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Questions about growing Cubensis / Cyanescens outside, in the UK.


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#1 pitchforkmonty

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 01:41 PM

In April of next year I plan to set up an outdoor patch in the South of the UK and had a few questions about the process, so any advice or answers would be greatly appreciated.

 

I've heard Cubensis would be easier to cultivate compared to Cyanescens, yet the latter can grow naturally in the UK and seem to be more suited to the generally colder / wetter climate of the UK. What would you reccomend I grow, keeping in mind the climate and my experience?

 

Would April be the best time to set up a patch? If I was successful I'd be aiming for multiple fruits throughout the year and for it to survive through winter, to hopefully fruit the next year. I've been given mixed reccomendations about what time of year to set it up, with some telling me September and others telling me March - April. Would the type of mushroom I'd grow impact what time of year I should set it up at?

 

I've been reccomended to water the patch periodically until fruiting, if my area doesn't experience any rain at the time I'd set up the patch. How much water should I be providing to the patch if there isn't much rain, and would the amount of water I'd need to provide change, depending on the type of mushroom?

 

Looking forward to hearing your guys' input and start learning more about the process. Cheers !

 

 

 

 

 



#2 ItBeBasidia

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 04:09 PM

Hey m8,

Cyans are very common in the UK. In fact, when I was living in Suffolk, I had better luck with finding Cyans then libs. Libs are limited really to the North(peak district, lake district, Yorkshire, etc.), high elevations (Dartmoor),and moors (not heaths).

Now cyans however, you have a good chance of of making a find in the wood mulch at your local Tesco. The time of year is October sometimes all the way up til January.

This has to deal with cultivation because it would be easiest to transplant colonised woodchips from a patch you find to one you create.

The Ideal time for laying a patch is spring if you are hoping for fruits that fall. March or April is fine. For spawn, it doesn't matter you can create that year round. As for watering, you want to make sure the chips are moist and dont dry out. A good Idea is to put soaked cardboard or plastic over top of the patch and periodically check and make sure its not dry. You could even put soil and plant things over top and they'll push up when temps drop. I've seen patches where nothing was put up top and just the top few inches dried but the mycelium stayed alive where it was moist and still produced.

If you are just beginning to cultivate, cubes are the way to go. They'll teach you much about the lifecycle and habits of fungi and are very easy. Not to mention you will get more in a shorter period of time and can grow year round.

My opinion is to do both! Dive right in and mess up, have success, and learn. Get a cyan patch and cubes started. Also, take up foraging. It is very fun and exhilarating to go out and make some finds. Libs and Cyans are very easy to identify.

Cheers

#3 pitchforkmonty

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 05:35 PM

Also, take up foraging. It is very fun and exhilarating to go out and make some finds. Libs and Cyans are very easy to identify.

Cheers

 

Great advice mate. Looks like I'll try growing both, but from what you've said Cubes seem to be more reliable and will provide more shrooms! Been doing loads of foraging recently as theres been a lot of rain in the area of the UK I live in. Its whats given me most of my very limited shroom knowledge, going out there - foraging whatever I can find and then IDing it when I get home. Its fucking great fun. I know a couple spots where I've been told I can find Semilanceata, but I'm moving to Snowdonia in a month - so I'm going to pick libs until my hands are bleeding I think!

 

From my understanding, cubes don't occur naturally in the UK but the conditions it needs could probably be met all year round, using boiled straw / hay or other materials to stack ontop of the patch to combat wind, frost and lower temps. With enough attention could it fruit ALL year round, or is that an unreasonable target to set? Furthermore, what precautions could I take to ensure the patch survived the winter so that it could fruit the next year?

 

Cheers man, awesome advice.



#4 ItBeBasidia

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 08:27 PM

Also, take up foraging. It is very fun and exhilarating to go out and make some finds. Libs and Cyans are very easy to identify.

Cheers

Great advice mate. Looks like I'll try growing both, but from what you've said Cubes seem to be more reliable and will provide more shrooms! Been doing loads of foraging recently as theres been a lot of rain in the area of the UK I live in. Its whats given me most of my very limited shroom knowledge, going out there - foraging whatever I can find and then IDing it when I get home. Its fucking great fun. I know a couple spots where I've been told I can find Semilanceata, but I'm moving to Snowdonia in a month - so I'm going to pick libs until my hands are bleeding I think!

From my understanding, cubes don't occur naturally in the UK but the conditions it needs could probably be met all year round, using boiled straw / hay or other materials to stack ontop of the patch to combat wind, frost and lower temps. With enough attention could it fruit ALL year round, or is that an unreasonable target to set? Furthermore, what precautions could I take to ensure the patch survived the winter so that it could fruit the next year?
Ohhh you're in for some nice hauls in Snowdonia!

Correct on Cubes not occurring naturally in the UK. Growing cubes will have to be done indoors for the most part. An outdoor patch could work in the summer but it most likely will not survive the winter. I suppose in theory, if you found a way to keep it warm, it could work. you'd have to constantly supply some substrate though because cubes like to colonise then exhaust their subs, fruit, and start over.

If you stacked materials on top of a cyan patch to keep it at fruiting temp, you might get it to fruit until the spring or when temps rise over 16 C. That would be an excellent experiment. I haven't seen that done yet.



The best way to start with cubes is the PF tek. Mycotopia has wonderful resources for starting up with cubes check out this thread. https://r.tapatalk.c...51&share_type=t

Edited by ItBeBasidia, 12 August 2019 - 08:36 PM.


#5 pitchforkmonty

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 06:42 AM

Nice - a Cyan patch would be cool! I'd be able to visit the spot regularly and stack hay / plant matter / debris on top to insulate the patch, but indoor box grows seem to be simpler and with better rewards. Me and a friend are going to work on an indoor tub grow until we get the patch up and going, cheers for the advice dude.






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