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How should I proceed?


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#1 ringworm

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 08:45 PM

So this was my first attempt at rye tek, and things were looking good at the start.  Healthy myc, no water in the jars, but before the myc. could really colonize, what I believe is wetspot kinda took over.  I had heard that waiting could allow the myc to take the jar back but after a few more weeks things appear to have stagnated, if not gotten worse.  There still is a fair bit of healthy looking mycelia in the jars but also lots of wetspot.  is there any way of salvaging? perhaps casing in the jars, or isolating the good stuff?

 

I posted 2 pics of 3 jars for reference.

 

Thanks guys, hope to hear back soon

 

Jar 1

20200129_173005.jpg

20200129_173009.jpg

 

Jar2

20200129_173018.jpg

20200129_173022.jpg

 

Jar 3

20200129_173053.jpg

20200129_173057.jpg

 


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#2 wharfrat

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 08:57 PM

looks like bacterial infection. welcome to topia  :biggrin:



#3 coorsmikey

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 10:39 PM

How should you proceed? Look back and try to find where things went wrong. How did they contaminate? Was it how your sterilized the grain? Was the contamination introduced by your process? A lot of folks like to blame the spores for being dirty which can happen but if you go with that one and it was you, then you will continue to make the same mistakes. So even if it was dirty spores look at it for what you may have done wrong. Spores are dirty and that's a fact, a lot of experts know this and highly recommend that spores need to go to agar or cakes first and not straight to grain or LC. People still take the chance and succeed but knowing that it's risky. You want to try to truly figure out how and where the contamination came in so you can fix the process. If it was not your technique or process and it was dirty spore consider doing agar to correct the process. If you find something in your process and you want to continue taking the risk of going from spores to grain, then go ahead. Whatever you decide, Starting over with some attempt at correction is the best bet. You will get closer to success faster starting over fresh than you will with any attempt of saving those jars. Don't fall victim to using peroxide or bleach when you can learn to get it perfect from the beginning. The more you do it the better your skillset will get. Start over and master aseptic technique and you will never have to attempt to save a failed project.



#4 ringworm

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 11:10 PM

Thanks for the speedy responses

 

I sterilized with a pretty sketchy used PC, and I think I got my grains a bit too wet (I've read this can increase chances of infection), but every effort was taken to make my work space sterile.  I have tried again (using the same PC), but I went for a shorter soak and a short boil over a long simmer to hydrate the grains.  They are visibly less wet in the jars, to the point I think they might be too dry... 

 

Dirty spores is a thought I hadn't considered but that could be it.  Next batch will likely be BRF cakes, as I have had success with them before and still have my SGFC.

 

No thoughts on salvaging this batch though?



#5 PJammer24

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 11:14 AM

The exterior of the grains should be mostly dry before loading jars... Too much water can increase contamination risk... Those jars are shot... Definitely start from scratch.. There is no salvaging any of that. make sure you pasteurize at 15 psi for 90 min... If the PC has a rocker, judge pressure using the rocker rather than a pressure gauge... Those gauges go bad after a while... If the rocker is not rocking, it is not at 15 psi...



#6 Alpoehi

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 11:23 AM

Don't worry, I tossed a lot of jars looking like this. They should have a bad smell due to the bacteria growing in it.

This smell I will never forget. When I smell this I toss the jar without thinking twice.



#7 Dabluebonic

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 05:14 PM

When i added some dry verm to the bottom of the grain jars i noticed my success rate grew. Alot of my contams are bacterial. Almost never see a mold. But yeah man try that dry verm#

#8 FunG

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 05:23 PM

The exterior of the grains should be mostly dry before loading jars... Too much water can increase contamination risk... Those jars are shot... Definitely start from scratch.. There is no salvaging any of that. make sure you pasteurize at 15 psi for 90 min... If the PC has a rocker, judge pressure using the rocker rather than a pressure gauge... Those gauges go bad after a while... If the rocker is not rocking, it is not at 15 psi...


What if it's a spinner weight? Or like mine, the entire weight rises up, jiggles and lowers....very loudly when it hits over pressure.... someone ought to catalog and sticky the three different psi regulators that pressure cookers use.




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