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#1 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 02:51 PM

Every once in a while I find a video I want to post but fail to find the right thread to place it in so voila.

 

Me spot to throw some stuff out there.

 

 

This is a pretty intense video, lots of detail in the image. Go full screen.

 

The lighting somehow manages to make molten metal raining down from the sky even more terrifying

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by flashingrooster, 03 April 2020 - 02:52 PM.

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#2 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 03:14 PM

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#3 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 03:20 PM

Glad this show is coming back it always cracked me up

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by flashingrooster, 03 April 2020 - 03:21 PM.


#4 TVCasualty

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 03:45 PM

 

That was beyond awesome. :thumbs_up:

 

The exploding mountain was pretty neat, too. But that octopus stole the show...


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#5 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 03:59 PM

They are really fascinating creatures



#6 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 12:05 PM

Standing that close to such raw energy would be an incredible experience

 

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#7 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 06 April 2020 - 12:29 PM

Makes you wonder what life would have been like if such camouflage was adopted to land animals.

 

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#8 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 08 April 2020 - 11:26 AM

The trick at 1:23 has me stumped

 

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Edited by flashingrooster, 08 April 2020 - 11:27 AM.

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#9 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 08 April 2020 - 11:38 AM

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#10 Wimzers

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Posted 08 April 2020 - 06:30 PM

 

I'll never forget the crow/raven that hovered beside a buddy and I walking up a hill. The bird hovered at head height approx 10' away in the wind while we were tripping balls on acid. It just stared at us. Was an incredible experience that I still do not understand, but will never forget. And on a side note because I'm thinking about that day, we were able to correctly gauge the gusts of wind while playing hacky sack making it the best game we ever played. Acid is incredible. Not that I'm telling you guys anything new. 


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#11 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 02:50 PM

A friend of mine keeps saying we should do a round of golf on acid. I know what you mean

 

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#12 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 03:07 PM

Coool

 

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#13 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 10 April 2020 - 03:18 PM

Something strangely addicting to these puzzle videos

 

[Direct Link]

 

 

This one's a little more complex

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by flashingrooster, 10 April 2020 - 03:26 PM.

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#14 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 11:27 AM

Would I like to trip with an octopus on mdma? Hell yeah.

 

What Ecstasy Does to Octopuses Despite their wacky brains, these intelligent animals seem to respond to the drug in a very similar way to humans

 

 

https://getpocket.co...e=pocket-newtab

 

 

Thought this was interesting

 

Octopus And Squid Evolution Is Officially Weirder Than We Could Have Ever Imagined
SIGNE DEAN
17 MARCH 2018

Just when we thought octopuses couldn't be any weirder, it turns out that they and their cephalopod brethren evolve differently from nearly every other organism on the planet.

In a surprising twist, in April last year scientists discovered that octopuses, along with some squid and cuttlefish species, routinely edit their RNA (ribonucleic acid) sequences to adapt to their environment.

This is weird because that's really not how adaptations usually happen in multicellular animals. When an organism changes in some fundamental way, it typically starts with a genetic mutation - a change to the DNA.

Those genetic changes are then translated into action by DNA's molecular sidekick, RNA. You can think of DNA instructions as a recipe, while RNA is the chef that orchestrates the cooking in the kitchen of each cell, producing necessary proteins that keep the whole organism going.

But RNA doesn't just blindly execute instructions - occasionally it improvises with some of the ingredients, changing which proteins are produced in the cell in a rare process called RNA editing.

When such an edit happens, it can change how the proteins work, allowing the organism to fine-tune its genetic information without actually undergoing any genetic mutations. But most organisms don't really bother with this method, as it's messy and causes problems more often that solving them.

"The consensus among folks who study such things is Mother Nature gave RNA editing a try, found it wanting, and largely abandoned it," Anna Vlasits reported for Wired.

 

But it looks like cephalopods didn't get the memo.

In 2015, researchers discovered that the common squid has edited more than 60 percent of RNA in its nervous system. Those edits essentially changed its brain physiology, presumably to adapt to various temperature conditions in the ocean.

The team returned in 2017 with an even more startling finding - at least two species of octopus and one cuttlefish do the same thing on a regular basis. To draw evolutionary comparisons, they also looked at a nautilus and a gastropod slug, and found their RNA-editing prowess to be lacking.

"This shows that high levels of RNA editing is not generally a molluscan thing; it's an invention of the coleoid cephalopods," said co-lead researcher, Joshua Rosenthal of the US Marine Biological Laboratory.

