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The Chaos Chronicles


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#41 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 10:56 AM

You know I watched that apocalyptico for the first time a week or so ago. It got me thinking about that whole notion of would we be better without all this technology, go back to their way of living. Nomadic tribal groups. It raised an interesting point when there village was attacked and totally wiped out. It showed how easily an apocalyptic event could happen, or at least your perception of the world would seem to come to an end.

 Our lives are so comfortable in this new age we forget, or rather we never knew. Like the simple fact that someone could just walk up and bash your brains in and that was the end of that. Or you got eaten by another animal. We are so disconnected from that notion i think it would be impossible to guess how their lives were

Good god that movie was ...something. 

 

It was apparently fortunate for all the historically-inaccurate savages that the implicitly more-advanced and civilized Xtians showed up when they did. Or maybe it wasn't; it was kind of ambiguous. One thing seemed pretty clear, though: It was murder-porn framed as Christian/Western propaganda.

 

 

I don't really see our world as any less dangerous than the primordial wilderness we came from; only the details have changed. The predators and threats we need to watch out for are almost entirely other humans or what other humans have built, but the rules for survival largely remain the same.

 

 

If anything the world is exponentially more dangerous now since we are still subject to all the old threats to our lives and civilization (drought, famine, volcanoes, etc. etc.) and all the new threats have only been added to the old ones (they didn't replace them, we just pushed them out of sight). So we need to add the collapse of agriculture from a destabilized climate, rapid global spread of any pandemics thanks to modern high-speed transportation, nuclear war, tungsten rods dropped on your head from space (coming soon to a satellite above your city), grid collapse and the cascading domino-effect of civilization falling apart shortly after, and/or World War III to the list.

 

I've had a friend killed by someone who walked up behind her and put a round in the back of her head (the only consolation being she never saw it coming), so it seems that we're not that much different than our ancestors. They used large, low-velocity rocks to bash each other's heads in (what barbarians!) while we use tiny high-velocity rocks to poke holes through them instead (how progressive!) because we're so goddamned advanced.



#42 August West

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 12:15 PM

Even though the timeline is shorter, your post reminded me of this recent story:

 

After fleeing war in Syria, Khaled Heeba was shot dead in the US

Khaled Heeba was shot dead in US city earlier this month after fleeing war in Syria more than three years ago.

 

A Syrian refugee who fled to the United States more than three years ago has become one of the city of Baltimore's latest gun violence victims, US media reported this week.

 

The Baltimore Sun reported on Tuesday that the killing of Khaled Heeba remains unsolved nearly two weeks after he died in Baltimore, Maryland. Heeba, 31, was on his last delivery route of the night before he was shot in the chest on a sidewalk.

 

According to a crowdfunding page in his memory, Heeba planned on attending Friday prayers after his last delivery.

 

"He was always concerned with our pleasure before his own. He'd work a long day and then come back and kiss my hands and feet and say 'Mama - be happy with me'. Wallahi I was always happy with him,"

 

Heeba's mother was quoted as saying on the crowdfunding site, which added that the 31-year-old was the sole provider for his family in the US.

 

Heeba's death is one of more than 40 homicides the city has seen so far this year.

 

He reportedly came to the US in 2016 after escaping Syria's civil war with his parents.

 

"He left his own country because it was a war-zone in Syria, just for him to end up getting murdered here," Theresa Birmingham, a coworker, told the Baltimore Sun, "He was just really a sweet guy."

 

Police in a tweet described the suspect as about five feet, nine inches tall (1.75 metres) with a slim build and wearing all black clothing.

 

Baltimore has been plagued by gun violence for years.

 

The city witnessed 348 homicides in 2018, according to the Baltimore Sun newspaper. That was up from 309 in 2018.

 

Of the 43 homicides documented by the newspaper's homicide database this year, at least 17 took place in February.

 

 



#43 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 02:43 PM

Yeah not really a fan of Mel Gibson movies. I watched it after someone recommended it as their favorite movie ever made, big claim.

 

Come to think of it if there was a point to that movie it was lost on me. All I remember is their village gets fucked up, they get taken as slaves and watch a bunch of people get their heads cut off. Then they escape and at the end see some colonial ships on the beach at the end



#44 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 02:44 PM

What happened to your friend if you don't mind talking about it? Sounds pretty crazy



#45 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 03:21 PM

What happened to your friend if you don't mind talking about it? Sounds pretty crazy

 

It's a depressingly-common story.

