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Greenhouse/Martha setup/pics & fan retrofit question


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#1 Pakil

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Posted 02 May 2020 - 04:17 PM

Hi all, I’ve been using this as-is for a couple months, and the oysters I grew were great. The shiitake and reishi seem to be doing ok. My fresh air is limited to what the ultrasonic humidifier grabs before puffing it through the hose, plus a few times a day I open the flap and turn a box fan on it. The humidifier runs 30 minutes on, 30 minutes off, on low. I know this isn’t ideal when I’m not here all day, so I ordered a pair of fans for intake and exhaust.

 

My supplies came in and I wouldn’t mind a few opinions. I’m thinking I’ll mount my fans in position 1 and position 4, and run them simultaneously for a short time each hour, and kick on the humidity after the air is replaced, however often it’s needed to maintain 80-90%. 
 

The fans are a bit heavier (and bigger) than I expected. Any ideas on how to mount them? Maybe a frame of rigid plastic or very thin plywood with a circle cut out for the fan? There are 4 mounting holes in each fan, one on each corner. Since I can’t bolt the fans directly to the plastic because of the weight and thickness/thin-ness of the greenhouse walls, my only idea right now is to mount them to something I can affix to the outside of the greenhouse with tape or silicone. There are also the frame pieces inside the greenhouse that I could wire to or hang something from to help support any weight.

 

The seller also included 2 in-line speed controls. To avoid a bunch of wall plugs, I can daisy chain the power cords and speed control into one long run. 
 

I’d really appreciate any constructive brainstorms  :)

p~
 

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#2 Pakil

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 12:53 AM

While replacing my dryer vent, I realized that what I want to make for each fan is a “flange”. :) 



#3 Rac3k

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Posted 05 May 2020 - 07:15 AM

I think 1 vent would be enough. So because u have humidity coming from right side I would put the vent on your number 5, and it need to blow OUT , not IN, so that is creates a vaccum inside. Then you make another hole on the top (2)  with a filter where the freash air will come into and drag the humidity and fresh air down. This way you replace the stagnant air.

 

Are those repetitive cycle timers=?..thats what you want..for example you make 3 min ON 15min OFF, 



#4 Pakil

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Posted 06 May 2020 - 12:55 AM

Thanks. It looks a little deceptive - the humidifier pipe goes about 1/3 of the way across, and it’s tied to stay near the peak. It poofs the humid air out toward the center. I intended it to fall dead center, but it’s heaviest on the left side.

 

Yes, they’re the timers that can go 3 min on and 15 off. A guy from the company sent me simplified instructions for infinite on/off cycles. Once I sync the clocks on each one, I should be able to dial it in. 
 

I still haven’t thought of a good way to mount the fans.

 

A9C387FC-54C4-4775-9C02-52FBB74E3E31.png

The shiitakes seem happy, I’m blasting fresh air in with a big fan every few hours. Mushroom cheese soup tonight :)

 

 


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#5 Moonless

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Posted 06 May 2020 - 01:11 AM

That looks so yummy and I am totally jelous!



#6 Arathu

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Posted 24 May 2020 - 11:10 PM

How you gonna argue with that? Sweet! Great job man....those look fantastic in fact.

 

A


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#7 TVCasualty

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Posted 25 May 2020 - 12:10 PM

I've found a lot of uses for sheets of FRP in custom automated grow setups, and it would probably work great for a mounting flange for your fans.

 

It stands for "Fiber Reinforced Plastic" and is sold in 4X8 sheets (that are roughly a 16th of an inch thick) at big hardware stores. It's the same textured plastic panels that cover the walls of most gas station bathrooms. It's not cheap, and relatively heavy (and a PITA to handle when in full sheets), but being structurally strong and totally waterproof are really nice features that make it useful in lots of ways so the challenges of working with it are worth it IMO. A full sheet is like a heavy wet noodle when you try to carry it, but small pieces like you'd use for the fan are rigid enough to act as structural components.

 

It can be tricky to cut, and isn't the easiest material to work with but when you get some experience messing with it it's hard to beat in the contexts where it's useful.


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#8 Pakil

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 11:48 AM

Thanks! That sounds about perfect, except the 4x8 part! :) I was thinking possibly something like the flexible plastic some 3-ring binders have. I put up a shower surround once, with noodley panels glued to the walls. Thanks for the idea! My mind’s on a different track now.

I was sent the wrong timers, so I’m still waiting for those. I used a scrap of 1/4” plywood to mount the top fan for now. I manually click it on a few times a day and let the air blow out the bottom, my usb extension cords haven’t arrived yet, so I’m not automated at all yet. Luckily there’s just been reishi in there, but I’m rehydrating my shiitake blocks and have rye jars colonized with oysters to take care of - so I’ll need to pay more attention :)
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#9 TVCasualty

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Posted 27 May 2020 - 01:40 PM

You can also get a small piece of flat, rigid plastic by cutting one off of a cracked plastic bin, or its lid. Usually the lids are the only truly flat part, and if the bin is cracked the lid won't be of much use otherwise.

 

The other thing that makes assembling custom fruiting chambers easier is using aluminum blind rivets to fasten pieces together. They don't rust, can be drilled out if necessary, and can be used to affix something like FRP to a frame made of PVC pipe without having to drill all the way through the pipe, which can make for a cleaner and tighter build, depending on the design.

 

I've made a few elaborate automated and totally waterproof setups using 1/16" and 1/8" thick aluminum angle stock, PVC pipe and "furniture" fittings, PVC trim boards (like wood trim, but PVC; incredibly useful stuff if not exactly environmentally friendly), FRP, clear acrylic panels, thick plastic sheeting, rivets, and stainless steel fasteners (nuts and bolts, usually really small ones like #6 or #8 machine screws). With all that stuff you can build just like you were using wood but everything will be corrosion-proof and won't support mold growth. The PVC stuff can also be glued together if you're sure you like your design. And the best waterproof construction adhesive/sealant for this context is the Loctite Tub Surround stuff.


Edited by TVCasualty, 27 May 2020 - 01:41 PM.

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