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Indoor ovoids and freezers


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#1 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 08:13 PM

I've read that freezing mycelium then thawing can simulate the spring fruiting conditions of ovoids and allow for indoor fruits. Anyone experiment with this. Ive got a jar of colonized woodchips mixed with a little potting soil in the freezer. Im going to leave it for a day or so then water it and see what happens. Why not?
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#2 Toybox78

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 08:28 PM

Im very interested I never would have thought to do that ive got a few plates, I might try to run this side by side with you if you don't mind comparing notes

Your friendly neighborhood toybox
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#3 YoshiTrainer

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 09:35 PM

I've pints of Ovoids and Allenii, thinking along the same lines, maybe even treat them cake style?

#4 Arathu

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 05:08 AM

Leave them in "winter" conditions longer than a day, then simulate "spring"..............(currently the best method that I know of is to allow mother nature to induce pinning)

 

Trays left out in the winter for a month or better can be brought into a nice "springlike" environment and will fruit (assuming you have a fungus that WILL fruit)....

 

The gradual changes from "summer" conditions to "fall" then "winter"....and then back to "spring" are what to shoot for.......IMHO

 

So "summer" to "fall" (refrigerator), to "winter" (freezer) to "spring" (refrigerator) and back into relative warmth.......

 

Nature doesn't transition (rarely anyway) from warm/hot conditions to frozen for a day and then go back to spring......

 

In fact this is probably a great topic for a thesis, grad student work even...........there are questions to be answered for sure....

 

An environmental control chamber would be optimum.......IMHO

 

A


Edited by Arathu, 01 July 2020 - 05:49 AM.

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#5 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 04:01 PM

Toybox, I put some colonized chips from an wild harvest location into a small plastic jar with some soil and froze it for about 24hr. After reading arathu's post I wish i had left it in longer. But I took it out drilled some drain holes in the bottom and watered it. Its under a plastic bag in my living room. We will see what happens. Worth a shot. Ill post photos if it works out. Good luck!
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#6 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 04:03 PM

This is where I got the idea from

https://www.trufflem...ideocystidiata/
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#7 Arathu

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 07:50 PM

It will be EXCELLENT if it works......people in warm climates will then have no excuses for NOT eating the cold woodlovers....... :biggrin:

 

Not that anyone has excuses but just saying........

 

A


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#8 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 08:40 PM

i had an idea about doing this in bulk with tubs and large chest freezer.


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#9 WalkSeeHear

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Posted 05 August 2020 - 08:39 PM

Looking forward to your results. I have a few 1/2pt jars of ovoid myc. Mostly for some outdoor beds, but would love to get some fruit before next spring. Just got a chest freezer too. Thinking about a couple of shoeboxes with wood chips. I followed your link and the article refers to a research paper I had read sometime back. If the link works, it's here:

https://www.research...d_Prakitsin_Sih

 

Interesting about all the attention to riverbed sand casing. Seems like it either adds mineral, or restricts AE, or maybe isn't actually necessary??



#10 Arathu

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 05:56 AM

The answer is YES.....IF you have the right strain (one that has fruited outdoors already is a really good place to start and to clone from) then indoor fruiting a tub/tray/bag/jar cultures definitely can be done.

 

Outdoors and with mother nature makes so you have some stash while you're learning to simulate HER methods........NOT a trivial pursuit by any means......

 

Straight potting soils and also compost from the compost heap also work as does simply growing fruiting blocks of enriched sawdust and chip substrates...... Oak, maple, hickory and an entire spectrum of woody plant stems.....

 

I'm certain many other species of wood work as well and I've seen it tear through OSB construction boards (note that OSB is probably not something you'll want to consume IMHO)

 

Good stuff.....

 

A


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#11 Myc

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Posted 06 August 2020 - 08:27 PM

I'm not sure if an outright freezer will work but it's worth a shot.

Here is an old project of mine which is similar:

https://mycotopia.ne...oo/#entry497255

 

I should note that while there was a little ice at the bottom of the tubs - the blocks were not frozen solid, just tenaciously colonized.

I'm afraid that if you froze the spawn solid - as in a freezer - it might kill the colony.

The project above was buried in snow - which is much warmer and provides insulation to prevent freezing. Think of a snow cave emergency shelter.