 

She had her shit together in every way, which made her very popular wherever she went (she was the kind of person who won her university's "hot bod" competition while also being top of her class in Law School). The last guy she went out on a date with struck her as creepy (he was one of her co-workers at a major legal firm) so she had probably just finished telling him that she didn't want to see him again when the many witnesses said she stood up and turned around to walk away, and when she did he pulled a pistol, held it up to the back of her head and pulled the trigger. He then immediately turned it on himself. This was in the middle of the Downtown area of one of the biggest cities in the US during lunch hour, so it was a pretty big deal at the time. She was a few weeks away from leaving the job to become a schoolteacher since she'd decided that she didn't like Law after all. The university she attended has a memorial scholarship named after her now. She's not the only friend I've lost to that kind of violence.



#46 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 03:44 PM

Truly a  tragedy, sorry to hear it. That sort of stuff rocks your world when it happens. Everyone's scrambles thinking what they could have done. Families get destroyed over it. I have enough of my own anger issues dealing with accidental death or suicide. I always wondered how family members deal with having a loved one murdered. It gives a target for all the rage, not sure if that's a good or a bad thing. 



#47 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 03:49 PM

Being in a small town you get some what isolated from the chaos of the world. It still happens, but it's far less frequent

 

It's stories like that have driven me to dismiss the notion of Karma. It just doesn't seem to pan out in the grand scheme of things. Sure bad thing happen to bad people, usually. It's all the good one's getting killed or sick that don't make any sense. And children, like seriously, where the hell does Karma account for giving a one year old cancer. I don't buy the past live's argument, then people that are suffering deserve it because of past misdeeds? So they deserve everything that is happening to them via some magical cosmic justice. So should we then have no sympathy for the homeless and downtrodden as they deserve their lot in life? Or someone you know dies, they deserved it? I think people have many different idea's of what Karma should be I could be opening up a can of worms here

 

To me it's like this. For every action there is a reaction. The more good you do chances are the reactions will be good, the more bad you do chances are the reactions will be bad. There is no gate keeper. Sometimes bad things happen to good people and sometimes good things happen to scum bags. 



#48 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 04:32 PM

 

 

To me it's like this. For every action there is a reaction. The more good you do chances are the reactions will be good, the more bad you do chances are the reactions will be bad. There is no gate keeper. Sometimes bad things happen to good people and sometimes good things happen to scum bags. 

 

That is the non-supernatural conception of Karma (i.e., it's just cause and effect), which is the entirety of how a lot of people view it. In the West we might say "Live by the sword, die by the sword" to express the same idea.

 

 

 

Many of the nicest, most compassionate and just plain good people I've ever met died way too young. It occurred to me that that could also be seen as an act of cosmic compassion if there is any supernatural aspect to Karma since it cut short the brutal ass-whooping that life visits upon those who are deeply empathetic. "Only the good die young" might be a manifestation of mercy and not evidence of a cruel or indifferent Universe.

 

Which means the rest of us who are still kickin' must have some pressing issues we still need need to work out, lol.


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#49 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 04:40 PM

 I always wondered how family members deal with having a loved one murdered. It gives a target for all the rage, not sure if that's a good or a bad thing. 

 

I've lost four to violence so far, and it never gets any less like how it is. One was ruled a suicide, but I don't believe that at all since she wasn't the type to douse herself with gasoline and ignite it to make a point (this happened during a child custody dispute with her abusive ex).


Edited by TVCasualty, 22 February 2020 - 04:41 PM.


#50 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:17 PM

Jesus, yeah you don't hear of people committing suicide that way

 

The world can be a really piece of shit sometimes it makes it hard to focus on the good things. It's strange how your perception can get changed by something like that. Things that had meaning lose them for a time, and others gain great importance. Then they can slowly shift back into the way they were


Edited by flashingrooster, 22 February 2020 - 05:26 PM.


#51 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:26 PM

Jesus, yeah you don't hear of people committing suicide that way

 

Not in the West, anyway.

 

It's shockingly common in other parts of the world, and has been on the rise. When I was told about what happened to my friend I tried to search for new reports about it and also found a shitload of accounts of women setting themselves on fire in places like Afghanistan, where it was the only way that they could really express themselves. Such incidents rarely appear in any news sources at all.



