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Simultaneous Production of Psilocybin and a Cocktail of β‐Carboline Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in 'Magic' Mushrooms


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#1 elfstone

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Posted 17 November 2019 - 10:23 AM

Thanks to Samwise for pointing me to this article published on Nov 14, 2019 in Chemistry A European journal, Simultaneous Production of Psilocybin and a Cocktail of β‐Carboline Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in 'Magic' Mushrooms. I have posted the PDF file here for those interested.

With 45 years of experience working with multiple species, including the traditional species employed in Oaxaca, specifically Ps. caerulescens, Ps. zapotecorum, Ps. mexicana, Ps. semperviva and Ps. cubensis, as well as the wood loving species native to North America, I can say definitively that each species carries their unique signature. This new data could offer some explanation. The traditional species from Oaxaca also are “friendlier” on the body than the North American wood lovers, at least in my experience. The presence of beta carbolines in the mushroom is a significant finding. Back in 1982 Terence McKenna’s hypothesis published in his audio book, True Hallucinations, and in The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens and the I-Ching, was that combining the mushrooms with Banisteriopsis vine tea synergized the experiences which he and Dennis underwent on March 4, 1972, and subsequently led to further experimentation. In a letter to me in 1984 he recommended combining the mushroom with tea from B. caapi bark shavings. When we met in Chicago in 1987 Terence told me that he had found the combination unsettling, leading him to the feeling that something was wrong, checking himself and finding nothing definitive, then feeling that something was wrong, an anxiety loop that led him to discontinue exploration of this combination. My own experiences led me to fully concur with his observations. I can also assert that different strains of Ps. cubensis have unique qualities which could be explained by the presence of a varying spectrum of beta-carbolines. This research is thus very interesting!

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Edited by elfstone, 17 November 2019 - 10:40 AM.

  • Samwise, UnHeisenbug and CourageToGrow like this

#2 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 08:45 AM

Thanks to Samwise for pointing me to this article published on Nov 14, 2019 in Chemistry A European journal, Simultaneous Production of Psilocybin and a Cocktail of β‐Carboline Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in 'Magic' Mushrooms. I have posted the PDF file here for those interested.

With 45 years of experience working with multiple species, including the traditional species employed in Oaxaca, specifically Ps. caerulescens, Ps. zapotecorum, Ps. mexicana, Ps. semperviva and Ps. cubensis, as well as the wood loving species native to North America, I can say definitively that each species carries their unique signature. This new data could offer some explanation. The traditional species from Oaxaca also are “friendlier” on the body than the North American wood lovers, at least in my experience. The presence of beta carbolines in the mushroom is a significant finding. Back in 1982 Terence McKenna’s hypothesis published in his audio book, True Hallucinations, and in The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens and the I-Ching, was that combining the mushrooms with Banisteriopsis vine tea synergized the experiences which he and Dennis underwent on March 4, 1972, and subsequently led to further experimentation. In a letter to me in 1984 he recommended combining the mushroom with tea from B. caapi bark shavings. When we met in Chicago in 1987 Terence told me that he had found the combination unsettling, leading him to the feeling that something was wrong, checking himself and finding nothing definitive, then feeling that something was wrong, an anxiety loop that led him to discontinue exploration of this combination. My own experiences led me to fully concur with his observations. I can also assert that different strains of Ps. cubensis have unique qualities which could be explained by the presence of a varying spectrum of beta-carbolines. This research is thus very interesting!

[attachment=1172813:]

This is very interesting. I know friends who have always thought there were differences in species, but that wasn't readily explained by differing levels of psilocybin in the fungi.

I find it also quite interesting that a fungi would target the neurochemistry of animals. I would hypothesis that psilocybin and it's analogs must be an deterrent to insects/small mammals that would eat the mushroom. Else what is the evolutionary advantage of the compound? Or is it the products are so strangely attractive to ape cognition that the compounds were valuable in the symbiotic relationship?

Pardon the ramble. Keep up the good posts!

#3 YoshiTrainer

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 01:08 AM

Wow, an interesting read!

One take away, should we be eating P. Cubensis mycelium along with the carpophores for a greater effect? Just the newer mycelium.

"P. cubensis FSU12410 mycelia and carpophores were used to
quantify the concentration of 4, i.e., the major β-carboline in the
fungal biomass (Figure 1C, Table S2). While mycelia showed a
concentration of 21 µg g–1 dried biomass, we found a 100-fold
lower concentration in the carpophores (0.2 µg g–1). Sclerotia of
P. mexicana contained 1.4 µg g–1 4 and 1.6 µg g–1 5. Next, we
used MALDI imaging to investigate the spatial distribution of 4 in
fungal mycelium. An actively growing P. cubensis culture was
screened for a compound with m/z 183.1 (± 0.7) Da, which
corresponds to 4 (Figure 3). The signals of maximum intensity
localized to the hyphal tips while more mature areas showed low
abundance."

#4 CourageToGrow

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Posted 06 March 2020 - 09:57 PM

I'll be a guinea pig! The unsettling trips can be pretty "lesson" heavy. I love lessons ^_^



#5 Misfit

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Posted 06 March 2020 - 11:48 PM

I am going to read this later. Is it the same as what I posted earlier?

https://lucys-magazi...silohuasca-her/




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