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3D Printed Fan and Filter Manfold


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#1 Thacan

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 10:02 PM

This is a HEPA filter manifold that I designed and printed recently which bolts to an 80mm standard computer fan.  It's designed to be used on a glove box and a FC.  Just to clean up the polyfill plugs I also designed and printed some wall filter caps.  I may not be a mad scientist just yet, but I can still over engineer with the best of them.

 

 

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  • FanFilterManifold.jpg
  • polyfillCap.JPG

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#2 Thirdeyeplants

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 06:01 AM

Thats pretty cool, nice work...
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#3 joeya

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 12:07 PM

While that's really cool stuff, it's pretty unlikely that a computer fan would be able to push air through a real HEPA filter. They are intended to move air around in a low resistance environment. The resistance of a HEPA filter really calls for a squirrel cage style fan. It's cool you have access to such technology, you will certainly find many uses for it in your grow room!


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#4 Thacan

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 12:22 PM

While that's really cool stuff, it's pretty unlikely that a computer fan would be able to push air through a real HEPA filter. They are intended to move air around in a low resistance environment. The resistance of a HEPA filter really calls for a squirrel cage style fan. It's cool you have access to such technology, you will certainly find many uses for it in your grow room!

 

I was really concerned about the same thing as you mentioned, but a 28 CFM fan seems to work well for the FC.  The flow rate is much lower than 28 CFM of course and just the right amount of flow to purge the FC every couple of hours for 15 minutes (running on a timer).  Running a humidifier on control to fully automate the FC seems like the way to go.  I am going to jump up to a 50 CFM fan for the glove box, but haven't tried it yet.  The trick to the glove box will be to control the flow so that it's not blowing stuff all over the place so I may have to do some internal baffles.  The filters where just over $1 each (Keela 12 pack HEPA Filter filters for iRobot Roomba 800 900).  Fans and power supplies are cheep as well.


Edited by Thacan, 15 July 2019 - 12:22 PM.


#5 joeya

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 01:32 PM

for my glove box, I did just the opposite. I put a port on it to mate with my Dyson vacuum cleaner at the top of one end, and a small HEPA filter siliconed onto the wall at the other end. This works great provided everything is sealed off, but I have trouble keeping my gloves sealed from one use to another. Things blow around a bit on start up, but settles out rather quickly. 



#6 Thacan

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 02:21 PM

for my glove box, I did just the opposite. I put a port on it to mate with my Dyson vacuum cleaner at the top of one end, and a small HEPA filter siliconed onto the wall at the other end. This works great provided everything is sealed off, but I have trouble keeping my gloves sealed from one use to another. Things blow around a bit on start up, but settles out rather quickly. 

 

I guess at least it provides a purge of the air space in the box, providing nothing else leaks in.  So you turn it on for the purge and then shut it off or are you saying that your glove box is negative pressure?   Interesting idea.



#7 joeya

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 02:34 PM

I leave it on and maintain negative pressure during use. Since the only way in for air is through the HEPA filter, it provides a stream of filtered air, just like it would if blown in. As you say, leakage is key, but even if there is a small leak, any particulate contamination coming in would be sucked right out, unless the breach was a large and significant one. 






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