Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Myceliated Grain TEK


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 November 2019 - 04:25 PM

MYCELIATED GRAIN TEK

 

It has been found that the mycelium of certain species of potent psilocybin-bearing mushrooms of the genus Psilocybe also produces considerable quantities of active material when cultivated on sterilized, edible grain media (or “grain-spawn”). The grain-spawn is inoculated and incubated in glass canning jars or polyurethane bags specially designed to tolerate sterilization temperatures. The resulting myceliated grain is then dehydrated and easily preserved long-term if properly stored. The whole dried kernels may be simmered in water to create a potent tea, or ground to create an easily digestible flour (depending on the particular grain used). The two species known with certainty to produce active compounds in sufficient quantity are Psilocybe caerulescens, and Psilocybe hoogshagenii/semperviva, though it's likely that many others may be found to be equally effective once further research has been conducted. Ps. zapotecorum and Ps. mexicana are worthy candidates for experimentation.

 

This method negates the need to fruit mushrooms, which can be costly, time-consuming and generally unfavorable to those without sufficient motivation or patience, particularly in the case of the lesser-known and temperamental psilocybin mushrooms such as Ps. caerulescens. The process is considerably simpler, less time consuming, and more discrete than fruiting mushrooms. It requires minimal equipment or expensive tools, and results in very high-quality material with little waste or environmental impact. Production requires little space, is easily scaled to suit the specific needs of the cultivator, and the quantity of inoculated material does not change the incubation time required for maximum potency. There is no need for a fruiting apparatus or incubator, and a flow-hood or glove-box is not required when a sterile liquid culture syringe is employed skillfully using filter lids fitted with self-healing injection ports. The creation of these lids requires a moderate level of patience and competency, but with tools readily obtained online or from a typical hardware store, dozens of durable, reusable lids may be created in a single afternoon. The lids are fastened on regular-mouthed or wide-mouthed glass canning jars, which serve as the final incubation vessels. Wide-mouthed jars are preferred for performing grain-to-grain inoculations. Once the grain has been inoculated, there is no need for further maintenance such as misting and fanning, so the grain jars or bags may be left unattended for extended periods of time without risk of failure.

 

The substrate (hydrated grain) must be sterilized to ensure that competitor fungi and bacteria are eliminated before inoculating with the desired fungi. A pressure-cooker/canner capable of reaching temperatures necessary for rapid full sterilization will greatly ease the process and virtually eliminate the possibility of contamination when pure starting media is used, and when aseptic technique is followed correctly. However, sterilization by means of a pressure-canner is not required. Alternatively, a somewhat more tedious but sufficiently effective process called “fractional sterilization” or “Tyndallization” may be employed. This involves the staged immersion of jars in boiling water/steam in intervals over the course of three days. All that is required for this sterilization technique is a large pot with a well-fitting lid.

 

Pure starting media is of critical importance for this method, as any contamination present in the master inoculant will be transmitted to the media that will ultimately be consumed. Fortunately, it is relatively easy to detect contamination on grain-spawn. Foul-smelling jars, or grain with visible signs of mold or bacteria should be discarded. Only grain with visibly healthy white mycelium and a typically “mushroomy” smell should be used, and only in the complete absence of doubt.

 

The three most common starting media are spore-prints (mushroom spores stored in a tin-foil envelope), liquid culture (mycelium suspended in liquid nutrient media stored in a sterile syringe), and agar culture (mycelium grown on seaweed gelatin and stored in a petri dish, sterile test-tube or plastic baggie). Liquid culture syringes are preferred for this TEK as they can be expanded without the need for a sterile environment (such as a flow-hood or glove-box). Filter lids with self-healing injection-ports permit the application of liquid culture in open air. Spores on the other hand must be transferred and “cleaned” on sterile agar media, which can only be performed in a sterile environment. Likewise, agar cultures can only be expanded (to agar or liquid culture) in sterile conditions. In this tutorial, various modes of preparing nutrient media will be described in detail.

