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No Pour agar questions


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#1 Moosecaboose

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 06:22 PM

So I recently tried the no pour agar tek using a pre-made PDA mix and food coloring. First time doing agar. They were very wet to say the least. But they are cleared up and dried a bit. I will post pictures when i get home. So I used spore syringes on six of them 2 - pink buffalo 2- creeper 2- Colombian rust. So far all but one are showing what i believe to be healthy spore germination and growth. So my question is whats should i do next? transfer the growth to fresh agar? Or try to let them fully colonize? again sorry about not posting the pictures yet.


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#2 wharfrat

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 06:32 PM

So I recently tried the no pour agar tek using a pre-made PDA mix and food coloring. First time doing agar. They were very wet to say the least. But they are cleared up and dried a bit. I will post pictures when i get home. So I used spore syringes on six of them 2 - pink buffalo 2- creeper 2- Colombian rust. So far all but one are showing what i believe to be healthy spore germination and growth. So my question is whats should i do next? transfer the growth to fresh agar? Or try to let them fully colonize? again sorry about not posting the pictures yet.

 

you will want to do a transfer once you got a decent enough growth to take from.. I suggest doing a search for sectoring or sectors.. there should be pics of where to take a sample from. 

 

if you leave the no pour agar jars in the p/c to cool off slowly wrap a towel around the p/c and let cool overnight, will help the condensation that forms in the jars.



#3 Moosecaboose

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 06:36 PM

Thank for the info. I did not know about sectoring, I will look into that forsure. And thanks for to tips on the moisture. Dialing my PC times and cool down times after not doing this for 5 years is kicking my ass for some reason. Maybe im just getting old.


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#4 sandman

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 07:45 PM

transfer when you have like a dimes size growth, repeat about 4-5 times and then you can start to let it grow out further to pick out sectors. Take really small sections when you do transfers! Do a lot of practice dry runs on transfers. When you cut the wedge make sure the cut doesn't have any gaps that weren't cut before you lift the wedge or it will snag and fall off the scalpel and fuck everything up. . 


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#5 CatsAndBats

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 12:43 PM

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.


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#6 Moosecaboose

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Posted 08 January 2020 - 02:26 PM

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.

So kind of like scrape up the mycellium and kind of push it into the middle of a new dish with a scalpel?


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#7 CatsAndBats

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Posted 09 January 2020 - 11:34 PM

 

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.

So kind of like scrape up the mycellium and kind of push it into the middle of a new dish with a scalpel?

 

I drag the tip of the scalpel across the longest rhizo myc (super easy if it's going up the glass, and if it's going up the glass, it's aggressive, IMHO), and then just slice into the new agar. The agar surface will catch the myc and one's scalpel will come clean, know what I mean?  ;)



#8 Moosecaboose

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 03:10 AM

 

 

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.

So kind of like scrape up the mycellium and kind of push it into the middle of a new dish with a scalpel?

 

I drag the tip of the scalpel across the longest rhizo myc (super easy if it's going up the glass, and if it's going up the glass, it's aggressive, IMHO), and then just slice into the new agar. The agar surface will catch the myc and one's scalpel will come clean, know what I mean?  ;)

 

Im picking up what you're laying down. I wish I could figure out how to post pictures. I checked on them today and there is tons on condensation, but they have grown like crazy since the last time I checked them. From my experience it looks like healthy mycellium growth, unless cobweb is common on agar? Going to do a test transfer tomorrow and see what happens.


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#9 CatsAndBats

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Posted 11 January 2020 - 09:07 AM

 

 

 

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.

So kind of like scrape up the mycellium and kind of push it into the middle of a new dish with a scalpel?

 

I drag the tip of the scalpel across the longest rhizo myc (super easy if it's going up the glass, and if it's going up the glass, it's aggressive, IMHO), and then just slice into the new agar. The agar surface will catch the myc and one's scalpel will come clean, know what I mean?  ;)

 

Im picking up what you're laying down. I wish I could figure out how to post pictures. I checked on them today and there is tons on condensation, but they have grown like crazy since the last time I checked them. From my experience it looks like healthy mycellium growth, unless cobweb is common on agar? Going to do a test transfer tomorrow and see what happens.

 

I'm not sure that I've ever seen cobweb on agar.



#10 Moosecaboose

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Posted 13 January 2020 - 12:53 PM

 

 

 

 

FWIW, I grab wisps of myc with my scalpel and slice them into the middle of new agar.

So kind of like scrape up the mycellium and kind of push it into the middle of a new dish with a scalpel?

 

I drag the tip of the scalpel across the longest rhizo myc (super easy if it's going up the glass, and if it's going up the glass, it's aggressive, IMHO), and then just slice into the new agar. The agar surface will catch the myc and one's scalpel will come clean, know what I mean?  ;)

 

Im picking up what you're laying down. I wish I could figure out how to post pictures. I checked on them today and there is tons on condensation, but they have grown like crazy since the last time I checked them. From my experience it looks like healthy mycellium growth, unless cobweb is common on agar? Going to do a test transfer tomorrow and see what happens.

 

I'm not sure that I've ever seen cobweb on agar.

 

Well another update since i have yet to figure out how to post pictures. They have almost fully colonized so i transfered them to new agar and also put a control plate in with them since i found out that's a good idea :P.






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