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Rhizomorphic/fluffy


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#1 scotia

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 11:39 PM

Is rhizomorphic myc. a sign of heathier myc. or are there certain strains which produce rhizo. and certain strains that produce the fluffier type? Or does it just depend on conditions? Or is it random?

#2 epilectric

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 08:43 AM

i actually have no idea but i think it depends on the strain
i saw fluffy mycelium with most preprepared cubensis growkits (mm.org)
only exception was the amazonian strain (which is only available as spore syringe/print)
i think all of the woodchip inhabitors (panaeolus cyanescens, psilocybe azurescens) have rhizomorphic mycelium

#3 srgtm1a

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 09:55 AM

There are two types of mycelium growth: rhizomorphic, and tomentose. both types are present in every mushroom grow, regardless of strain, species, etc.

Rhizomorphic mycelium is typically where the fruits will pop up from....this is why you always hear the word strong associated with rhizomorphic mycelium.

some substrains that germinate will start off with weak, fluffy, tomentose mycelium growth, but will eventually start to grow rhizomorphic mycelium in generations to come.

This is why people do agar work as well....mainly to separate the strong rhizomorphic growth from the weaker growth, this is called sectoring. This tends to speed up the process of getting a strong rhizomorphic substrain.

you will get the same results eventually if you grow directly from a print, and continue to grow further generations of those.

for example...you get a print, you grow it out, the mycelium is weak, you then take prints of those fruits and do another grow and repeat. eventually you will see much more rhizomorphic growth as time goes on. An agar sectioning speeds this process up.

There is nothing wrong whatsoever if you have rhizomorphic, or tomentose mycelium, pefectly normal....this will not affect potency of your fruits. The only real difference is.

1. rhizomorphic mycelium will colonize at a much faster rate

2. you will have a bigger flush with more rhizomorphic growth.

so of course it is better to have rhizomorphic mycelium, but not the end of the world if you don't.
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#4 Hippie3

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 10:01 AM

thx, srgtm1a
i added that to our glossary
:bow:

#5 srgtm1a

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 10:39 AM

Pictures always help, so I have a few. I've posted these here before, but a perfect example of rhizomorphic and tomentose mycelium growing side by side. These were grown from a wild print of king stropharia, no agar work done. All in the same tray.


Tomentose mycelium growing in the center:

untitled.JPG


Toward the walls of the tray, Rhizomorphic mycelium:

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#6 regmilley

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 10:56 AM

Seems like the tomentose could easily bee confused with cobweb mould. Or is there always a distinct colour difference (greyer for the contam)? Good pics srgtm1a !

#7 srgtm1a

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 11:11 AM

It very often is confused with cobweb mold, especially when it grows in the dry verm layer of BRF jars. A good amount of the "is this a contam" posts i've seen are tomentose mycelium growth.

There is a difference....cobweb tends to have a grayish hue to it....but in weaker strands of mycelium, it isn't always easy to tell if you are seeing Gray or if you are seeing white. Coupled with lighting, your mind can play tricks on you...which leads to the "is this contam" post.

The one thing that will really separate the two, is that cobweb will grow like wildfire, often doubling and tripling its growth within a day, making it more apparent, as well as growing in long hairlike strands.
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#8 ExecutionStyle

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 11:48 AM

It very often is confused with cobweb mold, especially when it grows in the dry verm layer of BRF jars. A good amount of the "is this a contam" posts i've seen are tomentose mycelium growth.

There is a difference....cobweb tends to have a grayish hue to it....but in weaker strands of mycelium, it isn't always easy to tell if you are seeing Gray or if you are seeing white. Coupled with lighting, your mind can play tricks on you...which leads to the "is this contam" post.

The one thing that will really separate the two, is that cobweb will grow like wildfire, often doubling and tripling its growth within a day, making it more apparent, as well as growing in long hairlike strands.


You just saved me from posting another "is this contam" post. I had been debating if my jars had cobweb the last couple of days. I'm sure now that it was just a combination of lighting and madness that drove me to the speculation.

Thanks for sharing the knowledge, :bow:

#9 Lazlo

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 11:49 AM

For cubensis, I prefer the rhizomorphic growth that's nice and thick. With the limited Panaeolus experience I have, the tomentose growth that is nice and thick with mycelium is best. Check this Pan Fl. clone in seed out for instance.

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1157216204

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#10 Hippie3

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 11:59 AM

good info
linked to glossary entries

#11 srgtm1a

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 11:59 AM

Forgot to add.

Scotia - very good question and post!

#12 scotia

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 01:26 PM

Forgot to add.

Scotia - very good question and post!


Thanks, srgtm1a. It's been a question that's been playing on my mind a lot like this one. Although I've grown a few times, I think these are the contradictory questions that newbs can benefit from because I know I was confused by them, and actually, still was until recently.
Thanks for the insight, time and thought, srgtm1a.

#13 tbonus

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 03:20 PM

very useful info here guys,thanks!




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