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Recovering from a dub tub developing mold


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#1 Tomfa

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 01:33 PM

A few days ago, I cased 2 GT and 2 pe, per 6 qt. Dub Tub instructions. At that time, I also relocated my 4 tubs to my basement. I live in northern NE, near the Canadian border, and I tell you this to explain that most basements here have high humidity, and cool Temps, an average of 68 degrees. That's all great, but, basements also have a slight musty smell. So, I think the musty smell equals mold spores on a higher concentration than we would normally see. Today, I put my remaining 3 dub tubs within a larger tub, and installed a hepa/humidity filter, to push in fresh humid air. I probably over did it, so, I'm looking for advice and comments for my next set of tubs, that will be ready in about 12 days.

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#2 joeya

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 02:45 PM

I used to live in Northern NE and am familiar with the moldy basement scenario. It will certainly reduce the number of flushes you can expect to get, but if you are careful you will get at least one good one per grow. Overkill is a requirement there to get any more than that. 


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#3 Tomfa

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:04 PM

I'm curious as to why I would have less flushes? As I tell folks, I'm in diapers and just learning to crawl. Of course when I tell my adult children that, they get a good laugh and tell me I was probably close to needing diapers anyway. Rotten shits, aren't they?

#4 LegoMyego

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:09 PM

I assume he meant you'd get less flushes due to the tub developing contams overtime due to the spores in your basement. 

 

I doubt you have anything to worry about though unless it is extreme.  You should get at least two flushes.  Just keep trucking until it doesn't produce anymore or until you notice signs of contam (especially green/black spots).  You want to get rid of tams as quickly as possible so it doesn't spread to the other tubs.  


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#5 Tomfa

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:41 PM

Yes, it broke my heart to dump that tub in the woods, but 5 seconds after I saw the mold, I was outside, tub in hand. When I dumped it though, I put the contaminated part in one area, and put the rest (the part not yet showing mold) in another area. I figure that maybe a few GT will still pop up, out in mother nature. I have to say, even with a bit of heartache from tam, I'm thoroughly enjoying this, and I'm having fun learning, albeit slowly.

#6 joeya

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:51 PM

As LME said, I meant less flushes before contamination set in. I had mold everywhere in my basement there, I even remember seeing a flush of some kind of mushroom growing from the wood around the laundry chute  in the basement ceiling.  In that environment, contamination is inevitable, if you can get a flush before it sets in, you're doing well. 


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#7 Tomfa

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 08:14 AM

The latest update is, as expected. 2 more tubs developed green mold, leaving one clean tub, with strong mycelium growth, and no sign of mold. Even though I put up a plastic, closet sized area in the basement, it was too late for those tubs. I've decided to make a clean room in a closet on the first floor for my next set of dub tubs. I won't bring up the last healthy looking tub for fear of hidden mold, yet to rear its ugly head. So, lesson learned, stay out of the basement or risk having the wrong type of green thumb, plus, I won't case GT. I'm not sure about PE though, and if I should case that. I hope someone will give me advice on that. I also learned to stay away from h2o2, although, the only reason I was using it was because of the tubs being in the basement in the first place. I might have been a little discouraged, but it's all in how it's looked at. I learned a few things and will put that experience to good use.

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#8 PJammer24

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:06 AM

The latest update is, as expected. 2 more tubs developed green mold, leaving one clean tub, with strong mycelium growth, and no sign of mold. Even though I put up a plastic, closet sized area in the basement, it was too late for those tubs. I've decided to make a clean room in a closet on the first floor for my next set of dub tubs. I won't bring up the last healthy looking tub for fear of hidden mold, yet to rear its ugly head. So, lesson learned, stay out of the basement or risk having the wrong type of green thumb, plus, I won't case GT. I'm not sure about PE though, and if I should case that. I hope someone will give me advice on that. I also learned to stay away from h2o2, although, the only reason I was using it was because of the tubs being in the basement in the first place. I might have been a little discouraged, but it's all in how it's looked at. I learned a few things and will put that experience to good use.

 

Are you sure this was 100% due to the basement? Have you had successful grows on the upper levels of your home in the past?

