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BRF Cake first attempt, Am I on the right track?


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#1 Wumble

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Posted 30 March 2020 - 06:42 PM

First of all Hi everyone! 

 

So my first post and I'm looking for a little guidance.

 

My first experiment started on the 06/03/20 and I inoculated a small jar with some GT spores. The jar colonised pretty fast and  on the 20/03/20 I dunked and rolled. Placed it a SGFC and now I'm at this stage.

 

I think I birthed it too early as I found our later that I should leave for another week when fully colonised. I also noticed something was off a couple of days ago and found that the humidity had dropped considerably. The perlite was dry, I covered up some holes and used micropore for the rest. Humidity is fine now ( well 90%) but the temp is a little low for fruiting I think? 3 (67f). 

 

Looking at the pics I attached do you think I'm on the right track? I'm trying to figure out how to increase the temp but it's difficult to buy anything at the moment. I am using the heat mat for some grain transfers that I started from the BRF cakes and some Amazon mycelium.

 

Apologies if I posted in the wrong place but any help would be appreciated.  :rolleyes: 3.jpg 4.jpg



#2 FunG

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 08:44 PM

Cake looks pretty healthy

I can see it in recovery so once that thin mycelium mats back down it will then produce little pin sized white dots called primadora

About a week after that you'll see pins and then another week fully mature mushrooms.

They'll still fruit at 67f just painfully slow as your finding out but it could also be due to you fruiting before they had a chance to consolidate....I'd leave the cakes in the jars up until I seen primadora and then birth them but that's how I use to do cakes back before grains....wbs specifically.

Give it some more time Wumble. Your conditions are good.
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#3 FunG

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 08:46 PM

Fyi, I've been growing the golden teachers out for over a year solid now, first on popcorn and then on wbs and they're slow no matter what. Especially at fruiting, just a little reassurance for you.
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#4 Wumble

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Posted 05 April 2020 - 04:06 PM

Cheers Guys, Its nice to have a little encouragement! 

 

The slow fruiting is evident and I thought I got some pins forming then... Invasion of a blue colored mold!!! 

 

I tried to be surgical and remove it but its coming back now. I had another two jars colonising so I used that for 

brf to grain transfer and to some coir substrate. I'm three days into that now and I don't want to jinx anything so...

 

I have another little project, I think the spores were called Dutch Amazon? And very slow to colonise at about 75-75F but now are shooting out

 threads, which are growing quite rapidly now. I've attached some pics, the black dots are just so I can see the growth! Thanks for the help! 

 

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#5 coorsmikey

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Posted 05 April 2020 - 10:31 PM

I hope you didn't see bruising (blue) and mistake it for mold. 


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#6 Wumble

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Posted 08 April 2020 - 12:01 PM

I hope you didn't see bruising (blue) and mistake it for mold. 

 

I thought about that afterwards but remembered that I had not touched the cake at all up until that point. After I added more water to the perlite I started misting more so I am guessing I got moisture on the cake and caused contamination? Also my SGFC was on the floor which I only recently discovered is a no no! 



#7 Myc

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Posted 08 April 2020 - 05:26 PM

Please tell us that you did not trash that project.

Unless to do so, you put it in a flower pot full of moistened manure and straw.

That was healthy and robust.

 

And with regular misting you should not have to add water to the perlite beyond the initial saturation step.

After that misting will tend to build up moisture in the perlite which results in a puddle (or soupy perlite) and must be poured off periodically.

It is also beneficial to add a tablespoon of salt to the perlite - literally salt it like food. Don't let your culture come in contact with the salted perlite - or it will be harmed.

The increased salinity of the puddle of water discourages contaminants.

 

Rinse that perlite after you have gone through a fruiting cycle.

Spread the perlite evenly on trays and lay them out in the sun for - a time ( you figure it out) . You'll see that sunshine destroys all kinds of nasties and salinity gets the rest of them.

Be a scientist. Experiment, document (as in a notebook or online with Mycotopia), verify, replicate, share. ;)

 

Be the mycelium.


Edited by Myc, 08 April 2020 - 05:36 PM.

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#8 Wumble

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Posted 09 April 2020 - 06:13 PM

Please tell us that you did not trash that project.

Unless to do so, you put it in a flower pot full of moistened manure and straw.

That was healthy and robust.

 

And with regular misting you should not have to add water to the perlite beyond the initial saturation step.

After that misting will tend to build up moisture in the perlite which results in a puddle (or soupy perlite) and must be poured off periodically.

It is also beneficial to add a tablespoon of salt to the perlite - literally salt it like food. Don't let your culture come in contact with the salted perlite - or it will be harmed.

The increased salinity of the puddle of water discourages contaminants.

 

Rinse that perlite after you have gone through a fruiting cycle.

Spread the perlite evenly on trays and lay them out in the sun for - a time ( you figure it out) . You'll see that sunshine destroys all kinds of nasties and salinity gets the rest of them.

Be a scientist. Experiment, document (as in a notebook or online with Mycotopia), verify, replicate, share. ;)

 

Be the mycelium.

 

I still have the cake! I did not want to get rid of it just yet!

 

So I am assuming that I will need to pasteurise the manure and straw? And then like bury the cake in the new substrate? I can get straw but manure might be a bit more difficult with the lockdown but I can try. Also thank you for the advice. Really appreciate it!  