If I may suggest, perhaps you could colonize a substrate, place it in the refrigerator for a time, then cover it with shaved ice for a bit to flood the substrate. Pour-off the excess water and go from there as your specific environmental and seasonal conditions allow.


Edited by Myc, 06 August 2020 - 08:33 PM.

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#12 Arathu

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 05:58 AM

Ohio river valley in the greater Pittsburgh area can and does see winter temperatures in the single digits and below zero on occasion...........

 

Experiments are now in order..........hahahaha

 

Pint jars made from the same colonized bag of a known fruiting strain can be subjected to various conditions to see if fruiting is induced and if freezing is an issue.....

 

I've seen a known fruiting strain pin up without ever having seen anything resembling winter temperatures.....it's obviously a complex function.......

 

That thread you linked to Myc was and still is quite inspirational to me......thanks man.....

 

A


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#13 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 10:15 AM

My experimemt was a failure. Trying again with wood chips that have had longer to colonize.

#14 YoshiTrainer

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 01:05 PM

Ho lee sheet Myc, that thread of yours is unbelievable, especially the fungi porn!!! Do you have any takeaways in dealing w/azurescens or subaeruginosa?
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#15 Arathu

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 05:31 PM

Ho lee sheet Myc, that thread of yours is unbelievable, especially the fungi porn!!! Do you have any takeaways in dealing w/azurescens or subaeruginosa?

I call that INSPIRATION in many more ways than one......believe it!

 

A


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#16 Arathu

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 05:33 PM

My experimemt was a failure. Trying again with wood chips that have had longer to colonize.

Plan your woodlover work with year long time frames.....they are WAY slower than cubies...... IME

 

A


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#17 Myc

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 06:01 PM

 

My experimemt was a failure. Trying again with wood chips that have had longer to colonize.

Plan your woodlover work with year long time frames.....they are WAY slower than cubies...... IME

 

A

 

I would have to say that this statement perfectly illustrates my most valuable take-away - with any type of cultivation.

Know your region and capitalize upon the seasonal offerings.

Colonize woodlovers in the summer months and prep them for fruiting through the winter and spring months. Base your plans upon intervals of at least one year - maybe longer.

 

It's easier to bring Mohamed to the mountain rather than to try and move the mountain to Mohamed.


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#18 Arathu

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Posted 11 August 2020 - 06:37 PM

 

 

My experimemt was a failure. Trying again with wood chips that have had longer to colonize.

Plan your woodlover work with year long time frames.....they are WAY slower than cubies...... IME

 

A

 

I would have to say that this statement perfectly illustrates my most valuable take-away - with any type of cultivation.

Know your region and capitalize upon the seasonal offerings.

Colonize woodlovers in the summer months and prep them for fruiting through the winter and spring months. Base your plans upon intervals of at least one year - maybe longer.

 

It's easier to bring Mohamed to the mountain rather than to try and move the mountain to Mohamed.

 

Simply clear and well said!

 

Settling into the already established patterns and built in mechanisms THAT WORK, we are arrogant fools not to copy it.....IMHO

 

Spring and fall are special times for certain.....

 

Melting blocks in the spring and the same conditions that bring on the sheepheads in the fall......boom...


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#19 Celestialexplorer1

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Posted 29 August 2020 - 06:00 PM

I’ve had this cyanescens bowl in a mini fridge for a couple weeks. The myc is very aggressive and grew through the casing in about a week. I had it at 45 f for 4 days then switch it to 55 for a week then back to 42 f seeing how it reacts to different temps. When it gets really cold the rhizo myc coming through the casing turns blue and stalls but as soon as I switch it to 55 it turns white and starts growing again. Not sure what I need to do to induce pinning. I also have this ovoid bag in the minifrige as well. Also put a disc fogger in water in there but I think I really need some sort of oxygen flow maybe an air pump on a timer but haven’t gotten around to it yet. Just thought I’d shareE818F5CE-1839-4661-A8C8-34B794D4DDE8.jpeg D11DFCAC-FBB8-48D7-A636-A11DDA1F2685.jpeg
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#20 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 20 September 2020 - 08:01 PM

Trying again to colonize from wild sourced mycelium. Has anyone tried commercially available Ovoid spores to agar or straight to grain jars? I was thinking this might be a better way to start


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