#52 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:28 PM

Yeah it's a statement suicide for sure. That monk in Vietnam is the only image that came to mind when you said it



#53 Alder Logs

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:29 PM

Just minutes into this week's gloom and doom report (which I listen to every week).  Thanks to corona virus, the chaos might be getting a shove.

 

[Direct Link]



#54 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 06:13 PM

Funny story: Meteorologists played a major role in the development of what became Chaos Theory, but not on purpose.

 

They were trying to figure out ways to predict the weather both more accurately and further into the future, but they ultimately proved mathematically that their goal was impossible beyond roughly 5 days out at the most, and usually just 3 (and yet the Weather Channel still issues 10-day forecasts, lol).

 

 

 

It was probably their forecasting models that resulted in the conception of the "Butterfly Effect" when they ran the same model repeatedly after making very small changes to the initial conditions that were probably considered negligible or statistically-insignificant before the development of Chaos Theory.

 

That is, they noticed that running a model of almost exactly the same parameters as they ran it last time except for changing a few bits of data out of millions or billions of such data points resulted in a profoundly different outcome. A change as small as the equivalent of a butterfly's wings flapping changes the model's forecast from a calm and pleasant day a week or two in the future to predicting a major hurricane.

 

And that's just what happens in the relatively-simple system of a weather forecasting model. Real, actual weather has more far variables in play than we could ever quantify (though it is also subject to the boundary conditions of climate), so the Butterfly Effect is arguably even more influential in the real world vs. our models.

 

 

So you can spray whatever you want into the atmosphere but you won't somehow be able to defy the math and predict what such actions will ultimately result in. And for that matter it would be monumentally difficult to predict where whatever is sprayed would even go since the atmosphere is stacked in layers that often have differing wind directions. I've seen 4 distinct cloud layers moving in 4 different directions simultaneously, which was a real trip. Trying to predict where whatever is sprayed at the upper levels will end up would be futile, though it's safe to say that if you see aerosols being released at 20,000-30,000 ft above your place you've got nothing to worry about as far as any of it settling on you or your property thanks to those upper-level winds.

 

Then there's those enormous dilution ratios to consider; it would take some very special compounds to be capable of doing what is often claimed is being done at the concentrations that would be found in the atmosphere shortly after being released. Even spraying pure LSD at such altitudes would have no noticeable effect on anything or anyone on the ground, assuming it even makes it to the ground (but not all chemtrail hypotheses involve stuff reaching the ground; it's hard to keep up).

 

 

There have always been contrails as long as there's been aviation, but I have some acquaintances who claim that EVERY trail they see in the sky is a "chemtrail" and intended to alter the weather.

 

I remain skeptical.



#55 Alder Logs

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 06:50 PM

That wasn't the part of this week's report I was putting it up here for.  Mr. Wigington does collect an interesting mix of headlines each week.



#56 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 08:03 PM

Why is it apparently inconceivable that it's a naturally-occurring virus that made a jump like has happened countless times before (including long before anyone had the ability to mess with DNA)?

 

Anyone familiar with the basics of Virology or Epidemiology knows that this sort of thing is highly likely to occur (if not inevitable) in the sorts of conditions where they are predictably occurring.


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#57 TVCasualty

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 01:23 AM

And this is why I love me some Chaos:
 

How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism’s Fatal Flaw
China’s use of surveillance and censorship makes it harder for Xi Jinping to know what’s going on in his own country.


 
A few highlights:
 

 

Xi would be far from the first authoritarian to have been blindsided. Ironically, for all the talk of the technological side of Chinese authoritarianism, China’s use of technology to ratchet up surveillance and censorship may have made things worse, by making it less likely that Xi would even know what was going on in his own country.

 

 

He really has no excuse for that since it's happened before in China:

 

On August 4, 1958, buoyed by reports pouring in from around the country of record grain, rice, and peanut production, an exuberant Chairman Mao Zedong wondered how to get rid of the excess, and advised people to eat “five meals a day.” Many did, gorging themselves in the new regime canteens and even dumping massive amounts of “leftovers” down gutters and toilets. Export agreements were made to send tons of food abroad in return for machinery or currency.