The researchers analysed hundreds of thousands of RNA recording sites in these animals, who belong to the coleoid subclass of cephalopods. They found that clever RNA editing was especially common in the coleoid nervous system.

"I wonder if it has to do with their extremely developed brains," geneticist Kazuko Nishikura from the US Wistar Institute, who wasn't involved in the study, told Ed Yong at The Atlantic

 

It's true that coleoid cephalopods are exceptionally intelligent. There are countless riveting octopus escape artist stories out there, not to mention evidence of tool use, and that one eight-armed guy at a New Zealand aquarium who learned to photograph people. (Yes, really.)

So it's certainly a compelling hypothesis that octopus smarts might come from their unconventionally high reliance on RNA edits to keep the brain going.

"There is something fundamentally different going on in these cephalopods," said Rosenthal.

But it's not just that these animals are adept at fixing up their RNA as needed - the team found that this ability came with a distinct evolutionary tradeoff, which sets them apart from the rest of the animal world.

In terms of run-of-the-mill genomic evolution (the one that uses genetic mutations, as mentioned above), coleoids have been evolving really, really slowly. The researchers claimed that this has been a necessary sacrifice - if you find a mechanism that helps you survive, just keep using it.

"The conclusion here is that in order to maintain this flexibility to edit RNA, the coleoids have had to give up the ability to evolve in the surrounding regions - a lot," said Rosenthal.

As the next step, the team will be developing genetic models of cephalopods so they can trace how and when this RNA editing kicks in. 

"It could be something as simple as temperature changes or as complicated as experience, a form of memory," said Rosenthal.

The findings have been published in Cell.

A version of this story was originally published in 2017.


Edited by flashingrooster, 13 April 2020 - 11:29 AM.

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#15 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 16 April 2020 - 09:08 PM

This program can really open your eyes to marketing and the mind games they play with us.

 

Get some of that 100 percent modified "pure" orange juice

 

[Direct Link]

 

 

People like to say that the colour of the yolk is an indication of how fresh the egg is. Or that it is raised on a better diet. I talked to a commercial grower and he admitted they can just put additives in feed to give the illusion of a diet rich in what naturally colours eggs

 

[Direct Link]


Edited by flashingrooster, 16 April 2020 - 09:32 PM.

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#16 August West

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Posted 16 April 2020 - 10:37 PM

 

People like to say that the colour of the yolk is an indication of how fresh the egg is. Or that it is raised on a better diet.

I don't particularly "like" to say this. However, ime, it's a fucking fact. I don't know about "freshness" per se, or even better diet but any eggs I've ever "raised" make store eggs look totally anemic - including "organic" and/or "cage free/free range" eggs. And it goes for both ducks and chickens. Maybe it's just having less birds that are actually free range and don't live in cages, I don't know. But every "backyard" egg I've ever had falls into this category as compared to eggs from the store. I've also never heard of anyone supplementing something in a bird's diet to get the eggs to look the way mine do. Color me skeptical...see what I did there...?


Edited by August West, 16 April 2020 - 10:38 PM.

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#17 Moonless

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Posted 17 April 2020 - 12:28 AM

I watched that full egg video. I don't usually buy eggs from the store I see it more as a luxury because I only buy the pasture raised eggs. Sometimes my partner would bring back yard eggs from a the succulent expert at her work. I like both products but my favorite is the back yard because they have many pretty colors on their shell. None the less it was a good watch. Thanks


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#18 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 17 April 2020 - 11:46 AM

 

 

People like to say that the colour of the yolk is an indication of how fresh the egg is. Or that it is raised on a better diet.

I don't particularly "like" to say this. However, ime, it's a fucking fact. I don't know about "freshness" per se, or even better diet but any eggs I've ever "raised" make store eggs look totally anemic - including "organic" and/or "cage free/free range" eggs. And it goes for both ducks and chickens. Maybe it's just having less birds that are actually free range and don't live in cages, I don't know. But every "backyard" egg I've ever had falls into this category as compared to eggs from the store. I've also never heard of anyone supplementing something in a bird's diet to get the eggs to look the way mine do. Color me skeptical...see what I did there...?


 

 

You would be surprised how much our taste is influenced by other factors. Such as colours and smells. A guy can easily pull Jedi mind tricks on himself. I watched a video where they took grape juice and coloured it orange. Everyone who drank it swore it was orange juice

 

 

https://blog.backtot...-color-meaning/

Yolk Color …and Egg Quality

Let’s set the record straight here: Yolk color has no relationship to egg quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness, according to The American Egg Board. The macronutrient composition of darker-colored and lighter-colored eggs is identical, however there may be some very minor differences in micronutrient concentrations like vitamin A and lutein. All in all, an egg’s an egg.