 

When I am having contamination issues, I often look at my pasteurization process... I am having some now actually, where my contams are less than the size of a pencil eraser... I hate throwing out bags for such a tiny little spot, especially when they are flushing awesome...


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#9 Tomfa

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:22 AM

I pc'd everything I was supposed to, even the casing for the penis envy tubs. I doubt anyone can, with certainty say one particular thing caused contamination, but, the most obvious for us is our basement. We have a clean room, however it's on our first floor, and too warm for fruiting, hence the basement. We still have one tub left out of the four, and that's still doing well. 1 out of 4 isn't what I hoped, but it is what it is, right?

#10 PJammer24

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 11:40 AM

I had sudden and serious contamination issues that began recently after 6 months of nearly contamination free growing. It corresponds with my being on the road a ton and having my buddy take care of things for me. I think part of the problem is the time of year with late summer being the top time for mold spores. I think the other aspects are that I simply have been lazy when home and not cleaning and his inexperience.

 

I am in the middle of a deep clean right now. I am bombing the basement with lab grade bombs and have professional mold remediation products.

 

I will be doing a deep clean of the house over the next week in the remaining rooms.

 

While I am sure that this deep clean will be helpful, I think that my buddy's use of substrate prior to being at field capacity (still too wet) has played a role. He has also used the substrate while still at 90-100 degrees but since the myc has grown well for the most part, I don't know that temperature has been an issue. The bags fully colonize prior to my finding a tiny spot of green or green/blue somewhere on the block. I can't find anything on the potential for increased mold growth on overly hydrated substrate. It is a thing for bacteria but is this also a thing for trichoderma? I have not looked very hard to be honest....

 

Sorry to jack the thread but I thought that a response to this may be helpful for you as well...


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#11 Tomfa

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:26 PM

Thanks pj, and I like the idea of bombing my basement, although, in a different manner. Sorry about your present experience though. I still have the traditional brf cakes that seem to be fine, so, I think, with fall and winter getting closer, I will keep everything upstairs. My lovely wife used bleached mixed warm water to clean the walls in our spare room and closet today and I'll scrub the floor tomorrow, and we will attempt another grain grow. We will spray lysol in the room prior to any work we do, and be gloved and masked, and just pay close attention to being mindful with each step in the process. We have some Agar, plus 1 more spore syringe of GT, and we will use the syringe to noc the grain, but I also want to try to make some liquid culture with a bit of the Agar that we have in the frig. That will be a new thing to try, and I understand it can also be difficult. I hope I can seek help with you folks.

#12 PJammer24

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 12:24 PM

Thanks pj, and I like the idea of bombing my basement, although, in a different manner. Sorry about your present experience though. I still have the traditional brf cakes that seem to be fine, so, I think, with fall and winter getting closer, I will keep everything upstairs. My lovely wife used bleached mixed warm water to clean the walls in our spare room and closet today and I'll scrub the floor tomorrow, and we will attempt another grain grow. We will spray lysol in the room prior to any work we do, and be gloved and masked, and just pay close attention to being mindful with each step in the process. We have some Agar, plus 1 more spore syringe of GT, and we will use the syringe to noc the grain, but I also want to try to make some liquid culture with a bit of the Agar that we have in the frig. That will be a new thing to try, and I understand it can also be difficult. I hope I can seek help with you folks.

 

 

Don't use Lysol... Lysol doesn't kill mold spores. It is a chemical concoction and it will lead to mutations in the mushrooms if exposed... I used Lysol when I first got started, I think a lot of people do, but it is not the best route to take... I would just spray a concentrated bleach mixture in the area around it if anything at all. Cut all of the fans or AC units 30-40 minutes prior to working so the particulates in the air (spores) settle and are not settling right into what you are working on. In the winter, I will often cut the forced-air heat prior to starting my work so the air in the room isn't in motion... I really miss having hot water heat... In my opinion, hot water heat is the bees knees for a mushroom house....

 

I need to get a new furnace before it gets cold... It would not be cost effective to put in a boiler and retrofit the house so I have been pricing HEPA units, Ion generating units, and potentially filters that are not HEPA... My understanding is that true HEPA filters may provide too much resistance for use in the intake of a forced-air system but that there are some effective filters with an appropriate MERV rating... I haven't decided what I am going to do yet. Even installing a bipolar-ion generator would be helpful... If all of the spores and other particulates are falling to the floor due to the generated atoms binding with them, it is easy enough to clean the floors to eliminate the treat...