 

Just months later, perhaps the greatest famine in recorded history began, in which tens of millions would die because, in fact, there was no such surplus. Quite the opposite: The misguided agricultural policies of the Great Leap Forward had caused a collapse in food production. Yet instead of reporting the massive failures, the apparatchiks in various provinces had engaged in competitive exaggeration, reporting ever-increasing surpluses both because they were afraid of reporting bad news and because they wanted to please their superiors.

 

Mao didn’t know famine was at hand, because he had set up a system that ensured he would hear lies.

 

 

 

 

 

For some reason whenever Authoritarian regimes overplay their hand and fuck up royally, they always seem to do so in ways that seem like parodies of themselves (and yet the people involved have nothing even resembling a sense of humor, which only adds to the whole surreality of it all).

 

Well, a parody with a body count, unfortunately, so definitely a dark comedy. Everybody in charge was too busy pinning medals and planting incriminating evidence on each other as they played Game of Chairs to notice that the people were starting to drop dead of a mystery illness again, I guess.

 

 

It’s nearly impossible to gather direct evidence from such a secretive state, but consider the strong, divergent actions before and after January 20—within one day, Hubei officials went from almost complete cover-up and business as usual to shutting down a whole city.

 

 

So eventually the Emperor realized he was wearing no clothes and snapped out of it. It will be interesting to see if he stays snapped out of it or goes back to total surveillance, total control if business-as-usual ever resumes.

 

Anyway, the article details the timeline of the emergence of the virus and how it began with relatively minor mistakes that were not properly attended to that added up until they snowballed into a full-blown disaster, which is also the way people tend to die in the wilderness.

 

It's kind of fascinating to watch the math play out in politics like this. The more Order you put in, the more Chaos you get out. So no matter how oppressive and authoritarian a regime might desire to be, it is nevertheless in its own best long term self-interest to dial it back a bit lest it get destroyed by things it never saw coming (literally).

 

The trouble is, most authoritarian meatheaded egomaniacs suck at math and don't read much Chaos Theory so each of them has to learn this stuff the hard way. That means there's always a new crop of ambitious assholes pushing things too far and who think they can get away with it right after the last group of ambitious assholes went to prison or their bodies were dragged through the streets and put on display in the town square (depending on how pissed people were, I guess).

 

This basic level of ignorance seems to be why all the nasty shit repeats itself, which if true points to a possible way for us break out of the brutal cycles of history and finally give ourselves a chance to try something else for a change. In the 10-15 years we've got left before it's all moot, I mean.

 

 

 

Contrary to common belief, the killer digital app for authoritarianism isn’t listening in on people through increased surveillance, but listening to them as they express their honest opinions, especially complaints. An Orwellian surveillance-based system would be overwhelming and repressive, as it is now in China, but it would also be similar to losing sensation in parts of one’s body due to nerve injuries. Without the pain to warn the brain, the hand stays on the hot stove, unaware of the damage to the flesh until it’s too late.
 

During the Ming dynasty, Emperor Zhu Di found out that some petitions to the emperor had not made it to him, because officials were blocking them. He was alarmed and ordered such blocks removed. “Stability depends on superior and inferior communicating; there is none when they do not. From ancient times, many a state has fallen because a ruler did not know the affairs of the people,” he said. Xi would have done well to take note.

 

 

 


Edited by TVCasualty, 24 February 2020 - 01:38 AM.


#58 August West

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 02:10 AM

 

 

Contrary to common belief, the killer digital app for authoritarianism isn’t listening in on people through increased surveillance, but listening to them as they express their honest opinions, especially complaints. An Orwellian surveillance-based system would be overwhelming and repressive, as it is now in China, but it would also be similar to losing sensation in parts of one’s body due to nerve injuries. Without the pain to warn the brain, the hand stays on the hot stove, unaware of the damage to the flesh until it’s too late.

 

 

If you'll pardon my aside in focusing in on only one small part of your post and take the opportunity to drop this in here...Huxley thought the "app" for authoritarianism was to disguise it altogether.

 

“There will be, in the next generation or so, a pharmacological method of making people love their servitude, and producing dictatorship without tears, so to speak, producing a kind of painless concentration camp for entire societies, so that people will in fact have their liberties taken away from them, but will rather enjoy it, because they will be distracted from any desire to rebel by propaganda or brainwashing, or brainwashing enhanced by pharmacological methods. And this seems to be the final revolution.” -Aldous Huxley, The Ultimate Revolution, March 20, 1962 Berkeley Language Center

 

The whole thing is worth a listen, imo.