 

What does it mean?

Egg yolks range in color from pale yellow to deep orange. The color of an egg’s yolk depends solely upon the hen’s diet. The darker color of a yolk signals the presence of carotenoids, which are natural pigments found in some plants. The availability of carotenoid-rich plants for chickens’ consumption affects the “orangeness” that you see in their eggs yolks. Keep in mind that chickens should be fed an omnivorous diet with insect and animal proteins as well as vegetable and grain-based ingredients, but the presence of carotenoids in hens’ diets is the main determinant of color.

 

Deep Orange

Since carotenoid-rich fodder is more common and available in “Pasture Raised” operations, eggs from these chickens are more likely to be deeper orange in color. However, any chicken egg can turn out orange, not just pasture raised ones. As long as chicken feed contains the nutrients that trigger orangeness, the yolk will turn out this deeper color.

 

Mid-orange to golden yellow

Hen diets heavy in green plants, yellow corn, alfalfa and other plant material with xanthophylls pigment (a yellow-orange hue) will produce a darker yellow-orange yolk, according to Food & Nutrition Magazine. This is the most common color yolk we see in eggs available at the grocery store.

 

Pale yellow

Diets lower in xanthophylls, such as feeding regimens that consist of mostly wheat, white cornmeal or barley produce pale yellow yolks.

 

 

 

  https://www.thoughtc...lk-color-607441 Egg Color and Nutrition

Eggshell and yolk color are unrelated to the nutritional content or flavor of an egg. The shell color naturally ranges from white to brown depending on the breed of chicken. Yolk color depends on the diet fed to the hens.

 

The shell thickness, cooking quality, and value of an egg is not affected by its color.​

 

 

https://www.thoughtc...lk-color-607441

The Secret Behind Egg Yolk Color

Despite this common misconception, the exact shade of your egg yolks has nothing to do with the chicken breed–although it can affect the color of the eggshell. The shade of an egg yolk is completely determined by the hen’s diet. Hens who are given feed full of yellow-orange pigments will lay eggs with darker yolks. It’s as simple as that! No artificial coloring is allowed in chicken feed, but some farmers will add marigold petals to give egg yolks an orangey color boost. Reddish yolks are made possible by adding capsicum (i.e. red bell peppers) to chicken feed, and throwing in a dash of paprika can have the same effect.

 

 

https://www.tasteofh...fferent-colors/ Changing Yolk Color at the Source

If you raise chickens, you can change the color of the yolks of the eggs they produce by controlling their diet. Specifically, you control the carotenoids or xanthophylls they eat.

Carotenoids are pigment molecules found in plants, responsible for the orange of carrots, red of beets, yellow of marigolds, purple of cabbages, etc. Certain commercial pigments are available as supplements added to feed to influence egg yolk colors, such as BASF's Lucantin® red and Lucantin® yellow. Natural foods also affect yolk color. Yellow, orange, red, and possibly purple may be obtained, but for blue and green you likely have to resort to synthetic dyes.

Edited by flashingrooster, 17 April 2020 - 11:49 AM.

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#19 August West

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Posted 17 April 2020 - 12:48 PM


You would be surprised how much our taste is influenced by other factors. Such as colours and smells. A guy can easily pull Jedi mind tricks on himself. I watched a video where they took grape juice and coloured it orange. Everyone who drank it swore it was orange juice

 

 

https://blog.backtot...-color-meaning/

Yolk Color …and Egg Quality

Let’s set the record straight here: Yolk color has no relationship to egg quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness, according to The American Egg Board. The macronutrient composition of darker-colored and lighter-colored eggs is identical, however there may be some very minor differences in micronutrient concentrations like vitamin A and lutein. All in all, an egg’s an egg.

 

What does it mean?

Egg yolks range in color from pale yellow to deep orange. The color of an egg’s yolk depends solely upon the hen’s diet. The darker color of a yolk signals the presence of carotenoids, which are natural pigments found in some plants. The availability of carotenoid-rich plants for chickens’ consumption affects the “orangeness” that you see in their eggs yolks. Keep in mind that chickens should be fed an omnivorous diet with insect and animal proteins as well as vegetable and grain-based ingredients, but the presence of carotenoids in hens’ diets is the main determinant of color.

 

Deep Orange

Since carotenoid-rich fodder is more common and available in “Pasture Raised” operations, eggs from these chickens are more likely to be deeper orange in color. However, any chicken egg can turn out orange, not just pasture raised ones. As long as chicken feed contains the nutrients that trigger orangeness, the yolk will turn out this deeper color.