#9 Wumble

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Posted 09 April 2020 - 06:15 PM

Please tell us that you did not trash that project.

Unless to do so, you put it in a flower pot full of moistened manure and straw.

That was healthy and robust.

 

And with regular misting you should not have to add water to the perlite beyond the initial saturation step.

After that misting will tend to build up moisture in the perlite which results in a puddle (or soupy perlite) and must be poured off periodically.

It is also beneficial to add a tablespoon of salt to the perlite - literally salt it like food. Don't let your culture come in contact with the salted perlite - or it will be harmed.

The increased salinity of the puddle of water discourages contaminants.

 

Rinse that perlite after you have gone through a fruiting cycle.

Spread the perlite evenly on trays and lay them out in the sun for - a time ( you figure it out) . You'll see that sunshine destroys all kinds of nasties and salinity gets the rest of them.

Be a scientist. Experiment, document (as in a notebook or online with Mycotopia), verify, replicate, share. ;)

 

Be the mycelium.

 

So I am assuming that I will need to pasteurise the manure and straw? And then like bury the cake in the new substrate? I can get straw but manure might be a bit more difficult with the lockdown but I can try. Also so you think its better to crumble the cake into the new substrate or just bury in one chunk? thank you for the advice. Really appreciate it!  


Edited by Wumble, 09 April 2020 - 06:46 PM.


#10 Myc

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 10:18 AM

For outdoor cultivation - no pasteurization of any materials is required. 

Mix your manure and straw in a wheelbarrow or something similar. Wet the materials to field capacity and lay the substrate out in a flower bed about 6 inches deep. No pasteurization, no sanitation, no gloves, no masks, no special water, - just a garden hose for water, field aged manure, straw, garden hoe or fork for mixing (and of course, clean spawn). 

You can crumble the cake into the properly hydrated materials and mix. 

Case with a loose layer of leaves or potting soil on top. 

Wait for results. 


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#11 Arathu

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 05:44 PM

Be careful that you don't stumble onto massive success outside in the wide open. Shade from sun and prying eye's. If you follow what Myc just said above me here and put six of those cakes, like the ones you show in the first post, into a wheelbarrow load of field capacity HPOO and straw, in the shade and keep moist (not wet), you'll likely need a large basket and dehydrator to deal with the results. 

 

That was one healthy looking cake just cold and slow.....still I would have loved to see that fruit out.

 

If a mycelium of this species turns blue, and they will when stressed, it's hollering about something. 

 

Outdoor beds tend to heal all kind of contamination problems for certain.


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#12 Wumble

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Posted 12 April 2020 - 07:01 PM

Be careful that you don't stumble onto massive success outside in the wide open. Shade from sun and prying eye's. If you follow what Myc just said above me here and put six of those cakes, like the ones you show in the first post, into a wheelbarrow load of field capacity HPOO and straw, in the shade and keep moist (not wet), you'll likely need a large basket and dehydrator to deal with the results. 

 

That was one healthy looking cake just cold and slow.....still I would have loved to see that fruit out.

 

If a mycelium of this species turns blue, and they will when stressed, it's hollering about something. 

 

Outdoor beds tend to heal all kind of contamination problems for certain.

 

I decided to place the cake in a small plant pot and surrounded it with straw and potting mix. I have some more mycelium covered in a shaded area away from any prying eyes. One of the variables here is that the outdoor temps are cold at the moment ( highs of 51c) but summer is coming, so lets see what happens there! 

 

I have another BRF cake which I am just itching to birth so I've attached images of it here. What do you guys think? This is about four weeks old now and was colonised in the same environment as the one at the beginning of this thread. So it was probably too cold for the first couple of weeks but once I got the temps up it looked better. Should I birth this now?

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#13 Arathu

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Posted 12 April 2020 - 07:17 PM

What are those black spots? (Never mind you sharpee markered the jars gotcha)

 

Looks wet, some bacterial infection perhaps? (Nope just being paranoid)

 

Don't open that yet...need more eye's on it. (After second look I'd wait it out and let colonize fully)

 

A


Edited by Arathu, 12 April 2020 - 07:21 PM.

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#14 Wumble

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Posted 12 April 2020 - 07:26 PM

What are those black spots? (Never mind you sharpee markered the jars gotcha)

 

Looks wet, some bacterial infection perhaps? (Nope just being paranoid)

 

Don't open that yet...need more eye's on it. (After second look I'd wait it out and let colonize fully)

 

A

 

Yes I used a sharpie to see the growth a little better!

 

There are some water droplets inside which come and go depending on the temp. I started exposing to indirect sunlight for the last three days so when I have it tucked away at night the condensation starts. Its hard keeping the temp stable at the moment.

 

I also notice that the images I attached are quite large, zoomed out you can get a better view.


Edited by Wumble, 12 April 2020 - 07:28 PM.

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#15 Arathu

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Posted 12 April 2020 - 07:34 PM

It's looking pretty good actually just a little more and then happy birthday.....I couldn't tell if the sub was wet or not but now that you say condensation.

 

Stay the course, a good jar can fruit completely invitro, some even wait until pins are evident and then birth.

 

I'd let that consolidate and grow more just as you have it. It's making progress right? No strange smells, white with ropes running the cake.

 

Steady as she goes.....

 


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