 

[Direct Link]

 

Alright. Back to the chaos...


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#59 TVCasualty

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 01:01 PM

I’ve heard it argued that it’s actually Huxley’s version of the future that won, not Orwell’s.

It’s a compelling argument, though it looks to me like they worked out their differences and came to a compromise where we ended up with a hybrid of both. You get a bit more Huxley in the urban centers and more Orwell in the sticks or under old-school regimes like North Korea.

But it’s just like any other arbitrary imposition of Order. The removal of the people’s agency via Huxley’s approach creates the same sort of institutional blindness at the top that overtly and brutally suppressing it does. In one case nobody gives a shit and in the other no one dares to speak up, but in both cases the flow of a critical source of information stops.

 You might have total control over a population of slow, drugged morons who've had any sense of a physically-cohesive community ‘relocated’ right out of them thereby rendering effective rebellions impossible (which took decades, but mission accomplished!). However, keeping such a population alive and functional enough to be worth controlling and spying on seems to be proving more costly and difficult than anticipated.

I imagine that some assume technology will come to the rescue, but all it can do is point out what everyone’s doing. Granted, there’s another technology of control that’s been quickly and quietly spreading around the world involving the intentional design of the built environment to constrain behavior, and I’ve been wanting to post a thread about that, too.

The Cliffs’ Notes version is that if you build a sidewalk along a street you can legally and safely walk your dog so long as it’s on a leash. But if you design and build the environment such that there’s nowhere for a dog to run to that’s not "legal" and “safe” then you can walk your dog without a leash. Which one is then an example of having more “freedom?” More people seem to be choosing the latter since it means they can go back to playing with their phone instead of paying attention to their surroundings. It will be interesting to see how Chaos messes with these attempts to build the means of control into the infrastructure of society itself. Once you know what to look for you will see examples everywhere. And since you can't change your environment like you can change your mind, if "shit happens" (or rather, when) then the architects will end up trapped in their own carefully-engineered labyrinths of Total Control. It'll get bad once they run out of Soma.


 Anyway, it’s still up to the assholes in charge to decide how to sort all that data and what to do about what it reveals. That’s a lot of work that only humans can do, and as we saw in Wuhan it becomes far too easy to miss the critical warning signals in all the unnecessary noise they generate with the constant and ubiquitous surveillance.

Counting on Chaos to save the day is really just the last better-than-nothing approach a population would want to go with since it occurs independently of what the people are or are not doing (rebellion is irrelevant and in the long run is nowhere near as devastating as apathy or incompetence).


 


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#60 TVCasualty

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Posted 29 February 2020 - 01:07 PM

And here most of us were assuming that robots would work for us, not the other way around:
 

How hard will the robots make us work?
In warehouses, call centers, and other sectors, intelligent machines are managing humans, and they’re making work more stressful, grueling, and dangerous


 


The robots are watching over hotel housekeepers, telling them which room to clean and tracking how quickly they do it. They’re managing software developers, monitoring their clicks and scrolls and docking their pay if they work too slowly. They’re listening to call center workers, telling them what to say, how to say it, and keeping them constantly, maximally busy. While we’ve been watching the horizon for the self-driving trucks, perpetually five years away, the robots arrived in the form of the supervisor, the foreman, the middle manager.

These automated systems can detect inefficiencies that a human manager never would — a moment’s downtime between calls, a habit of lingering at the coffee machine after finishing a task, a new route that, if all goes perfectly, could get a few more packages delivered in a day. But for workers, what look like inefficiencies to an algorithm were their last reserves of respite and autonomy, and as these little breaks and minor freedoms get optimized out, their jobs are becoming more intense, stressful, and dangerous. Over the last several months, I’ve spoken with more than 20 workers in six countries. For many of them, their greatest fear isn’t that robots might come for their jobs: it’s that robots have already become their boss.

 

 

 

And we thought "going postal" was bad.

 

"Going Amazon" will probably be much, much worse by virtue of how much more common/prevalent it's likely to become.


Edited by TVCasualty, 19 March 2020 - 08:01 PM.
fixed link

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