 

Mid-orange to golden yellow

Hen diets heavy in green plants, yellow corn, alfalfa and other plant material with xanthophylls pigment (a yellow-orange hue) will produce a darker yellow-orange yolk, according to Food & Nutrition Magazine. This is the most common color yolk we see in eggs available at the grocery store.

 

Pale yellow

Diets lower in xanthophylls, such as feeding regimens that consist of mostly wheat, white cornmeal or barley produce pale yellow yolks.

 

 

 

  https://www.thoughtc...lk-color-607441 Egg Color and Nutrition

Eggshell and yolk color are unrelated to the nutritional content or flavor of an egg. The shell color naturally ranges from white to brown depending on the breed of chicken. Yolk color depends on the diet fed to the hens.

 

The shell thickness, cooking quality, and value of an egg is not affected by its color.​

 

 

https://www.thoughtc...lk-color-607441

The Secret Behind Egg Yolk Color

Despite this common misconception, the exact shade of your egg yolks has nothing to do with the chicken breed–although it can affect the color of the eggshell. The shade of an egg yolk is completely determined by the hen’s diet. Hens who are given feed full of yellow-orange pigments will lay eggs with darker yolks. It’s as simple as that! No artificial coloring is allowed in chicken feed, but some farmers will add marigold petals to give egg yolks an orangey color boost. Reddish yolks are made possible by adding capsicum (i.e. red bell peppers) to chicken feed, and throwing in a dash of paprika can have the same effect.

 

 

https://www.tasteofh...fferent-colors/ Changing Yolk Color at the Source

If you raise chickens, you can change the color of the yolks of the eggs they produce by controlling their diet. Specifically, you control the carotenoids or xanthophylls they eat.

Carotenoids are pigment molecules found in plants, responsible for the orange of carrots, red of beets, yellow of marigolds, purple of cabbages, etc. Certain commercial pigments are available as supplements added to feed to influence egg yolk colors, such as BASF's Lucantin® red and Lucantin® yellow. Natural foods also affect yolk color. Yellow, orange, red, and possibly purple may be obtained, but for blue and green you likely have to resort to synthetic dyes.

 

I'm pretty familiar with how taste is influenced by other factors - a lot of research out there on that.

 

You'll also notice that I never suggested that color had anything to do with

egg quality, flavor, nutritive value, cooking characteristics or shell thickness

 

 

I simply said that I've never, as in, ever, seen a store-bought egg with a yolk color the deep orange that "backyard" eggs have. If it's possible to "color" the egg with "Jedi Mind Tricks", there isn't a single farmer in the thousands of eggs that I've ever purchased (conventional, cage-free, pastured - all of which have varying meanings btw) that are doing it. I don't really quite understand (btw, your commercial farmer friend from your earlier post suggested diet doesn't matter but your more recent post contradicts that claim). If the deep color is due to carotene and the eggs lacks color, therefor carotene, then their diet is different. This would suggest the egg supplies less carotene to the consumer. Whatever.

 

This also got me thinking a little about the "vitamin debate". Mainstream science, at least as far as most articles are concerned, suggest that supplementing with vitamins is a pretty useless endeavor. How does this wash with vitamin fortified foods? If taking a multivitamin is pointless, I don't understand how adding vitamin D and calcium to ones homogenized, pasteurized milk would be any different. My guess is that the science claiming to debunk the value of vitamin tablets and capsules are the same scientists claiming that vitamin-fortified foods offer value due to the vitamin "enrichment". Not only human vitamin-fortified foods but animals. A hen that never leaves a cage is eating food that is solely fortified. Is that different than a human taking a supplement or is this simply science-as-decided-by-convenience? I can't be the first person to wonder this.



#20 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 17 April 2020 - 01:14 PM

All I am trying to say is you can fake egg yolk colour. So when a person is buying store bought egg's and they decide the egg is better than another brand due to colour. The reason I mentioned the commercial grower was the fact that people like to see a darker egg yolk colour. We mentioned that about his eggs and he admitted it's just a natural colouring additive in the feed.

 

 

Hens who are given feed full of yellow-orange pigments will lay eggs with darker yolks. It’s as simple as that! No artificial coloring is allowed in chicken feed, but some farmers will add marigold petals to give egg yolks an orangey color boost. Reddish yolks are made possible by adding capsicum (i.e. red bell peppers) to chicken feed, and throwing in a dash of paprika can have the same effect.






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