 

It is warranted that at least a glove-box be created or obtained in order to permit the long-term storage and preservation of these rare and valuable species of fungi. Due to the legality and discrete nature of spore-prints, they will undoubtedly be the most common and sustainable mode of transferring the genetics through the mail (though a method for sending agar culture via standard lettermail will be described at the end of this manual). In order to sustain the demand for these rare fungi species, it will be necessary to fruit the mushrooms and obtain spore prints, therefore learning to cultivate the mushrooms themselves is strongly encouraged by the writers of this TEK. Ps. hoogshagenii/semperviva is quite simple to cultivate, and provides mushrooms of unparalleled quality.

 

Some useful links with information regarding the cultivation of Ps. hoogshagenii/semperviva are included on the last page of the attached manual.

 

Enjoy!

 

Photo 2019-08-15, 10 20 44 PM.jpg

 

Attached File  Graintek1.1(optimized).pdf   9.1MB   103 downloads


  • Samwise, bezevo, Cuboid and 8 others like this

#2 Moonless

Moonless

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 205 posts

Posted 06 November 2019 - 08:31 PM

DonShadow you are truly spectacular!

 

I loved how the writers included every step including the creation of filter lids and multiple methods of inoculating a liquid culture. Its just what I'm looking for as a beginner interested in cultivating the active mycelium species. Really good work on this one, your TEK style is really nice.


  • Samwise and DonShadow like this

#3 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2019 - 02:58 AM

My pleasure, I'm glad to share. Big thanks to everyone who contributed to the project :smile:


  • Samwise and Moonless like this

#4 Cuboid

Cuboid

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 629 posts

Posted 07 November 2019 - 06:23 AM

Top quality document there Don ! :) Fantastic work, thanks for all the time and effort you must have put into that. I particularly liked the clear detailed lid prep - I made lids with ships and filters before and they worked OK but no where near as neat as yours! next time I'll be following your procedure for sure.

 

Kind regards,

Cuboid.


  • DonShadow likes this

#5 bezevo

bezevo

    Mycotopiate

  • Gold VIP
  • 736 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2019 - 11:54 AM

i think a few people might want to explore Don's Idea /Myceliated Grain TEK to wards developing a reliable/consistent  enough dosing with it  to  use this for  the folks interested in Mycro Dosing also ?

  Maybe once some members do some research in this area and if its determined practical  for Mycro dosing,Perhaps  Don could maybe add another  future chapter to his great PDF  book , ? 

 

just an IDEA/challenge to all of you members interested in this area .

 

Another idea is it possible that adding supplemental nutrients and amino acids  like L-Tryptophan  or grains like

Quinoa or Kaniwa

might boost  potency with this /Myceliated Grain TEK just one more  area to explore ?

 

Great Work .DonSHADOW thanks

 

BEZ


Edited by bezevo, 07 November 2019 - 12:51 PM.


#6 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2019 - 01:23 PM

Just to be clear, I don’t consider this TEK in any way my discovery or my property. I merely consolidated preexisting information with my own data, and I had a lot of assistance with the editing process (thank-you editor!) This TEK is for everyone.

I tried to make it as simple as possible. There is a ton of room for experimentation and further expansion, so please experiment away and add anything you find to this thread if you’d like. Another member here has already pointed out that the mycelium of Panaeolus cyanescens was not potent enough to be of any use for this application, so check that one off the list.

Edited by DonShadow, 07 November 2019 - 01:24 PM.

  • Samwise, bezevo and Salem like this

#7 ElrikEriksson

ElrikEriksson

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 163 posts

Posted 07 November 2019 - 01:41 PM

Nice tek :smile:

It would be a good idea to go through and assay everything we grow to see what will work.

However, we should bear in mind that the cultural parameters they need for potency might be different than what we normally give spawn.

Perhaps someone with semperviva or caerulescens could do a trial in which jars are consolidated for 1 week, 1 month, and 4 months as well as perhaps hydrating the grain with half strength decaf coffee to trigger a survival mechanism in the culture, like with stone producers. Any findings from known actives could then be extended to the tests with potential actives.

It should also be recognized that within a species the potency of unmatured mycelium could have strong genetic influences. One failure shouldn't rule out a species usefulness.

