to 12/12, move the exhaust fan to the center of the lid, and lessen the fanning cycle to 3 minutes every 6 hours (4x3 per 24 hrs). Trays were misted lightly once or twice daily, usually in the morning and before bed. The casing was kept just moist and fluffy, not dry or saturated.

 

 

Into the chamber they go:

 

Photo 2019-05-12, 9 24 42 PM.jpg

Photo 2019-05-12, 9 25 59 PM.jpg

 

 

With the blue actinic aquarium light on:

 

Photo 2019-05-12, 9 26 50 PM.jpg

 

 

The manure compost tub (right side) was the first to pin on day 20. It consistently grew more quickly, but far fewer fruits were produced.

 

Photo 2019-06-13, 3 11 54 PM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-13, 3 12 31 PM.jpg

 

 

The supplemented coir substrate (left side) started pinning on day 25 and was consistently more prolific.

 

Photo 2019-06-13, 3 12 24 PM.jpg

 

 

The next day:

 

Photo 2019-06-14, 7 00 05 PM.jpg

 

 

Three days later and some of the manure compost tub is ready to be harvested:

 

Photo 2019-06-17, 10 11 37 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-17, 10 12 31 AM.jpg

 

 

And the supplemented coir tray the same day:

 

Photo 2019-06-17, 10 11 22 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-17, 10 12 22 AM.jpg

 

 

Side-by-side comparison:

 

Photo 2019-06-17, 10 11 13 AM.jpg

 

 

Two days later:

 

Photo 2019-06-19, 8 40 28 PM.jpg

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Photo 2019-06-19, 8 45 31 PM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-19, 8 45 42 PM.jpg

 

 

Five days later, the remainder of the first flush from the manure compost tray has been harvested, and the first flush from the supplemented coir tray is ready for harvest:

 

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 43 55 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 44 06 AM.jpg

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Photo 2019-06-24, 10 44 34 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 51 57 AM.jpg

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Photo 2019-06-24, 10 52 56 AM.jpg

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Photo 2019-06-24, 10 53 56 AM.jpg

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Photo 2019-06-24, 10 56 27 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 56 39 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 57 08 AM.jpg

 

 

The larger specimen in the middle of this image was chosen as a clone:

 

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 55 58 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 10 56 18 AM.jpg

Photo 2019-06-24, 11 17 12 AM.jpg

 

 

About a third of the underdeveloped fruits were left to mature for a few more days.

 

Total first flush yield from the manure compost substrate: 5.5g dry.

Total first flush yield from the supplemented coir substrate: 12g dry.

 

Obviously the coir substrate beat out the compost by a long shot. It's nice to know that these will grow very happily on a non-manure-based substrate.

 

I highly recommend trying these fresh. 25 fresh grams does the trick. It is unlike any other mushroom I've had the pleasure to eat.

 

PS: Sorry about all the sideways photos. If an admin has the power to fix those I'd be most grateful!


Edited by DonShadow, 26 June 2019 - 12:50 AM.

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#2 CatsAndBats

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 08:29 PM

Jesus Christ dude, nice grow/s!


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#3 jkdeth

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 08:36 PM

Nice grow and professionally documented!
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#4 Phish

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 09:55 PM

Beautiful write up Don .Thanks. And a great grow also.

#5 DonShadow

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 01:01 AM

Thanks all. I'm happy to share what worked well for me. I'm sure having a decent clone didn't hurt, but it's clear which substrate is better for this species, which is absolutely worth every bit of energy and patience invested in growing it.


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#6 peacefrog

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 02:02 AM

Killing it my friend! Nicely done and very well documented.

This should help many folks out there trying to get into the particular species. And you all should lol. It’s a great and powerful species for sure!

Good vibes.
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#7 deepblueseawhale

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 05:07 AM

Great experiment, thank you for sharing.

 

Would you mind saying a few more words on your qualitative experience of this particular mushroom? It seems many regard it as one of the best for serious "medicine work".


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#8 Moonless

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:04 AM

Congratulations! Thank you for running the experiment for all of us, and teaching how to grow samperviva on the way!



#9 coorsmikey

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:11 AM

If you are done chatting here DonShadow, I would like to move this this to the Vaults?


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#10 Samwise

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 11:54 AM

What a fantastic post! Great work Don Shadow, you're a true credit to the myco-growing community...I have some coir, and definitely plan on emulating your substrate mix for my next batch of bulk substrate for my own P. hoogshagenii 'Semperviva', so this post is well timed...I'm very much looking forward to getting personally acquainted with this species..  :smile:



#11 CatsAndBats

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 12:16 PM

Thanks all. I'm happy to share what worked well for me. I'm sure having a decent clone didn't hurt, but it's clear which substrate is better for this species, which is absolutely worth every bit of energy and patience invested in growing it.

 

Supplemented coir recipe questions:

 

So your total h2o was 2300ml?

 

And the other ingredients are represented in milliliters, that converts to grams equally, correct?



#12 DonShadow

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 12:37 PM

Thanks all. I'm happy to share what worked well for me. I'm sure having a decent clone didn't hurt, but it's clear which substrate is better for this species, which is absolutely worth every bit of energy and patience invested in growing it.

Supplemented coir recipe questions:

So your total h2o was 2300ml?

And the other ingredients are represented in milliliters, that converts to grams equally, correct?
The total H20 is roughly 1300ml for each substrate, but start by boiling 1000ml to hydrate the coir and add more later as needed once the remaining ingredients have been mixed in well. I think about half the substrate from each recipe was used per tray. Everything but the coir (which was weighed dry) was simply measured using a small measuring cup. I believe 25ml = 1tbsp. A gram of water is 1ml but not a gram of oat bran etc. I used volume to make it easy, and these measures are by no means rigid.

Yet another plus is that this species tolerates very low temperature. Over the winter it continued to grow in my room when the temperature dropped down to 65F. I also had a tray of mexicana going at the same time, but it wouldn't fruit at that low temperature.

I find the semperviva, like mexicana, is easy on the body and very lucid, lacking any weird noise or darkness. My experiences with it have been profoundly deep, and it has a kind of force or energy that seems to direct my thoughts in a very specific way. It will be difficult to explain this without giving precise examples from individual experiences, so for now I'll just say that at this stage in my work with mushrooms, it feels like they almost always provide highly specific insights that relate directly to the ongoing narrative of my lived experience. I have found this to be especially true of the semperviva in my dealings with it over the last three months.

Also, when eaten fresh, I've found the visions to be so strong as to be a little overwhelming at times, even with eyes focused and wide open. Buckle up!

Edited by DonShadow, 26 June 2019 - 04:00 PM.

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