Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Buzz's First encounter with the Green Meanie.


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 buzzkilluton

buzzkilluton

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 293 posts

Posted 06 January 2020 - 12:59 AM

I regret to say I have caught the trich. I'm pretty sure it came from laziness I forgot to clean out my bucket before doing a pasteurizing run on some coir because it popped up in the two tubs I used it in. CLEAN YOUR TOOLS!!! Also might have came from using too much water (was a bit more moist than last run). USE A MEASURING CUP NOT YOUR EYEBALL!!! So in short don't get excited and skip steps like I did. On a lighter note I got a little orange insulated igloo cooler and some good brick coir and a new more accurate scale in the past couple days. So no more bucket and blanket. No more moist loose coir. And more accurate agar mixtures. So things are looking up.
  • wharfrat likes this

#2 RutgerHauer

RutgerHauer

    Knows Nothing

  • Free Member
  • 800 posts

Posted 06 January 2020 - 04:15 AM

That sucks. Always cleaning the tools you use is the best precaution and yes - don't skip steps. About skipping steps: I was a little distracted yesterday when loading up my PC and put it on the stove without any water, luckily I realized this in a minute so I could fix it. Not sure what would happen if I were to let it go that way. I would possibly have a fire on my hands since I put a dry dishcloth on the bottom.


Edited by RutgerHauer, 06 January 2020 - 04:38 AM.

  • buzzkilluton likes this

#3 buzzkilluton

buzzkilluton

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 293 posts

Posted 06 January 2020 - 02:05 PM

Yup lessons learned now I have to clean my my grow area top to bottom this next day off. Hopefully it's not in my new ongoing tubs. I use the Sterilite gasket containers so I just flip the lids and I sealed the contaminated container shut.

#4 MindHunter

MindHunter

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 30 posts

Posted 12 January 2020 - 09:02 AM

I had this problem in the beginning as well, I BLEACH EVERYTHING, and then place it in my SAB, in my still air room, and allow it to sit for 30min, and then bleach again, bout a 10/15 % ratio, but I also wear a mask for the vapors. And you're spot on with no missing steps, handle with care has become my motto, kinda like you would with a newborn. As from the very beginning of the thought process, they are my babies...and should be treated as such....until next time...HOLLA


  • DrepsiLocybe and buzzkilluton like this

#5 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 11,948 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 January 2020 - 11:56 AM

That sucks. Always cleaning the tools you use is the best precaution and yes - don't skip steps. About skipping steps: I was a little distracted yesterday when loading up my PC and put it on the stove without any water, luckily I realized this in a minute so I could fix it. Not sure what would happen if I were to let it go that way. I would possibly have a fire on my hands since I put a dry dishcloth on the bottom.


That was a close call. You probably would have caught it before it actually ignited the towel once it started smoking and stinking really badly, and if left for much longer than that it could have wrecked your cooker. I'm not sure how much you'd have to overheat a steel cooker before it's no longer safe to use but it's probably a lot higher than what it would take to wreck an aluminum cooker (like the All American brand that many of us use, especially in the U.S.), but when it comes to dry steam under pressure it's better to be safe than sorry so if I were to heat a dry cooker to the point where the metal changed color (whether steel or aluminum) or began to glow I'd destroy that cooker to insure it was never used again.
 
 
 

I had this problem in the beginning as well, I BLEACH EVERYTHING, and then place it in my SAB, in my still air room, and allow it to sit for 30min, and then bleach again, bout a 10/15 % ratio, but I also wear a mask for the vapors.

 

 

Bleach is not that great of a disinfectant for our purposes, and the fumes are definitely not good to breathe for prolonged periods.

 

Dishsoap and water, and good technique, are sufficient most of the time. It's really nice to not have to wear a bulky chemical respirator or have your eyes water from the fumes.

 

I only use a dilute bleach solution for cleaning bins or trays (or jars) that held contaminated substrates, and only do that outdoors. I clean them again with dishsoap and water just before using them on the next grow.



#6 MsBehavin420

MsBehavin420

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,164 posts

Posted 12 January 2020 - 01:53 PM

TVCasualty what about using 91% rubbing alcohol? Or vinegar, but thats also anti fungal(also is anti bacterial and anti viral) so i would make sure its rinsed out after.

I have seen some "deformed" caps from the use of chemicals like lysol or mr clean. Not sure about bleach though
  • buzzkilluton likes this

#7 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 11,948 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:17 PM

70% iso alcohol is far more effective at killing microorganisms than 91%. That's due to something about the way it denatures the cell walls of microorganisms (it's more effective at a lower osmotic pressure, or something like that).

 

91% is great for cleaning lipids and tars off of objects (cleaning the bong or wiping oil/grease off of stuff), and can always be diluted to 70% if necessary.


  • MsBehavin420 and buzzkilluton like this

#8 Stencill86

Stencill86

    Mycophiliac

  • Black VIP
  • 89 posts

Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:43 PM

Good to know, I always use 99% thinking that everything would evaporate, killing everything left behind. I was thinking anything lower would leave a residue of some sort, thanks for the info!
  • MsBehavin420 and buzzkilluton like this

#9 MsBehavin420

MsBehavin420

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,164 posts

Posted 15 January 2020 - 08:24 AM

I know they use 90+% on tools in a hair shop. Scissor, combs, things that cant get wet. I've recently switched to 100 % isopropyl due to convenience and availability.

From my understanding there is no residue left over from rubbing alcohol. Bleach yes

#10 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 11,948 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:44 PM

Good to know, I always use 99% thinking that everything would evaporate, killing everything left behind. I was thinking anything lower would leave a residue of some sort, thanks for the info!

 

Any solvent used with anything we intend to consume should be tested for residue by letting a sample of it evaporate on a mirror or piece of glass. If there's anything left after it evaporates then you got residue in whatever you make with it. Even supposedly 'clean' solvents should be tested since they might contain impurities that leave residues behind.

 

 

If 90+% isopropyl is used on tools like scissors and combs then it's probably being used to clean off the oil residues from hair and skin rather than as a disinfectant. But it will probably work okay as a disinfectant if the tools are left soaking long enough; one issue with 90+% is that it can evaporate too fast (before there's been enough exposure time to kill contaminants) but that's not relevant when soaking stuff in it.

 

 

And the residue left from bleach when it dries is almost entirely salt (sodium chloride), plus maybe a tiny bit of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide.






Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!