 

Fun times :smile:


  • DonShadow likes this

#8 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2019 - 02:16 PM

I have tested several species of grain at 1, 2 and 3 months incubation time. Anecdotally I can say that 1 month was significantly weaker than 2, and 3 months felt more potent than 2 to me, though the difference was slight. Everything I’ve tested at 2 months was very potent. All of my experience is with Ps. semperviva, I have yet to test Ps. caerulescens but I will have the opportunity to do so very soon.
  • Samwise, Moonless, Asura and 1 other like this

#9 Asura

Asura

    Cyantist

  • OG VIP
  • 148 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2019 - 05:45 PM

Hey Don, I know I have already told you elsewhere, but great job.

 

As for the cyans, I know it was a failure but I am still going to try with a 2 month old bag. I did see blueing in my bag 

when I broke it up at 10 days or so.

 

Since I am most experienced with this species directly, my plan is to use it as a control for dosing purposes. If it works,

hopefully I'll get that part right because I really don't want to end up in the loony bin...it's really potent.



#10 Samwise

Samwise

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 111 posts

Posted 08 November 2019 - 08:33 AM

i think a few people might want to explore Don's Idea /Myceliated Grain TEK to wards developing a reliable/consistent  enough dosing with it  to  use this for  the folks interested in Mycro Dosing also ?

  Maybe once some members do some research in this area and if its determined practical  for Mycro dosing,Perhaps  Don could maybe add another  future chapter to his great PDF  book , ? 

 

just an IDEA/challenge to all of you members interested in this area .

 

Another idea is it possible that adding supplemental nutrients and amino acids  like L-Tryptophan  or grains like

Quinoa or Kaniwa

might boost  potency with this /Myceliated Grain TEK just one more  area to explore ?

 

Great Work .DonSHADOW thanks

 

BEZ

 

My hunch is that this mycelium grain will yield a more consistent and standardised source of psilocybin than mushrooms, which can vary markedly in potency (by up to a factor of 10 in P. cubensis), but this requires further testing. I think it will work well for microdosing though...the powdered, dried mycelium grain (at least of P. hoogshagenii/Semperviva) works well as a microdose (or a smidgen more than a microdose) when consumed in the quantity of a level dried teaspoon.

 

Further experimentation is warranted and strongly encouraged here, this is somewhat of a new frontier opening up to be explored in depth.

 

Experimenting with this, Don and I both advocate brown rice and oats as good grains to use...

 

In the 1980s, German mycologist Dr. Jochen Gartz, went so far as to file a patent (No. 88-09773, Akad. Wiss. DDR) on brown rice after his discovery that this medium supported the cultivation of P. cubensis of unprecedented potency--1% psilocybin/psilocin by dry weight (which almost equals Panaeolus cyanescens), the highest natural potency ever reported of this mushroom.

 

https://erowid.org/p...article10.shtml

 

...with the latter in mind, rice seems like a good grain to go for with this TEK in mind. Oats are another cheap and accessible grain, that like rice contain high amounts of both amino acid tryptophan and phosphorus, the former is a precursor to psilocybin, and the latter is a part of its molecular structure. So it is definitely great to experiment, but at the same time we maybe also don't need to try and reinvent the wheel here either.


  • bezevo, DonShadow and Nicked like this

#11 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 08 November 2019 - 04:25 PM

It’s really simple. Find genetics of a species known to be active in mycelial form. Only two are known with certainty to be active; Ps. caerulescens and Ps. semperviva, but experiment with others and report your findings. Incubate hydrated grain for 2 months. Break up the grains and dehydrate for 24 hours. If using brown rice, grind it up and mix into a smoothie or hot chocolate. If using large kernel grains like oats, barley or wheat, simmer and stir in a pot of water for 20 minutes. Strain the liquid through a coffee filter or mesh strainer, and mix in some tea or cacao with the strained liquid. 1 level tablespoon of dehydrated whole grain equals roughly 1 gram cubensis. Drink it slowly (over 45 minutes to an hour), as this stuff kicks in very fast and comes on like a freight train.

Edited by DonShadow, 08 November 2019 - 04:47 PM.

  • Samwise, bezevo and ElrikEriksson like this

#12 bezevo

bezevo

    Mycotopiate

  • Gold VIP
  • 736 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 08 November 2019 - 07:46 PM

FOLLOWING TOPIC !

 

LOTS GOOD INFO !