 

Any suggestions you guys can make from possible experience with getting the most out of a forced-air filtration system would be greatly appreciated!! No matter what I decide, I will continue running the room sized HEPA filters throughout the house... I currently have 2 x germ guardian units that I move around the living space as well as one of the largest Honeywell units... I have 2 more Honeywell units running in the work/fruiting space... I would really like to get as near clean room conditions as possible at some point and in the mean time would like to do the best I can with what's available... I have been planning a build-out in the basement that would make a positive pressure fruiting room possible with dedicated HEPA filtration system but time and money only allow for so much so fast...


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#13 TVCasualty

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 12:45 PM

Make a bunch of this stuff and spray every surface of your basement with it (it is almost miraculous in its effectiveness at inhibiting mold):

 

 

DIY Mold Control/Prevention Spray
 
To 1 quart of hot water add:
 
(1) Tablespoon of baking soda

(1) Tablespoon of washing soda (sodium carbonate) [I sometimes use Oxy-Clean for this part; seems to work just as well as it's mostly sodium  carbonate]

(2) Tablespoons of TSP (trisodium phosphate; cleaner found in hardware stores in paint section; get the actual powder, NOT "TSP Substitute")
 
Add the dry chemicals to the water and shake the hell out of it (vent the slight pressure build up a couple of times while shaking it if using a bottle), put it in a sprayer, and apply. Wear gloves and eye protection;  don't get it on your skin (it's irritating) or in your eyes! It's safe to touch treated surfaces when they've dried.

 

If using it in a confined space, wear a respirator as breathing the vapor is irritating, too.
 
I use a 2-gallon garden sprayer with the nozzle set to a fine mist to apply it so I just multiply the formula X 4 to make a gallon and mix it directly in the sprayer (no need to vent since I'd have to pressurize it anyway).
 
I found the above formula while searching online for the MSDS/original Patent of Concrobium and found a blog where a research chemist had already reverse-engineered it, saving me the trouble (and a lot of money! It costs around $2/gallon if you mix it yourself or $35/gallon for the retail version).
 

_______________

 

Also, installing a UV sterilizer light in your HVAC system is a great idea even if you're not growing fungi and it helped to greatly reduce my contamination problems in old moldy houses.

_______________

 

 

PJammer24: You're correct that you can't just add a HEPA filter to your HVAC system as it would have way too much backpressure. You would have to install a bypass filtration system, which would give you true-HEPA filtration for your whole house but the up-front cost is high and it's not something anyone would do in a rental (I don't know if you own or rent).

 

But in either case you can still install a UV light in the duct (and remove it when you move, if desired). They are best installed directly downstream of the A/C evaporator as that's where condensation gathers when using the A/C. And of course DO NOT EVER look at a UV-C bulb when it is on!

 

Get a strong one that uses at least two 12 watt bulbs (try to find a unit that uses commonly-available bulbs; check on that first since lights with weird wattages are out there and can be cheaper than others but then you pay a lot more in the long run with harder-to-find and more expensive bulbs. Make sure to change them annually or it won' be of much help.


Edited by TVCasualty, 11 September 2019 - 12:52 PM.


#14 Tomfa

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 04:24 PM

Jezzz, I feel like a poor man when ya'll talk about hvac, or any kind of air conditioning.... Lol, where I live, we actually don't need air conditioners. We might have 1 week of uncomfortable weather. Hell, our leaves started changing color the end of friggin August. Lord, I miss Asia. I agree PJ, hot water baseboard is nice, and what I use, and compliment it with wood stove. To answer someone else's questions on successful grows on the main floor of our home, the answer is yes, we have had success. I also took care of the mold issue in the basement. I opened all the windows and did a good cleaning, but we also have a 7 by 8 alcove in the basement, and we hund heavy plastic sheets up, double it with a shhet in between for walking through, so it is always protected. It apparently worked, as we just harvested our first flush. Another thing I did differently, is that I didn't case them, nor ever put them in the dark after mixing with substrate. Everything went good, except I think we misted a bit too often, and will cut back on the next new crop.
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#15 PJammer24

