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Questions and Input wanted


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#1 SacredMountain

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 11:55 PM

For stealth & out of the way reasons I plan to perform my 1st grow in basement (walkout basement with more than half of the perimeter NOT underground).

I plan to turn a wooden workbench into a grow tent of sorts. Wooden framed, plastic wrapped (black) walls and top will mount on top of bench. Bench top is large enough for 10 shoe box dub tubs.  It will begin to get cooler where I am at soon (zone 7a).  I can pretty easily spawn my grain jars upstairs (above fridge in cabinets and get 75-80 deg) but will need to move downstairs when I move to the tubs.  If I place tubs on an elevated rack above a pan of water that is on a temp regulated, heated grow mat inside of this plastic squared space, will it produce enough heat and also help humidity level (even though the tubs take care of that)?  Seems like it would be very similar to a submersible tank heater (rather not have to buy this if possible). Perhaps the mat alone as long as its at least 4" below the tub bottoms?

Bottom line, I will need to get the temps up occasionally down there in the coming months during this grow. I expect ambient air temps of 62-75 down there over the next few months but it could vary. Thoughts? 



#2 Misfit

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 12:04 AM

Heat mats seem to cause more problems than they are worth from what I have seen. I’ll let someone with experience chime in though. Just going off what I have read.
A space heater set on a thermostat may be a better solution if it’s possible.
Edit: disregard. I missed a key part of this post while skimming it. My bad.


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Edited by Misfit, 09 September 2019 - 12:06 AM.

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#3 crazy1

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 09:26 AM

Sounds like a good plan. The only thing I see being a problem possibly is the open water pan you’ll be using for you humidity. That, with the added heat mat could be a breeding ground for contams.
In this stealth system, will you have time to mist them?
It is a much better idea.

Peace
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#4 SacredMountain

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 12:36 PM

Sounds like a good plan. The only thing I see being a problem possibly is the open water pan you’ll be using for you humidity. That, with the added heat mat could be a breeding ground for contams.
In this stealth system, will you have time to mist them?
It is a much better idea.

Peace

 

crazy1: Time to mist should not be an issue. Perhaps just use the germination mat inside the grow area to increase temp but do not touch the tubs at all?

How often are the 6QT (roughly) tubs in need of misting? 3xday?



#5 Misfit

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 10:01 PM

You don’t have to mist tubs


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#6 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 03:41 PM

Wooden framed, plastic wrapped (black) walls and top will mount on top of bench.

 

 

 

Be careful with plastic sheeting on the interior of exterior-facing walls. It works fine only so long as the temperature inside the room is higher than the temperature outside.

 

Heat pushes moisture from warmer areas toward cooler areas. When it's warm outside and water vapor is being pushed into your cooler house, it will be stopped by your vapor barrier (the plastic). It will then gather there as condensation. Not long after that it will support a staggering mold outbreak that will require the tearing-out and replacement of any drywall involved or a very deep cleaning of any masonry affected.

 

Guess how I learned that...

 

Works fine in Winter when you're heating the room and it's cold outside, though. Just don't forget to remove it when it warms up outside (which may mean growing there will have to be a seasonal thing).


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#7 KapnDank

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 05:02 PM

I would also make sure the high humidity didn't come in contact with the wood frame. Damp wood will mold pretty easily
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#8 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 05:59 PM



I would also make sure the high humidity didn't come in contact with the wood frame. Damp wood will mold pretty easily

 

 

I have a way to deal with mold on wood or any other surface that won't get washed that has proven to be one of the best things I've ever added to my anti-contamination arsenal: Reversed-engineered mold control spray!

 

Mix it up, spray it on, let dry. Mold will never grow there again unless it is physically washed off the surface. I started using this nearly ten years ago (and have posted the following recipe a few times) and the places I treated are still mold-free (in places where it would ordinarily grow).

 

Below is the reverse-engineered formula that goes into the commercial product sold at Home Depot known as Concrobium.

 

 

 

DIY Mold Control/Prevention Spray:

 

To 1 quart of hot water add:

 

1 Tablespoon of baking soda

1 Tablespoon of washing soda (sodium carbonate) [I sometimes use Oxy-Clean for this part; seems to work just as well as it's mostly sodium carbonate]

2 Tablespoons of TSP (trisodium phosphate; cleaner found in hardware stores in paint section; get the actual powder, NOT "TSP Substitute")

 

Add the dry chemicals to the water and shake the hell out of it (vent the slight pressure build up a couple of times while shaking it if using a bottle), put it in a sprayer, and apply. Wear gloves and eye protection;  don't get it on your skin (it's irritating) or in your eyes! It's safe to touch treated surfaces when they've dried.

 

I use a 2-gallon garden sprayer with the nozzle set to a fine mist to apply it so I just multiply the formula X 4 to make a gallon and mix it directly in the sprayer (no need to vent since I'd have to pressurize it anyway). 

 

I found the above formula while searching online for the MSDS/original Patent of Concrobium because that shit is ~98% water but sells for $35/gallon!

 

I found a blog where a research chemist had already reverse-engineered Concrobium because he was as appalled by the price as I was, saving me the trouble (and a lot of money! It costs around $2/gallon if you mix it yourself). The irony of their ridiculous pricing is that if it had been at least a little more reasonable I probably would never have bothered to look up the DIY version, so someone's greed benefited me in this case and it's benefiting others too since I've told a LOT of people about this.


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#9 KapnDank

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 06:13 PM

That's a solid idea. Adjust the pH to where nothing messes with it

#10 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 07:21 PM

From what I've read that mix works primarily through osmotic pressure, more like salt.

 

I'm not sure if pH would be a factor unless it was an aqueous solution. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't since in solid form there would be no ions present so the concept of pH would not apply.



#11 KapnDank

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 07:26 PM

Ah right on. I'm definitely no chemist.




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