#13 Asura

Asura

    Cyantist

  • OG VIP
  • 148 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 09 November 2019 - 01:53 AM

Remembered another piece of information regarding pan cyan. Many people know that pan cinct's form stones aka blue pearls,

but I don't think it's widely known that pan cyans are stone producers as well. I had forgotten all about this until tonight, when I was

contacted by someone who was spawning. He told me he was pulling huge stones out of the jars. Still waiting to see some pics

but I will certainly share them here if it turns out to be interesting.

 

My gut tells me that this makes pan cyan a candidate for this tek but with the caveat that it may not always work. I know I have never

had stones in jars, but I have seen them form on plates. So perhaps, with certain cultures only?



#14 ElrikEriksson

ElrikEriksson

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 163 posts

Posted 09 November 2019 - 01:35 PM

Over on the shr°°mery there's a grower that reports once having grown a bloodline from a wild Pan. cyan. print which had a strong sclerotia producing tendency whereas his other cyans did not stone in the same conditions. That supports the genetics hypothesis. Did your communicant mention what variety he was getting stones from?
And will he eat them!?! :laugh:
Pan. cyanascens, tropicalis, and cambodginiensis have all been reported as producing sclerotia but I have yet to find a report of anyone actually consuming them. This I find incomprehensible.

After 16 plates I think I've managed to get growth out of my 9 year old, improperly stored, cambodginiensis partial. I'll certainly be making some myceliated grain tea, in due course.
And I think, as long as I'm making cambo LI for grain jars, I'll also shoot some into jars of coffee cooked grain just to look for stones.

Edited by ElrikEriksson, 09 November 2019 - 01:39 PM.


#15 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 November 2019 - 03:30 PM

Here are some photos of brown rice inoculated with Ps. semperviva and incubated for 2 months. Notice the intensity of the oxidization on the dried grain:

9A560D99-62A1-43C2-A20D-AF7F7B99C38E.jpeg

92237FE0-8ADA-4635-BC6D-8DC91766E724.jpeg

41645440-2EFB-4645-A4FA-50D8F3A58161.jpeg
  • Samwise likes this

#16 Asura

Asura

    Cyantist

  • OG VIP
  • 148 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 November 2019 - 09:31 PM

Your thread got moved back to Mush Cult on the other site, Don. It's getting pretty interesting.

blackout dropped all kinds of bombs on the thread.

 

I have a feeling we are all about to learn a lot more than we initially thought.



#17 DonShadow

DonShadow

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 326 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 November 2019 - 09:42 PM

Cool, it’s good to see solid contributions from others. IMO what matters most is learning what species produce active material in quantities sufficient to warrant being used in this way.

Edited by DonShadow, 10 November 2019 - 09:44 PM.


#18 ElrikEriksson

ElrikEriksson

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 163 posts

Posted Yesterday, 01:19 AM

I saw on the other site there were reports of azurescens mycelium being active so it can be on the list of species with compelling evidence.

 

While doing some agar transfers in a hybridization attempt I had a wacky idea, no one knows the potency potential of monokaryotic strains of actives because they can't fruit.

But we could find out the potency of monokaryotic myceliated grain! :ph34r:


  • CatsAndBats and bezevo like this

#19 Samwise

Samwise

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 111 posts

Posted Yesterday, 08:18 AM

Yes P. azurescens would definitely be another interesting species to experiment with, given its potency...I did inoculate some agar jars with spores of it a few weeks ago but no signs of germination, my print was very faint indeed, but keen to persevere with this. So far, P. hoogshagenii/Semperviva appears to be the most promising species, but I'm intrigued to see how P. caerulescens and P. zapotecorum compare. Interesting point about the monokaryotic strains.


  • CatsAndBats and DonShadow like this

#20 ElrikEriksson

ElrikEriksson

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 163 posts

Posted Yesterday, 01:20 PM

Its unfortunate that the positives to date are all hard-to-find species. I expect the next report to be on Psilocybe chuxiongensis :wink:

I'm surprised that no one has yet tried making tea from the grain spawn fraction obtained when harvesting tampanensis or mexicana sclerotia that had been consolidating for 3-6+ months.

Just now, like literally minutes ago, I saw first growth in four pints of wheat I injected with tampanensis LI, so in 3 months I can try that. Anyone want to beat me to it? Its a race! :tongue:






Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!