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:43 AM

Make a bunch of this stuff and spray every surface of your basement with it (it is almost miraculous in its effectiveness at inhibiting mold):

 

 

DIY Mold Control/Prevention Spray
 
To 1 quart of hot water add:
 
(1) Tablespoon of baking soda

(1) Tablespoon of washing soda (sodium carbonate) [I sometimes use Oxy-Clean for this part; seems to work just as well as it's mostly sodium  carbonate]

(2) Tablespoons of TSP (trisodium phosphate; cleaner found in hardware stores in paint section; get the actual powder, NOT "TSP Substitute")
 
Add the dry chemicals to the water and shake the hell out of it (vent the slight pressure build up a couple of times while shaking it if using a bottle), put it in a sprayer, and apply. Wear gloves and eye protection;  don't get it on your skin (it's irritating) or in your eyes! It's safe to touch treated surfaces when they've dried.

 

If using it in a confined space, wear a respirator as breathing the vapor is irritating, too.
 
I use a 2-gallon garden sprayer with the nozzle set to a fine mist to apply it so I just multiply the formula X 4 to make a gallon and mix it directly in the sprayer (no need to vent since I'd have to pressurize it anyway).
 
I found the above formula while searching online for the MSDS/original Patent of Concrobium and found a blog where a research chemist had already reverse-engineered it, saving me the trouble (and a lot of money! It costs around $2/gallon if you mix it yourself or $35/gallon for the retail version).
 

_______________

 

Also, installing a UV sterilizer light in your HVAC system is a great idea even if you're not growing fungi and it helped to greatly reduce my contamination problems in old moldy houses.

_______________

 

 

PJammer24: You're correct that you can't just add a HEPA filter to your HVAC system as it would have way too much backpressure. You would have to install a bypass filtration system, which would give you true-HEPA filtration for your whole house but the up-front cost is high and it's not something anyone would do in a rental (I don't know if you own or rent).

 

But in either case you can still install a UV light in the duct (and remove it when you move, if desired). They are best installed directly downstream of the A/C evaporator as that's where condensation gathers when using the A/C. And of course DO NOT EVER look at a UV-C bulb when it is on!

 

Get a strong one that uses at least two 12 watt bulbs (try to find a unit that uses commonly-available bulbs; check on that first since lights with weird wattages are out there and can be cheaper than others but then you pay a lot more in the long run with harder-to-find and more expensive bulbs. Make sure to change them annually or it won' be of much help.

 

I recently moved back into a house I had been using as a rental property. I own it. The tenants trashed it so I am currently renovating. I will be putting in a new furnace which is why I am looking into whole house HEPA systems. There are 5 floor units scrubbing the air now but I would like to take it a step further. I have also been considering a bi-polar ion generator. If I can get the spores and other particulates the drop out of the air to the floor more readily, it is easy enough to clean the floors sporadically. I just got an estimate for new flooring throughout 90% of the house. I am putting down LVT throughout, it really looks like wood which I like. The LVT is easily cleaned, waterproof, and scratch (pet) resistant. I also looked at other tiles like the porcelain that looks like wood but I would eventually drop something heavy and have the hassle of replacing tiles. I am super excited about my new flooring!!

 

The basement is concrete block with concrete flooring and I would like to finish approximately half of the 1,200 square foot space with a fruiting room and work space that has dedicated HVAC and positive pressure. I recently signed a gas lease that should fund my renovations. The flooring was purchased with my signing bonus. The only problem with the basement is that occasional a bit of moisture seeps throughout he concrete block despite my installing a french drain around the home's perimeter.. The water coming through is minimal and I bleach that corner often so i don't think its too big a concern but it is super annoying considering I spent the money for a french drain which isn't fully functional. I will probably put some type of vinyl down there at some point also.

 

I love being back in my little country abode! I am surrounded by field corn and soy fields, I sit on the 2nd highest hill in the municipality, and my house sits 200+ yards from the road... As my buddy Country says, "Well, you went and said fuck ALL then neighbors with your home choice"... LMFAO... fuck having neighbors! Neighbors are totally overrated... Unless my neighbor was ODD, my OMC crush is always welcome to move in next door... I'll trade manure for edibles anytime!!


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